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r/investingSee Post

Considering adding bonds to my portfolio?

r/RobinHoodPennyStocksSee Post

MDAI - announced the submission of an application in the United Kingdom for its predictive software DeepView AI®-Burn to be registered as UK Conformity Assessed (UKCA) for burn wound use in the UK.

r/stocksSee Post

PRE - UK Based Rare Earth Miner & Processor - recent rises

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Almost one in five UK-listed companies issued profit warnings last year, exceeding the height of the 2008 financial crisis, according to E&Y

r/investingSee Post

Can big crowdfunding companies be sued for their incorrect valuations of start-up companies which lead to failed investment? Seedrs and AllPlants

r/investingSee Post

Replacing SP500 ETF exposure with options (or similar)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

The Market Maker's Kryptonite: Civil Spoofing Exposure

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Why the fuck is UK100/FTSE so dead?

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The hedgies who sniffed out Wirecard have a new target: the AI bubble

r/pennystocksSee Post

PHE - UK Green Energy Company

r/stocksSee Post

UK housing market and 99% mortgage

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

$CELH. Is their appointment of Suntory instead of PepsiCo for UK market a concern?

r/investingSee Post

Looking for a place to invest in the S&P500 in the UK without high minimum costs.

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

UK Inflation Sees First Uptick in Nearly a Year, Sparking Debate on Monetary Policy.

r/stocksSee Post

Russia’s Gazprom Says Gas Flow to China Set New Daily Record

r/stocksSee Post

(Bloomberg) Apple Vision Pro deliveries are delayed to March

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Wall Street Newsletter S03E06: All-time highs are here. What's next?

r/investingSee Post

10k Dollars to my name and nothing else (26M)

r/pennystocksSee Post

10k Dollars to my name and nothing else (26M)

r/ShortsqueezeSee Post

UK - 500k float, 13k shares short, we can push this!

r/investingSee Post

Can US do good while the rest of the world is cratering?

r/stocksSee Post

We are 5y to 10y away from global EV adoption mandate deadlines. Is now a good time to be bullish on lithium stocks while they’re cheap?

r/investingSee Post

We are 5y to 10y away from global EV adoption mandate deadlines (EU, CA, US). Is now a good time to be bullish on lithium stocks while they’re cheap?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Why the EU COMMISSION can't legally veto the Amazon and Irobot Merger/Acquisition. (All in 40k.)

r/stocksSee Post

Hypothetical Question About China-Taiwan Military Conflict

r/WallStreetbetsELITESee Post

Anyone been looking into CEL-SCI?

r/pennystocksSee Post

$INBS - another UK whale, FDA/USA awaits

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The American System - Profits Over Life; A Tiny Biotech's Battle to Bring a Cancer Vaccine to Market

r/StockMarketSee Post

A UK ISA to buy whatever US stocks I feel like buying!

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Gotta sink the ship if you wanna get rich – Jan 17 2024 – 24 hours post opening trade

r/investingSee Post

Why are UK banking stocks priced so lowly with limited growth compared to US banking stocks?

r/investingSee Post

Career advice - wanting to change into something involving S&S, data analysis and investing

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Zim will 🚀🌕

r/StockMarketSee Post

Everything to watch and expect for the trading week ahead, including expectations and analysis around AAPL, TSLA, and RETAIL SALES data.

r/stocksSee Post

Everything I'm Watching going into the trading week, including expectations around TESLA, AAPL and SPX Call Resistance at 4800.

r/investingSee Post

Vanguard services (Voyager Select, etc.) for UK Residents?

r/investingSee Post

Opinions on trading212 (safe and legit?)

r/investingSee Post

50k in savings. Novice to investing in stocks and bonds. Not so much novice in crypto.

r/investingSee Post

ETF Help (New investor advice)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What are your thoughts on Uranium plays?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

So should I put money into Lockheed/Raytheon after tonight?

r/stocksSee Post

Stock screener and portfolio tracking, Google finance vs Yahoo finance

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

How can CPI data impact stocks?

r/investingSee Post

UK Broker for Norway Stock Exchange?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Thank goodness. My $ZIM calls were growing cold.

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Calling all non-regarded. Help me cheat at the New Coinbase Quiz

r/pennystocksSee Post

Avricore Health - AVCR.V making waves in Pharmacy Point of Care Testing! CEO interview this evening as well.

r/pennystocksSee Post

Clean Vision Corporation’s Subsidiary, Clean-Seas Partners UK Ltd, Successfully Receives ESG Second-Party-Opinion for Its Green Bonds From ISS ESG

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Found Old share certificates from 1995

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

M&A Arb: Amazon Buying iRobot

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Chief executive of collapsed crypto fund HyperVerse does not appear to exist

r/stocksSee Post

Buying Apple stock from UK

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

How do you short a stock ?

r/pennystocksSee Post

Intelligent Bio Solutions - FDA/USA awaits

r/investingSee Post

UK GILTS vs Vanguard UK GILT ETF (Acc) What's the difference?

r/stocksSee Post

Feedback on my first Stocks and Shares ISA portfolio

r/investingSee Post

Feedback on my first Stocks and Shares ISA portfolio

r/investingSee Post

Just starting (UK) - advice required

r/stocksSee Post

What happens to shares when a company delists from a stock exchange?

r/WallStreetbetsELITESee Post

Uranium in 2024; what's next?

