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Reddit Posts

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Caroline Ellison is a Huge BUY Right Now. Massively Undervalued.

🏦 Is SBF is a Fed Plant (Project Hamilton)? 💸 Try to disprove me 🏦

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Some info on Caroline Ellison and SBF I found online (take it with a grain of salt )

r/StockMarketSee Post

MIT professor GINSLER lecture class to SBF how to do ponzi to fund Dems

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Conversation highlights with family member that worked with FTX in Bahamas during 2021

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Reversing hearing loss with regenerative therapy: MIT spinout Frequency Therapeutics’ drug candidate stimulates the growth of hair cells in the inner ear.

r/investingSee Post

Help me do what Elon said he would do, but isn't.

r/smallstreetbetsSee Post

AVCO Due Diligence

r/pennystocksSee Post

AVCO Due Diligence

r/pennystocksSee Post

I've kept my eye on these 4 explosive tickers & I might have found the 5th

r/smallstreetbetsSee Post

I've kept my eye on these 4 explosive tickers & I might have found the 5th

r/stocksSee Post

Exxon’s Exodus: Employees Have Finally Had Enough of Its Toxic Culture (Bloomberg)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

A GameStop (GME) stock movie called 'Dumb Money' is in the works. Seth Rogen and Pete Davidson are slotted to star in the movie. Mother of all GME short-squeezes coming?

r/SPACsSee Post

Fireside chat with TruthSocial/$DWAC Sept. 1 at 11am ET

r/investingSee Post

ESG Investing Is a Billion Dollar Sham Industry

r/stocksSee Post

ESG Investing Is a Billion Dollar Sham Industry

r/investingSee Post

The 8 economists who decide if the U.S. is in a recession

r/investingSee Post

New MIT Sloan study discovers "widespread and repeated" retroactive changes to ESG scores - Many Studies Showing that ESG has a Positive Correlation to Return may be Wrong

r/pennystocksSee Post

$XALL - Fintech company partnered with UC San Diego, Profitable and growing in revenue, Several Announcements THIS MONTH

r/pennystocksSee Post

Amesite: Ed-Tech for Enterprises is a great SaaS play

r/WallstreetbetsnewSee Post

Bill Ackman donated 500 million dollars for his wife’s research????

r/RobinHoodPennyStocksSee Post

The Future of HealthCare? Avalon GloboCare Corp. (NASDAQ-CM: $AVCO)

r/pennystocksSee Post

Avalon GloboCare Corp. (NASDAQ-CM: $AVCO) Frontier of Health Care

r/SPACsSee Post

Information Sources: Free Post for Crowd Sourcing

r/stocksSee Post

MIT uncovers security issues with Appple M1 chip

r/pennystocksSee Post

Avalon GloboCare Corp. Overview (NASDAQ-CM: $AVCO)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Will Rivian make it?

r/pennystocksSee Post

Avalon GloboCare Corp. A Brief Summary (NASDAQ-CM: $AVCO)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Sketchy PR LLC, Scorpio Capital attacks IONQ in short report. Here are some initial findings.

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Why APPL isnt moving post-earnings beat and share buybacks

r/investingSee Post

how does one invest in MIT?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

MIT - end of the world 2040

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

DD: CRISPR patent bloodbath update

r/ShortsqueezeSee Post

Make Money @ MIT's Behavioral Research Lab

r/wallstreetbetsOGsSee Post

The Official Inflation Numbers Are Correct

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

The Official Inflation Numbers Are Correct

r/pennystocksSee Post

POET Technologies ($POETF) announces it is supplying to a leading AI accelerator company

r/stocksSee Post

$PYPL Paypal establishes a cross-disciplinary advisory council on Blockchain, Crypto and Digital Currencies (BCDC)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Someone smart - how to invest in crazy strong new material from MIT?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

CRISPR DD that's not only lazy, but also manages to stack a few levels of uncertainly, meaning only a fool would give this any credence...

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Inferential swing market moves until period Jan 10-12

r/RobinHoodPennyStocksSee Post

$KOPN - swing play with a METAVERSE pennystock that will be at CES 2022 this week 1/5-1/7 (price went from $2 to $13 in the 6 weeks following previous CES 2021)

r/WallStreetbetsELITESee Post

$KOPN - swing play with a METAVERSE company that will be at CES 2022 this week 1/5-1/7 (price went from $2 to $13 in 6 the weeks following last CES 2021)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Amyris deserves a 2nd chance

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

All stock are undervalued due to rotation, but hear me out bout TAK!