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Amateur UK-based Trading 212er: Is it normal for a January dip post christmas? If so why?

r/investingSee Post

British expat living in the US. Thoughts on my investing and saving strategy

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Brokerage Issue

r/investingSee Post

British expat in the UK, want to run my logic past some 3rd party people

r/investingSee Post

Investing in software companies (tin foil chat)

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Does anyone know why AstraZeneca's (AZN on Nasdaq) retained earnings are negative?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Giving you a 2024 outlook/2023 recap links compilation for homework

r/investingSee Post

Learning to Invest in stocks and shares

r/optionsSee Post

Paying tax on gains/losses for a UK based trader

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Summary of US and European stock markets in 2023

r/ShortsqueezeSee Post

$FSR Fisker Shares Soar as EV Maker Plans to Accelerate Sales, Deliveries

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Can I get some input on my choice on pension investments?

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Cannot Purchase Specific Stock

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SQ: The Premierly Diversified Company in Its Field

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Covid Chaos in Great Britain

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

UK Options Broker

r/investingSee Post

If you had £800 ($1,015) spare each month where would you invest it?

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UK ISA advice

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Year end reflections

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REITs vs SP500 vs dividend delusion

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The benefits of portfolio building over trading; more profits less pain essentially: my journey

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UK at risk of recession after economy shrinks by more than expected, from a 0.2% growth to -0.1%.

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Advice on my current stocks and shares funds

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10 points that identify a successful investment that High Tide inc owns

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I'm a professional regard and these are my notes 19/12

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($ADBE vs Figma) Why Do US-based Companies Need To Get Approval From EU or The UK before They Can Acquire Another Company

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Adobe and Figma call off $20 billion merger

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What do you think about Robinhood ($HOOD)?

r/investingSee Post

Im a professional money manager and this is everything I'm watching for the week ahead

r/investingSee Post

Im a professional money manager and this is everything I'm watching for the week ahead. I hope it helps someone

r/StockMarketSee Post

I'm a professional money manager and this is everything I'm watching for the week ahead

r/stocksSee Post

I'm a professional money manager and this is everything I'm watching for this week ahead.

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Does anyone here acoomulate $MSTR to not buy BTC on shitxchangers?

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YOLO on ViaPlay (SHORT until death or glory) YOLO

r/pennystocksSee Post

What's the general opinion on Versarien here?

r/StockMarketSee Post

Economic Events and Notable Earnings for the week starting 12-11

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

USD/YEN TRADE IT BIG!

r/WallstreetbetsnewSee Post

10 points that identify a successful investment that High Tide inc owns

r/pennystocksSee Post

10 points that identify a successful investment that High Tide owns

r/investingSee Post

Austrian government bond comparison for all maturities

Mentions

Thanks for the reply greytoc, I've been buying and selling within my ISA and SIPP from 2017. I'd seen the list of brokers on the tradingview website, but trying to find a broker that I could use that was more biased to the UK for charges/percentages etc. J

Mentions:#UK

Would love to hear what you guys think about Noventiq, COOL's target.  A profitable UK digital transformation company with huge presence in India.  Seems to merging at a reasonable valuation and vote date is the 26th of this month.

Mentions:#COOL#UK

Hi just been made redundant, I've been looking at 'tradingview' and am currently working with a 'paper' account. Not real trading. Live in the UK, use a SIPP and an ISA. Does anybody know which broker is the best to use with Tradingview that's suitable for UK customers? Thanks. J

Mentions:#UK

Unless you have positions to back UK your claims, nobody gives a shit. Go stand on a soapbox and shout at clouds.

Mentions:#UK

We can’t even trade options in the UK right ?

Mentions:#UK

Especially when UK itself looted trillions of dollars out of India to get where they are today.

Mentions:#UK

Agree about the capital loss. In the UK, once declared the loss has no expiry date so you can use it to offset future gains. Not sure how it works in the US.

Mentions:#UK

Wednesday’s no fun day (ie Markets closed). I have Germany beats Hungary, Scotland beats Switzerland, and Croatia beats Albania in the Euros. A $50 bet on each nets you $211 if you win (GER @ 1.25 to win = $62.50; SCO @ 4.5 to win = $225; and CRO @ 1.47 to win = $73.50). GER and CRO are safe bets but I see SCO winning bc pressure in the UK to do well this year in soccer SUI is not unbeatable so think return is worth it

Mentions:#SCO#UK#SUI

This is like how Brexit went down for people in the UK. All the idiots voted not knowing and then they regret it. Imagine the cost of 🍌 alone!!!

Mentions:#UK

Thanks for the suggestion but past experience in investing in mining companies has made me wary of jumping in on these types of companies. I was thinking more along the lines of power plant construction and operation. I was curious about the growing movement toward SMRs (small modular reactors) that GE, Rolls-Royce, and BWXT seem to be heavily invested in. You have European countries such as the UK and Poland that are looking for alternatives to Russian oil and these SMRs, if successful, could really mark a paradigm shift in the proliferation of nuclear power if what I am reading about the subject is accurate. These companies are already profitable and are diversified outside of nuclear energy.