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

IONQ

r/WallStreetbetsELITESee Post

Possible good entry for memecoin degens in DOBO

r/stocksSee Post

On track with MIT prediction for halted economic growth by 2030.

r/stocksSee Post

2U just acquired edX in a massive $ 800M EdTech consolidation. Here's why I'm buying

r/investingSee Post

2U just acquired edX in a massive $ 800M EdTech consolidation. Here's why I'm buying 🎓

r/SPACsSee Post

$SNII - a sympathy play to IONQ

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

$SNII Rigetti Quantum Computing - a sympathy play to IONQ

r/SPACsSee Post

The “Biden SPAC” $PIPP is back on the radar

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

$lorl to merge with telesat on the 18th/19th. 90ish of stock will be locked by the 15th and it has roughly 6% short. Meaning super low float and 60% short from 15 to merge date. Options could send this to the moon.

r/stocksSee Post

RIVN IPO on November 10

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Technical analysis in investing

r/pennystocksSee Post

$DATI DigitalAMN Aligns With Domain Industry Experts to Secure TLD—Growing Digital Asset Holdings

r/SPACsSee Post

Republic / Trump related Pre-DA SPACS ($DWAC, $PHUN, $BENE, $ZGYH play)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Desktop Metal (DM) - A Ripe Opportunity

r/stocksSee Post

dLocal (DLO) Company Discussion

r/investingSee Post

'Panic sellers during stock market dips are often married men with children' MIT

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

MIT Research on Retail Investors

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Could EverQuote (EVER) use some love?

r/StockMarketSee Post

Uranium will help reach our Green Energy needs

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Uranium Will Help Reach Our Green Energy Needs

r/StockMarketSee Post

The Medallion Fund - The greatest hedge fund of all time!

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

The Medallion Fund - The greatest money-making machine of all time!

r/stocksSee Post

Hidden Gems Discussion Attempt #2

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Which is NFT top 3 ?GME?TKAT?FNKO?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Which is NFT top 3 ?GME?TKAT?FNKO?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Which is NFT top 3 ?GME?TKAT?FNKO?

Mentions

Have you worked with people from MIT before? The majority I have are nerds with social skills bordering on the UV end of the spectrum.

Mentions:#MIT

That interview was a fucking train wreck imo. Like bro you went to MIT, I’d expect some type of normal answer not some “my oversight of positions wasn’t very good” shit like he’s a member of this sub…

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ___ If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [Finra Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#PL#MIT

I'm inclined to believe that the MIT Physics grad with Stanford law professors as parents might've known \*exactly\* what he was doing

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This guy was a math whiz that went to MIT and both his parents are attorneys and professors at Stanford. I’m pretty sure he is not that dumb to be down to $100k. This mfer has accounts and property all over the fucking globe.

Mentions:#MIT

How tf does Doomberg talk about GG and FTX without mentioning his tenure at MIT under Caroline’s father????

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ___ If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [Finra Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Dude went to MIT lmfao

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Caroline's father's mentee actually. Hired him at MIT. SBFs Dad is at Stanford law. Caroline was Almeda CEO ie the ones asking SBF for more $$$ when their insane bets lost out. Caroline was also an ex girlfriend of SBF. Personally I think SBF is on the spectrum. I think they used his obsession with effective altruism to convince him to take stupid risks and I think the end goal is CBDCs ie the ideas and structure the WEF has already presented to us. Don't forget FTX was an official partner of the WEF.

Mentions:#MIT

Actually no. SBF was already known as Biden’s 2nd biggest campaign donor in the crypto community. Both his parents are politicians, he hired DAN FUCKING FRIEDBERG to his team (the man who orchestrated a massive online poker scam), his dumbass gf running Alamedas is the daughter of Glenn Ellison (Gary Gensler’s former boss). Glenn is head of economics at MIT. Gary Gensler was put in as SEC chairman by Elizabeth Warren. Gary Gensler taught at MIT (his lectures are on youtube). SBF and Caroline Ellison were MIT students. FTX and Alamedas were across the street from each other in the Bahamas. SBF stole billions and was the most politically involved crypto ceo in DC. He lobbied and lied in front of congress a week before the collapse. He met with Gary and Biden multiple times. I think it is painfully obvious that something is wrong here. Gary and SBF are obviously corrupt. This is extremely problematic if your nation’s SEC CHAIRMAN IS CORRUPTED. I mean these guys let BILLIONS of retail customer money get stolen, and donated to mostly the democratic party. The fact that the media doesn’t cover any of this is what’s wild. Denying these facts and protecting the democratic party makes you a left wing nut. SBF’s political donations: 97% of it to the democratic party. Even democratic senators who were not in the loop are pissed off and are demanding investigation. Gary Gensler could single handedly destroy the left’s reputation. This is why it is getting silenced. This is a BIPARTISAN issue when it comes to congress.