Mentions:#GE#BWXT#UK

But the market doesn't believe in it. Even during the breakout phase, Wall St didn't even bat an eye and there was almost no media attention about the product. The only thing I could find after doing a lot of searching was a woman in the UK who did an experiment to find she couldn't get sober any faster after drinking Shot.

Mentions:#UK

Quantum computing will absolutely be the future, long term hold for sure but will be the next tech boom. The government is pouring tons of money into quantum computing research. Look at Rigetti computing (RGTI), it’s being researched at US military national labs and has received several million dollars from the US and UK.

Mentions:#RGTI#UK

The American economy is not as strong as we all thought. Growth has slowed to stall speed over the last four months. It looks like a hardish landing after all. Citigroup has become the first big American bank to warn that the US has already tipped into a recession. Once this process begins, it can snowball very fast into mass business layoffs unless the Federal Reserve moves fast. There is no sign of that. Some Fed officials are still breathing fire about inflation, judging that their survival as an independent institution depends on out-Volckering even the great inflation-slayer Paul Volcker. “The US economy is clearly slowing down, and in our base case it is headed for an outright contraction,” said Andrew Hollenhorst, Citigroup’s US chief economist. If so, US Treasuries, German Bunds, and UK Gilts are massively mispriced. So are BBB junk bonds trading at an average wafer-thin spread of 1.09pc, matching the extreme complacency seen before the global financial crisis. Mr Hollenhorst has pencilled in a contraction of 0.3pc and 2.1pc (annualised) over this quarter and next, with double-digit falls in business equipment investment. That in turn will push unemployment to 5.5pc by the end of the year in a classic recessionary dynamic. Jerome Powell The Federal Reserve, led by Jerome Powell, has been holding off on rate cuts CREDIT: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque Citigroup says the Fed will be forced to cut interest rates in July and then at every meeting until mid-2025. An outcome of this severity would spread to Britain almost instantly through the world’s dollarised credit system and via contagion effects, leaving the new government facing an immediate economic crisis. A Chancellor Reeves would be compelled to cut spending and tighten budget policy, in a destructive pro-cyclical fashion, unless she could summon the courage to ditch our toxic, anti-investment fiscal rules and reestablish macroeconomic sovereignty. It would probably snuff out the fledgling recovery in the eurozone, already anaemic as fiscal austerity returns. Private credit is barely alive under the current monetary overkill of the European Central Bank, again under German control after the Mario Draghi escapade, and clearly geared at this juncture for German political needs. Investors must navigate these treacherous waters with great care. Well-timed calibrated Fed rate cuts and a soft landing can be a tonic for stock markets. It is a different matter if the Fed is behind the curve, cutting rates only after recessionary forces have metastasised. In normal times, the worst adage in the investment universe is ‘sell in May and don’t come back until Labour Day’. You end up chasing equities higher after months of frustration, bleeding money with two sets of transaction costs along the way. This year it may be worth paying the insurance premium. Andrew Harnett from Bank of America says equity breadth on the S&P 500 is the worst since the depths of the global financial crisis in March 2009. Nvidia alone is holding up the universe. His advice: “Buy bonds in the second half”; sell equities and credit as soon as the Fed starts to cut rates. Yes, the world is choking on the scale of bond issuance, but cyclical flight to safe havens trumps structural worries about solvency in a recession. America’s economic slowdown has crept up on the world. Labour economists have been warning for months that the US jobs market is breaking down. The trouble always starts with millions of ‘marginally attached’ workers, mostly off the radar screen. Revised data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis now suggests that the labour specialists were right. The rise in salaries and wages in the first quarter was less than half earlier estimates. The annual rate of economic growth has fallen from 4.8pc, to 3.4pc, to 1.3pc, over the last three quarters. April was undoubtedly even weaker. The ISM manufacturing index fell further into contraction in May. Spending in restaurants has begun to buckle too. Mr Hollenhorst said the hiring rate is now the weakest for a decade. Firms are still hoarding labour – on lower hours – but once confidence snaps and the lay-offs start in earnest, the process takes on a life of its own. “The history of economic cycles suggests that this will not be smooth,” he said. Simon Ward, from Janus Henderson, says there are two extra monetary effects to worry about. The US Treasury has cut reliance on short-term bills to fund the deficit, and this slows money growth. The Treasury has also been draining liquidity by rebuilding its cash balance at the Fed. Both effects are likely to turn “significantly contractionary” with the usual lag. The great American boom ended some time ago despite a turbo-blast from the Inflation Reduction Act. The record does not look so good when you adjust for immigration. Real disposable income per capita is down 0.5pc over the last year. That may explain why so many voters are in such a bad mood. Americans have depleted their excess savings from the pandemic and are now depleting their credit lines as well. The St Louis Fed says the percentage with delinquent credit card debt has hit double digits and is approaching the peak seen at the end of the dotcom bubble. Delinquency rates have risen to 17.4pc in poorer zip codes, but have also soared to 7.4pc among the richest decile. It is sobering to think that the US economy is running out of steam even though the personal savings rate has fallen to historical lows of 3.8pc of GDP, four percentage points lower than the pre-Covid average. This is a coiled spring in waiting. Consumers will retrench suddenly and en masse as soon as they start to worry about their jobs. It is even more sobering that a cyclically adjusted fiscal deficit of 6.7pc of GDP at the top of the cycle is no longer gaining traction. The fiscal multiplier has collapsed. Torsten Slok from Apollo Global Management said the nominal deficit could blow through 10pc of when recession hits. America’s debt accumulation over the last seven years is akin to the costs of a world war. The International Monetary Fund says the US gross debt ratio has ballooned from 105pc to 123pc of GDP under the Trump-Biden spending blitz. It is heading for 134pc by 2029, and that assumes clear blue skies and no recession. We could be talking about 140pc plus before long. Pessimists say there is little to show for it. Strategic optimists say the money has been well spent launching America’s industrial rearmament and preventing China running away with clean-tech supremacy. It is a war-time cost. You cannot defeat the axis of autocracies on the cheap. The jury is out. The debt remains.