Mentions:#DAN#MIT#DC

This is why so many people want Gary Gensler (current SEC chairman) to be fired. This slimeball has the gull to not present himself in front of congress but met up with Sam multiple times. Meanwhile instead of stopping FTX he went after kim kardashian for not publicly disclosing a paid promotion on a scamcoin (which so many celebrities did during the bull market). Then after the FTX collapse Gary went on live tv to basically say that the market is clearly regulated. ????? No it is not! There are no regulations! That’s the problem that’s why there are 20,000+ cryptocurrencies in existence. SEC is not doing their job and they want to keep the regulations unclear so they can continue abusing their power. And you know what else is crazy Gary happens to be a former MIT professor and he was already connected with Sam’s parents who are politicians and he even has ties to caroline from alamedas. He is corrupt asf and needs to be ousted asap. I have been complaining about him on reddit for over a year now. SEC’s job is to protect investors…

Mentions:#MIT

Wow! How did you do that? You should go to MIT or something

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Caroline Ellison's father once was a direct report to Gensler at MIT and remains good friends with him.

Mentions:#MIT

https://www.kokopft.com/about This company hired a coding wizard from MIT to build a Blockchain database for storing and sharing patient data "anonymously". Several months ago they received a massive (with respect to their valuation) buyout offer, and then a week later fired every employee on the same day except for the CEO and the lady from MIT. Because it turns out the respiratory stuff that they sell was only a front; they were bought out purely for their Blockchain db. Publicly, the idea behind their database is that it saves patients money by cutting down on admin/paperwork duties required for hospitals and doctors offices to update and share your medical history when necessary. Which is true. But the more lucrative reason for using Blockchain is it allows for your data to be shared with private sector companies, including insurance providers, without violating HIPAA. There are many other startups in the Medical Device Sales Industry that are doing this, right now. And it's going to end with the largest violation of personal privacy in history. All because Nakamoto wants to learn about what keeps us healthy + what makes us vulnerable.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

I think it might be as simple as the Bahamas wanting as big a cut of the remaining cash as possible and protecting him until then. The US *could*, but isn’t going to, functionally invade the Bahamas to get him. ThE DnC theory is absurd. They every penny given to them can be traced. They lost a major contributor. Left-adjacent orgs like propublica are screwed because he was running the same affinity scam Madoff ran with Jewish orgs. He contributes money and they invest with him. They lose a major contributor and their investments. People are literally drawing lines between Jews, MIT Professors and prominent democrats, like that is hard to do, to prove a point. Surprise, rich well educated people of the same minority religion know other… He should, and will be, arrested but the noise around it is absurd.

Mentions:#MIT

Has Buffett seen Gary Gensler’s full 20+ lecture course at MIT on the technology and capability of crypto and bitcoin ?

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Best schools? Boston has literally 5 schools better than every school Toronto has (except for UofT)- Harvard, MIT, Boston University, Boston College and Northeastern

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Could have saved the company? I thought SBoobieF was a genius. Lesson - because one goes to MIT, it doesn’t make you intelligent. Just shows you got great connections and obviously he does.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

There is a chance that he is faking incompetence. I refuse to believe someone who went to MIT and worked at Jane Street can be that dumb. Being a dumbass works a lot better in court than knowingly embezzling customer money.

Mentions:#MIT

I know MIT mathematicians and Chicago econ PhDs who get paid +1MMs just to do research for the traders at the top hedge funds. They have absurd budgets for buying all sorts of research and information you will never get access to in addition to access to experts and ex CEOs of sectors they are trading in. Then they have their quant trading models. If you actually knew the depth of info they get, you would get stop now. And then you have the market makers that have knowledge of every fucking trade you make and sell this information.

Mentions:#MIT

I’m an employee here, just want to give my perspective. Lots of us feel recent tiktoks that were for glamor and 15 sec of fame misrepresented the industry. A classic one was the TikTok PM girl - the sentiment in tech markets is people like this shouldn’t be here, because the effect they have is devaluing those of us pulling 40/50 hr weeks to make sure services run for 3.5b people. By the way, she is not exactly a PM, and her day to day absolutely does not look like that. It hurts me to see my peers cast in this light - one coworker authored the computer vision module used by majority of medical AI research after his thesis at MIT, yet he’s being chalked up with these tiktok influencers.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

It’s not as hard as people often believe. The interview grind is tough but with the right background you can get an interview. You don’t need to have gone to Harvard or MIT, a few years working in software dev will count the same.