Mentions:#UK

That is some great information, thank you. I looked into this more after I read your comment, and they claim they’re in the UK but their address says Singapore. Their phone number is also just numbers 1-9…

Mentions:#UK

This is 100% a scam company. There are so many red flags. Two big obvious red flags. The contact us page for the company is the Webflow template "demo@example.com" email. They were too lazy to even setup the fake email correctly. Also - I'm guessing that you are in the UK since this company pretends to be a UK company. In the UK - all brokers and investment managers are required to be authorized and registered with the FCA (Financial Conduct Authority) - there is no such company listed - [https://register.fca.org.uk/s/search?q=Apex%20Capital%20Finance&type=Companies](https://register.fca.org.uk/s/search?q=Apex%20Capital%20Finance&type=Companies)

Mentions:#UK#FCA

Lol I'm in the UK and we have the displeasure of working with Eastern Europeans..... fuck me you must be working with child labour in India if you think they're better than the Lithuanians... In India you genuinely pay for what you get. The "lowest bid" engineers are scam artists. The highest paid end up gucking running Google.

Mentions:#UK

Didn't the UK try that for a while?

Mentions:#UK

India is still going to be India in 40 years. Will its economy grow? Sure. But relative to where the US is and continues to project towards, cumulatively India is going to be playing catch up for a while, if not forever. Also, you underestimate how much capitalism, ethics and judiciary enforcement gives the US its premium destination status. Your "53 million" Indians are desperate to migrate to America, Canada, UK and Australia and this guaranteed flow of labour is a contributor to innovation and employment in the US (think F1 students & H1B visas). Stop knocking your own down.

Mentions:#UK

> and investing in toilets I was just talking to a friend from the UK the other day who mentioned that Indians squatting on public toilets is a real problem that is common enough to need signs to show how to use a toilet, because unfortunately even though it is 2024, they still do not invest in toilet bowls over there. That, imo, shows that they are decades behind any notable improvements in QoL.

Mentions:#UK

I’m not saying India is a bad investment. It actually could be an insanely good investment. Their growth has been astronomical the last few decades. However, they have a few things going on that most investors are completely oblivious to. I’ll try to explain. *They resent the US: almost no Americans realize this because Indian schools teach them a history American schools do not. They teach that the US went on an assassination campaign against Indian nuclear scientists. They teach that the US has been giving weapons to their biggest geopolitical enemy (Pakistan) for decades and that they’ve been turning around and using those weapons to perform countless terrorist attacks on civilians. They teach that Americans supported the side committing genocide in Bangladesh while it was going on. They teach that America has repeatedly sanctioned India and banned their prime minister from entering the US. All this is to say to many of they think of American investors the same way Americans think of Russian oligarchs and treat them accordingly. * No unified language- despite what people think, Hindi is not the language all Indians speak. Like China, they have a few dominant ones and some fringe ones. This acts as a divider in communication. * They fail the biggest test of being a democracy- They lack a free press. The top watchdog groups in the world consistently report India has one of the worst track records on journalists and frequently imprisons and murders them. Free press is importance to have transparency as an investor. * They have the strongest geopolitical enemies and the weakest Allies of any superpower- Their geopolitical enemies are China attacking their border constantly and the US providing weapons the best weapons to Pakistan who has a massive military. Their biggest ally is Russia, a pariah state who is currently losing to a war they started out of greed to a country a third their size. * They have aggressive tariffs that discourage imports, leading to low desire to be their trade partner- their tariffs are extremely protectionist and most imported things have a 30% tax added to them. * They are practically a theocracy- Hindu nationalism makes Christian nationalism pale in comparison. Their current prime minister was banned from the US for the part he played in a Hindu massacre of Muslims. Many people contest this, but everyone would agree he’s been accused of it repeatedly. * Their assassination attempts lately are weakening diplomatic relations with western countries: they’ve been accused of state ordered assassinations (and attempts) of nonviolent dissidents living in the US/Canada/UK. * Rampant corruption: while I’d argue they’ve made large strides in the last decade, there are still high levels of corruption which is dangerous for investors. * Different work cultures: the caste system is like America’s racism problem on steroids (everyone says it’s over, but its effects linger). They also have been accused of rampant racism favoring Indians. They also take more time off per year compared to many countries. * Likely upcoming instability- similar to the transgender, race, and gay rights issues in the US, Indians are likely to start undergoing similar cultural shocks as they realize many of their customs contain insane wealth inequality, slavery in spirit, and essentially sex trafficking. No country is immune to those things, but I suspect the populations is about to wake up to how prevalent it is and have some societal instability as it attempts to address it in the same way Republicans and Democrats are at each others throats. *

Mentions:#UK

## All eyes on Taylor Swift's UK tour which might spur inflation and delay BOE rate cuts, tampering global rate cut expectations

Mentions:#UK#BOE

Wait you can’t trade options in the UK?,

Mentions:#UK

UK here, the king doesn’t trust us with option trading

Mentions:#UK

Again, the focus is not on Japan so much as it is for the proposition that advanced economies’ stock markets don’t always go up over time or at least go up at the high rates of growth as it had. Take the UK, for example (via FTSE 100). Over the last 5 years it’s only gone up 10%. AFAIK the UK also has a big consumer culture like the US and is a relatively wealthy country. Yet, it’s averaged a 2% gain.

Mentions:#UK

Yes unfortunately geopolitics necessitates horrible things sometimes. Just as most countries subsidize industry, they also do some very inhumane stuff, China, US, UK included.

Mentions:#UK

youre looking at a chart and making that statement ok. not taking into consideration UK elections, news on rising electricity costs in UK, etc. you be you mate

Mentions:#UK

My mum's friends bf is the head of procuring contracts for Nvidia in the UK. Excluding stock payments he earned £210,000 ($266,000) in salary and bonuses and thinks he'll earn almost double that for this year. Most bonus payments in the UK at public companies come in stock payments because of the tax advantages it gives so he's almost certainly now a millionaire

Mentions:#UK

Abbott Laboratories (ABT) has many shareholders, including institutional investors and the general public: **Institutional investors** Some of the largest shareholders include **Vanguard Group Inc., BlackRock Inc., Capital Research Global Investors, State Street Corp, Capital International Investors, Morgan Stanley, and Geode Capital Management, Llc**. As of December 30, 2023, Vanguard Group Inc. owned 9.02% of the company. General public As of December 2021, the general public, including retail investors, owned 24% of the company. While this may not be enough to sway policy decisions, they can still have a collective impact. Who are the biggest shareholders at Nestlé? **Institutional shareholders** **Holder:** The Vanguard Group, Inc. as of 09 MAY 2024 **Shares:**99.58m 3.80% **Holder:** BlackRock Fund as of 31 May 2024 **Shares:** 45.05m 1.72% **Holder:** Capital Research & Management Co. (World Investors)AS OF 09 MAY 2024 (part of the Capitol Group) **Shares:** 47.57m 1.82% **Holder:** BlackRock Advisors (UK) Ltd. as of 09 MAY 2024 **Shares:**18.75m .72% **Holder:** Geode Capital Management LLC AS OF 06 JUN 2024 **Shares:** 18.32m .70% Maybe do a little research next time. Abbot is owned by the same groups that own Nestlé.

Mentions:#ABT#UK

Best options trading platform in the UK? I’ve tried saxo trader and I just cannot get my head around it. Plus 500 works pretty well but apparently isn’t normal options. Any suggestions?

Mentions:#UK

surely because it is UK based doesn’t get attention

Mentions:#UK

Don’t have that choice available. It’s a UK ISA account, and the new broker only accepts cash accounts transfer (all positions must be sold before transfer)

Mentions:#UK

With the success of low float tickers like KAVL and SCNI. I'm loading UK today. It's another China low float stock with only 700k OS. It hasn't run yet.

Mentions:#KAVL#SCNI#UK

Tbf though do any big box chain stores really have a strategy. I'm in UK so obviously my experience will vary and I've been to Texas enough times to understand how much Americans love big box stores but given they're operating on such a tiny margin in operating terms any unforeseen factors will cut into their net profit/loss massively and lead to a spiral of closers until it eventually goes bust completely. Like I said I'm in the UK but UK discount high street chains which are essentially the same just in a different market are doing terribly rn

Mentions:#UK

In his defence, I don't think he orchestrated the Ukrainian war. My cost of living is fucking through the roof and I like in the UK. Guess that's what happens when you blow up "the bread basket of Europe "

Mentions:#UK

The chart looks like UK is ready for a run. It's a low float China ticker so it could easily move like others have.

Mentions:#UK

Yeah it's worked out great for the UK.

Mentions:#UK

Most countries subsidize industries that they believe are key to the future prosperity of their people. The US, most EU countries, and the UK also subsidize EVs, which I agree is great. But, it's one thing to throw money into, for example, university research into various battery technologies that anyone can use than to, idk, force Uyghurs in Xingang into slave labour camps to process aluminum and lithium for one specific company.

Mentions:#EU#UK

US is the muscle, Canada is UK's bank account, and Japan is well Japan.