Mentions:#MIT

Chinese MIT professor accused of spying is credited with the find, no? China born professor Gang Chen. They're probably already ahead of us ;)

Mentions:#MIT

You have to ask yourself why they haven’t and why the head of the SEC used to teach courses in blockchain at MIT.

Mentions:#MIT

Look at the American election system for proof some MIT grad isn't changing anything tomorrow. You still believe college is where smart people go?

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Essential its a coding innovation. Blockchain can be useful so that part of it isn't bad; however, that doesn't mean its a currency. The thing with currency is there isn't a better thing, in that currency is currency and there is no innovation in currency itself. We could wake up tomorrow and some MIT grad student has developed a new system that makes blockchain irrelevant. Fundamentally this is why crypto will never be a currency. The dollars value can go up and down, but it is what it is. Blockchain could become useless tomorrow if someone made a better system.

Mentions:#MIT

You've tempted me here haha That isn't quite what I said. I said an individual investor without a competitive advantage cannot reliably beat the market over any appreciable length of time. If you have access to an advantage, the calculus is different, but even then, those margins are fantastically small. I've been on Wall Street for \~10 years now. The firms that I've worked and work for make their money on fees. I understand that there is a romantic ideal of being a maverick genius who can see things that others cannot, but hell, we're having this post on a topic where you are lamenting the market moving against you constantly. Put another way: If you, as an individual investor, are getting risk-adjusted overperformance relative to the market over an appreciable period of time based on "calling" political events then you are outperforming the smartest and most efficient firms and organizations on the planet. Do you really and sincerely think you have an analytical ability that is not only better than MIT graduates who are paid millions do to the same work, but better than an entire team of them? An entire team of them with access to capital 1,000x more than you have? Your competition is a dozen Ivy League / MIT / Stanford / Berkeley Mathematicians who have more information than you, more capital than you, can trade at a speed approaching the speed of light and this is the only job they have for 80 hours a week. This is what I mean by delusion. If these groups of people are not capable of reliably overperforming the market terribly consistently, why would you think that you can? When these people make their money by leveraging those advantages, why do you think you can do it with intuition? The only evidence I have so far in either direction for your case is this OP and your comments thereafter. The OP is written in the cadence of a novice trader and the posts thereafter are what make me see delusion here. While my words are pretty blunt in all these responses, I am, sincerely, trying to help you - you're spinning a really attractive fantasy for yourself that, unfortunately, doesn't have bearing in reality.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

BRUH. SHE WORKED THERE FOR 19 MONTHS, CHILL. Also, just to be real - how hard can it fucking be to go from a legacy admit into a Stanford/MIT where your parents are professors, to getting an internship at Jane Street? These people fall ass backwards each level up the ladder. Wealth turns off gravity. And then the spectators will point and be amazed by how high of a rung they've reached.

Mentions:#MIT

I'm sorry that you were not as smart or rich like me to get into Yale/Princeton/Harvard/MIT/Stanford/CalTech.

Mentions:#MIT

I can't say much for her looks, but her parents are both economists at MIT.

Mentions:#MIT

Find the story it gets better every time. Her parents are professors at MIT and these guys made her CEO because she came to her pitch stoned and dressed as a sultry wood nymph. She then run the business like a sex cult in the Bahamas and ended up in a Harem in China. I cant even make this shit up. The other CEO bought a boat and left last year.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Caroline Ellisson. Ex-ceo or something of Sam B-F's FTX company. Also daughter of TWO MIT economics professors. let that sink in.

Mentions:#TWO#MIT

Both her parents are actually econ professors at MIT.

Mentions:#MIT

Holy shit -- i jut looked her up. Both her parents are MIT professors. I was actually at an online session with her mother just a couple of weeks ago! goddamm

Mentions:#MIT

Looks like the average Stanford student. If you showed me this pic and asked me to guess where this person went to college I’d say Stanford, Caltech or MIT.

Mentions:#MIT

And her dad is a math prof at MIT

Mentions:#MIT

Him and his little orgy group in the Bahamas went to MIT. They worked in finance BEFORE this crypto shit. What they did was illegal and they did it anyway.