Mentions:#UK

Ion know but in the UK you can use your retirement into any stock and NVDL is the guaranteed path to invite returns

Mentions:#UK#NVDL

Yeah, no, but that’s wrong. Infinity immigrants is not a long term viable solution to failing birth rates. If you entirely rely on that, after a generation or two cultural cohesion begins to breakdown. Just look at the UK.

Mentions:#UK

>man i studied a lot of history. you maybe read it but did not apply any logic to it. and yeah we can go back and forth but we wont get anywhere and im tired of this discussion. No, you haven't studied anything and certainly aren't applying any logic, you're just imagining things and doubling down on abject foolishness. >industrial revolution as a whole lasted almost 100 years and now people are using it as a one event. What are you on about? That isn't true at all. It is not a "one event" whatever that reductionist bullshit is supposed to mean. > I mean thats the whole point of this discussion, as some guy could not see how AI could change the world as Industrial resolution has wile ignoring the fact that it lasted around 100 years. This is incoherent. >My first post was what ai will bring and how it will revolutionize the world and that it will be just as impactful We can also package internet in it and yet we are still at the beginning of changes if we take period of 100 years. Yeah, but all your post said was it is really cool, it doesn't have anything substantive about what AI will do or how it will be greater than the industrial revolution. >Btw my father still worked on a 60 years ago without any machinery with locally made tools. And thats 120 years after industrial revolution in the middle of europe. Which has nothing to do with anything. No one cases. >I think you severely underestimate how many people were not affected much by industrial revolution for a long time. But it did change the world altho much slower than you might think. No, I don't, because the entire world has been affected by the industrial revolution. You are supremely ignorant not to understand that. >If you are american i guess its much harder to understand that cause most of your ancestors are basically europeans from the heart of the industrial revoluton (UK) and your society was build during it. Society across the world has been built on the industrial revolution. The internet you cherish so much which is accessible around the world has the industrial revolutions harnessing of electricity to thank you dolt. >Also you are less educated and ignorant and think people dont study shit even tho that might not be true I know you don't study shit because of how ignorant and stupid your remarks are. As for educated, you're neither self educated nor educated by anyone else. It's glaringly obvious. >so given all your "arguments" how do you want to want to measure the impact of industrial revolution? For me the only fair way would be how it affected everyday people. Which is a good and easy way to measure it. Finally you've said something sensible. Now, once you notice literally everything everyone does day in and day out has been measurably impacted by the industrial revolution we can end this nonsense. >So let me tell you what my study of history taught me. Bottom line is revolution brought mass production means things became more affordable but not really new, easier to travel, that you have to go to work every day for 12h (now 8), people going to the cities and leaving farms behind. Great, so in that word spew you've exposed your "study" amounts to nothing since you don't know what cars, trains, and planes are. >More and bigger cities were formed. Internet now is creating new jobs as well, makes it possible to work from anywhere, makes it possible for you not to work 8h a day and have to commute, gives people much much easier access to education and information. A) The internet is a byproduct of the industrial revolution. B) 8 hour days preexist the internet. It's like you're really trying to outdo yourself for stupid remarks every time you share a thought. >It connects the whole world the way industrial revolution never could. As i said before 120 years after industrial revolution my father still felt no effects of it. Now he is using internet and its like totally normal. If you're trying to tell me your dad's a dummy too you can save the effort because I knew from the getgo you had to get it from somewhere. >You can say if somebody lived 40years now or 40 years back then, the average person now felt more changes as it did back then. You can if you like making shit up, which obviously you do. You seem to think because you can say something that makes it true, which is naive. >But yeah i cannot argue with 100% certainty that internet impact is the same as industrial revolution especially that it the impact is quite different and in other areas. You can't argue the internet has the same impact as the industrial revolution since we've had the internet for some time and that clearly isn't true. We're discussing AI. You can't even keep track of what we're talking about. This is sad. >But again if we take 100 year timeline we are only at the beginning and i can say with certainty that this period will be talked in history as we do now about industrial revolution. Because you will it so!

Mentions:#UK

What’s the best app for UK based investors? Looking for an ISA.

Mentions:#UK

Is this something we can do in the UK and what is initial outlay?

Mentions:#UK

man i studied a lot of history. you maybe read it but did not apply any logic to it. and yeah we can go back and forth but we wont get anywhere and im tired of this discussion. industrial revolution as a whole lasted almost 100 years and now people are using it as a one event. I mean thats the whole point of this discussion, as some guy could not see how AI could change the world as Industrial resolution has wile ignoring the fact that it lasted around 100 years. My first post was what ai will bring and how it will revolutionize the world and that it will be just as impactful We can also package internet in it and yet we are still at the beginning of changes if we take period of 100 years. Btw my father still worked on a 60 years ago without any machinery with locally made tools. And thats 120 years after industrial revolution in the middle of europe. I think you severely underestimate how many people were not affected much by industrial revolution for a long time. But it did change the world altho much slower than you might think. If you are american i guess its much harder to understand that cause most of your ancestors are basically europeans from the heart of the industrial revoluton (UK) and your society was build during it. Also you are less educated and ignorant and think people dont study shit even tho that might not be true Internet on the other hand has taken in by storm and it was much quicker normalized. so given all your "arguments" how do you want to want to measure the impact of industrial revolution? For me the only fair way would be how it affected everyday people. So let me tell you what my study of history taught me. Bottom line is revolution brought mass production means things became more affordable but not really new, easier to travel, that you have to go to work every day for 12h (now 8), people going to the cities and leaving farms behind. More and bigger cities were formed. Internet now is creating new jobs as well, makes it possible to work from anywhere, makes it possible for you not to work 8h a day and have to commute, gives people much much easier access to education and information. It connects the whole world the way industrial revolution never could. As i said before 120 years after industrial revolution my father still felt no effects of it. Now he is using internet and its like totally normal. You can say if somebody lived 40years now or 40 years back then, the average person now felt more changes as it did back then. But yeah i cannot argue with 100% certainty that internet impact is the same as industrial revolution especially that it the impact is quite different and in other areas. But again if we take 100 year timeline we are only at the beginning and i can say with certainty that this period will be talked in history as we do now about industrial revolution.

Mentions:#UK

I'm in the UK and the self regulation thing is true. But it's more reactive than proactive. Betting companies set themselves up for huge fines, but I think they just accept the occasional huge fine as an expense, as most addicts don't lose everything. They make it paycheck to paycheck without admitting their addicted.

Mentions:#UK

A lot of people seem to be comparing these yields to U.S. yields, but Germany has a lower interest rate than the US, but honestly, those fees sound crazy at least as an American, see if you can buy a bond directly from your government that is usually tax-advantaged or I know UK residents have the ISA which allows you to get investments tax free. || || |||| || These were the only bonds I found that matched the description, assuming I found the right bond you'd only be making 1200\*4%=48\*6=288 euros over the next 6 years. 288\*.79.75%=229.68-50 (min. transaction fee)=179.68 euros net profit over the next 6 years or a 17.96% net gain which isn't the best, also this is a completely rough estimate as I have absolutely no idea how German taxes work and this didn't account for the 14% VAT (Typically corporate bonds don't compound)

Mentions:#UK

A lot of people seem to be comparing these yields to U.S. yields, but Germany has a lower interest rate than the US, but honestly, those fees sound crazy at least as an American, see if you can buy a bond directly from your government that is usually tax-advantaged or I know UK residents have the ISA which allows you to get investments tax free. || || |||| || These were the only bonds I found that matched the description, assuming I found the right bond you'd only be making 1200\*4%=48\*6=288 euros over the next 6 years. 288\*.79.75%=229.68-50 (min. transaction fee)=179.68 euros net profit over the next 6 years or a 17.96% net gain which isn't the best, also this is a completely rough estimate as I have absolutely no idea how German taxes work and this didn't account for the 14% VAT (Typically corporate bonds don't compound)

Mentions:#UK

A lot of people seem to be comparing these yields to U.S. yields, but Germany has a lower interest rate than the US, but honestly, those fees sound crazy at least as an American, see if you can buy a bond directly from your government that is usually tax-advantaged or I know UK residents have the ISA which allows you to get investments tax free. || || |||| || These were the only bonds I found that matched the description, assuming I found the right bond you'd only be making 1200\*4%=48\*6=288 euros over the next 6 years. 288\*.79.75%=229.68-50 (min. transaction fee)=179.68 euros net profit over the next 6 years or a 17.96% net gain which isn't the best, also this is a completely rough estimate as I have absolutely no idea how German taxes work and this didn't account for the 14% VAT (Typically corporate bonds don't compound)

Mentions:#UK

A lot of people seem to be comparing these yields to U.S. yields, but Germany has a lower interest rate than the US, but honestly, those fees sound crazy at least as an American, see if you can buy a bond directly from your government that is usually tax-advantaged or I know UK residents have the ISA which allows you to get investments tax free. [https://markets.businessinsider.com/bonds/volkswagen\_leasingmedterm\_ntsv2431-bond-2031-xs2745726047?miRedirects=1](https://markets.businessinsider.com/bonds/volkswagen_leasingmedterm_ntsv2431-bond-2031-xs2745726047?miRedirects=1) These were the only bonds I found that matched the description, assuming I found the right bond you'd only be making 1200\*4%=48\*6=288 euros over the next 6 years. 288\*.79.75%=229.68-50 (min. transaction fee)=179.68 euros net profit over the next 6 years or a 17.96% net gain which isn't the best, also this is a completely rough estimate as I have absolutely no idea how German taxes work and this didn't account for the 14% VAT (Typically corporate bonds don't compound)

Mentions:#UK

What currency do you suggest as an alternative? Doubt it’s UK, Russian, Chinese or Brazilian money, which leaves you with Euros. Which won’t happen since Europe still depends on the US for security.