Mentions:#MIT

> Caroline Ellison Apparently, she was the daughter of two MIT economics professors. So people probably thought "well, this kid probably knows what she is talking about." (She didn't.) It's the whole "everybody stand back and let me work, my dad is a doctor!"-effect.

Mentions:#MIT

I would like to add regarding which resources to follow. Take knowledge or inspiration for actual investors or traders who have been doings this for decades and are wildly successful. You can look at MIT lectures or other professors, but very rarely I have seen them professionally investing or provide real life investing systems for you to understand. Investing is more about psychology of what people are ready to pay for an asset and when the demand for asset occurs and wanes.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - \[Reading List\]([https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist)) Since you are in college - if you want to look at investing lectures on Youtube. These can be good: If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is \[Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University\](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relevant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - \[Financial Theory (2008) - MIT\](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - \[Corporate Finance Spring 2019\](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/\~adamodar/New\_Home\_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/\~adamodar/New\_Home\_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#PL#MIT

daughter of MIT professor who was boss of Gary Gensler the head of SEC

Mentions:#MIT

Dad's Glenn Ellison, head of economics at MIT. Can't find anything else about him. What do you know that you aren't saying?

Mentions:#MIT

I thought that was weird. I thought she went to MIT, too, but Wikipedia says her bachelor's is from Stanford, in ~~meth~~ math.

Mentions:#MIT

Interesting the George Schultz family spoke up against her at sentencing. The grandfather, who was in several Presidential cabinets and MIT and Stanford professor lost a bundle. The grandson worked for Theranos, discovered the fraud and notified the authorities.

Mentions:#MIT

Uhhhh, then he’d just owe *different* people $8b. For an MIT grad, he kinda sucks at math.

Mentions:#MIT

What’s even more wild is that her dad, Larry Ellison, is buddies with Glen Gensler, head of the SEC from their MIT days.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ___ If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [Finra Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavent course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ___ If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [Finra Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavent course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#PL#MIT

> why is SEC chair Gary Ginsler under fire for the implosion of a crypto exchange because Sam GFs father was Garys boss at MIT :P

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

SBF = FBI plant. Change my mind. Mom was democrat, massive democrat donations, MIT fraud professors. Guy was the poster child to regulate even defi, now hes the fall guy. Too many government entities tied to him. He is the US democrat communist party funnel.

Mentions:#MIT

This shit is all too weird. Caroline Ellison is the daughter of Glenn Ellison who is a professor of economics at MIT and former boss of Gary Gensler who also was a prof at MIT. Sam Bankman is a graduate of MIT. It is all connected.

Mentions:#MIT

Yep, both at MIT, which guess where SBF went to school.....

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Good question. I think the same thing could be said about Jason Kelly of Ginkgo. He's been very good at convincing investors to give them tons of money, but as someone who works in that field it's pretty obvious he's full of shit and the company is wildly ineffective. Maybe going to MIT and being able to sell a compelling story to investor bros is all you need to steal a bunch of money from people.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

I agree it is definitely crazy... The term genius gets thrown around a lot by people who are not experts in the field, and are impressed by superficial metrics of intelligence or technical skills. He went to MIT, founded multiple companies and raised billions of dollars. From an outsiders view, only a genius should be able to do that. I imagine the guy is probably technically very skilled at what he does, but often those people fail to see the big picture or have a skewed sense of reality that doesn't match the real world. He had a clever strategy to accumulate a bunch of money, but he failed to see that his ponzi scheme wasn't sustainable in the real world.

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

Interesting tidbit: Caroline's (Alameda CEO) father works as a professor for MIT where he was coworkers with Gary Gensler So it actually might be corruption

Mentions:#MIT

Hey guys I was doing some DD over the weekend and I found out about this company called FTX. Literally, I couldn’t believe my fucking eyes! Tom Fucking Brady and Steph Fucking Curry are backing this gem!!! How in the fuck did I never hear about this until now! They even have a fucking arena named after them. Literally a fucking arena! Look guys, the coin is trading for only $1.57 at the time of writing. I’m buying the fuck out of this dip right now! The CEO is a fucking MIT grad and his parents are fucking compliance lawyers!! Even Kevin “Mr. Wonderful” (I like to call him Mr. Fuck You Bro) from Shark Tank (YES, FUCKING SHARK TANK) is backing this mother fucker! To the moon. Good luck all! 🚀 🌚

Mentions:#MIT

Hey guys I was doing some DD over the weekend and I found out about this company called FTX. Literally, I couldn’t believe my fucking eyes! Tom Fucking Brady and Steph Fucking Curry are backing this gem!!! How in the fuck did I never hear about this until now! They even have a fucking arena named after them. Literally a fucking arena! Look guys, the coin is trading for only $1.57 at the time of writing. I’m buying the fuck out of this dip right now! The CEO is a fucking MIT grad and his parents are fucking compliance lawyers!! Even Kevin “Mr. Wonderful” (I like to call him Mr. Fuck You Bro) from Shark Tank (YES, FUCKING SHARK TANK) is backing this mother fucker! To the moon. Good luck all! 🚀 🌚

Mentions:#MIT

Hey guys I was doing some DD over the weekend and I found out about this company called FTX. Literally, I couldn’t believe my fucking eyes! Tom Fucking Brady and Steph Fucking Curry are backing this gem!!! How in the fuck did I never hear about this until now! They even have a fucking arena named after them. Literally a fucking arena! Look guys, the coin is trading for only $1.57 at the time of writing. I’m buying the fuck out of this dip right now! The CEO is a fucking MIT grad and his parents are fucking compliance lawyers!! Even Kevin “Mr. Wonderful” (I like to call him Mr. Fuck You Bro) from Shark Tank (YES, FUCKING SHARK TANK) is backing this mother fucker! To the moon. Good luck all! 🚀 🌚

Mentions:#MIT

I hold a doctorate in engineering, specialty in propulsion, from MIT with a bachelor's from Penn. My thesis was studying the ways that friction ratios affect steering outcomes in aeronautical use under reduced gravity loads.

Mentions:#MIT

using Hunter's laptop. Gensler worked for SBF's ex-girlfirend aka Alameda CEO's dad at MIT before SEC gig

Mentions:#MIT

he gave a lot to people high up and his father studied physics at MIT and figured out all the MIT shit and then went to Berley to get his 4 year shit, then wandered over to Yale and became a lawyer - then once he did lawyer shit he became a law professor at Stanford because he didn't like the weather at Harvard.. That guy.. he knows the people who know the top secret shit

Mentions:#MIT

Im not 100% sure of the reason but I saw that during 2008 since the stockmarket went down but the value mesured in many other currencies was not down because the dollar was expensive. But here is my view of it: I think it makes more sence if you look at it from a suply demand persective. Demand for stocks and bonds for ~50trillion dollars go down and what they want for the stocks is dollars. Since dollar is dominating the market the dollar demand is high enough to "force" printing new dollar bills especially if there is no/low confidence in bonds there can be a credit crunch. So its probably predictable that dollar will keep dropping towards in particular if look at USD/SEK or USD/POUND not so much for USD/EUR if US stocks keep recovering and global, inflation, diplomacy, conflict, energy problems and such stabilize. You will find a decent correlation with 10y bond yields TNX 30y bond yields TYX vs stocks and once intresst rates on bondyields go up above 3,5% gold starts to become less viable savings alternative so gold prices could go down if bond yields goes up. But since inflation seems to get lower bondyields probably will go down and gold will go up if it can compete with stocks but I doubt that. Still gold currently has a decent negative correlation with bond yields and somewhat positive with stocks it used to be zero or negative because gold was currency and a more dominant safe haven asset. So i belive stocks and gold up USD TNX TYX down If you want a long MIT deep dive in portfolio strategy: https://youtu.be/8TJQhQ2GZ0Y

Mentions:#MIT

Yes I've come to believe these kinds of people are the scourge of humanity and most human suffering is their fault Her father was an MIT professor and a high ranking SEC asshole, I have no doubt there's a lot of "I'm God" attitude going on in the family

Mentions:#MIT

This topic has been removed because it is a beginner topic or asking for advice (rule 2). We get too many of these topics every day and the community has asked us to prevent them from swamping the front page. **You are welcome to repost your question in the Daily Advice Thread**. This [thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1) should be stickied at the top of the subreddit every morning. *** You can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets, the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) - there are also short 30 second videos on basics. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. Some examples are [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) taught by Prof. Shiller, [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW) taught by Prof Andrew Lo, and [Corporate Finance Webcast - NYU Stern School of Business](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html) taught by Prof Aswath Damodaran. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) If you have any issue with this removal, please message the moderators. Thank you.

Mentions:#PL#MIT

His professor at MIT is the current SEC chairman. When you have connections like that you don't get put in the normal prison population, and probably get away with everything anyway.

Mentions:#MIT