Mentions:#UK

Someone told me in UK, you go to college and then university 🤔

Mentions:#UK

Not sure you can legally buy these products being UK based... Only CFDs, I think, please do confirm, though, it was merry *my research*

Mentions:#UK

[A long comment about Japanese stocks](https://www.reddit.com/r/stocks/comments/139i09y/rstocks_weekend_discussion_saturday_may_06_2023/jj96or7/) from last year if you want to know the bull thesis there specifically. TL;DR: Companies have a ton of cash and are starting to deploy it in masse to increase shareholder returns. Add in activists + a name/shame campaign. [Also one on the UK](https://www.reddit.com/r/stocks/comments/1636wgq/is_the_uk_stock_market_mispriced_a_look_at/). Second, I'd note that the stock market != economy (China's economy has seen the most transformative episode of growth in the modern world. Why are their stock market returns trash?) In fact, the correlation of GDP growth and equity returns is negative. That doesn't mean go and find the worst performing economies. Just to be aware that the link isn't so simple. Third, the usual 'priced in' argument and the fact that [small] value is historically at a cheap level to growth. Fourth, we don't really care so much about revenue as much as potential growth in earnings per share. If that comes from buybacks on cheap stocks or margin expansion, both are fine to me. Fifth, if earnings don't grow, then Japan won't be so 'cheap' and thus it's weight gets reduced in the fund.

Mentions:#UK

Yeah not ideal. I regularly do a 350 mile journey in the UK. I can do it easily with one tank in my petrol SUV. If a basic bitch EV can start doing it then I’d be all over it.

Mentions:#UK#EV

Here in the UK they’re even meant to check sustainability, like if you’re spending more than your weekly income they should put a stop to it. But a guy I work with goes down the casino 3 nights a week and regular drops more than that. Industry regulating itself, it’s about as useful as the SEC.

Mentions:#UK

the recent news about their partnerships, UK announcing the nuclear energy transformation (which benefits RR) Also, one of their main revenue lines is the sale of engine motors. However they have also armed themselves with constant maintenance and repairing for their own engines. they are being supplier and supplied side. as they slowly drift into the defence world, europe will start buying more from them. not financial advisor, I am here for the memes. but i been up and continue going up.

Mentions:#UK#RR

MoonPay Brings PayPal on Board for EU and UK Crypto Purchases

Mentions:#EU#UK

I thought it was only available in the UK market.

Mentions:#UK

It's just a 0.1% drop, no way they jump the gun so early. And don't forget that the EU, China and UK are in a way worse economic situation than the U.S.

Mentions:#EU#UK

Living in the past can lead you to some very poor financial decisions. The UK ruled the world not so long ago, now their army is about 70k strong and would not last a day against a modern force.

Mentions:#UK

Let me tell you a story about my brother, probably the best way to summarise what has happened at Boeing. My brother graduated from an MPhil in Chemical Engineering from Cambridge in 2017. In the UK, it’s fairly common for graduates to look for jobs outside of their university specialism, so naturally, he began to look for jobs in finance, banking and HF along with stuff that was actually within his technical remit. Lo and behold, at every Finance and banking interview he went to, it would last less than 20 minutes, first round. At the end of everything, he was clearly upset that none of these institutions wanted to take him on and so he decided to talk to an alumni that had done quite well in finance. During the chat, the friend of his looked at my brother and said, ‘You know, my friend, I wouldn’t hire you for any banking or finance role, and you know why? *I don’t see greed in your eyes’.* So take a moment to think through what was said back there; dude’s an engineer, and what corporate asks him to do is to act like the wolf of Wall Street in what he does. So remind me again of what happens when we have greedy engineers walking around society? Maybe two 737 Max’s nosediving to the ground and sending all onboard to the afterlife? All Make sense now?

Mentions:#UK#HF

There’s loads of undiscovered artifacts in the UK alone, go somewhere else with your ”gotcha” kindergarten logic

Mentions:#UK

Thought you were going to respond with something along this line. The thing that’s missing from your narrative is that the British outright stole most of the things they’re “preserving” in their own museums. This isn’t salvaging stuff that would have been left to rot otherwise. It’s a colonial power not allowing people to determine the destiny of their own stuff. It’s not preserving, it’s showcasing the loot that’s been plundered from around the world. The Crown Jewels are a virtual map of the empire’s greatest hits. There’s been growing sentiment from many places, including much of academia in the UK that is calling for the return of these artefacts to their places of origin as a step in righting past wrongs. You should look this up for a more complete picture to inform your perspective.

Mentions:#UK

What are your thoughts going forward on HIMS? I keep coming back to this thread to check for updates, but it looks like you exited your position. I'm playing with a lot less than you, ~$10k-15k, but I plan to keep adding on any weakness. 2023 10K shows the company is spending $446 mill of $872 mill revenue on marketing. This company seems insanely profitable, profits are just being delayed to expand recurring revenue. Expanding into UK and other countries, seems like there's a ton of growth with big profit potential. So just curious, what spooked you out of your position?

Mentions:#HIMS#UK

$1.2 mil heart surgery costs $10k in England. Forget Ozempic we need to get these chunky chubby chonkers a UK citizenship

Mentions:#UK

Are there no UK trading platforms that are free? Nearly all US ones are.

Mentions:#UK

It's hard to find an undervalued American stock now. I like TM - Toyota. PBR - Petrobras. FTSE - the UK 100.

Mentions:#TM#PBR#UK

Less of a question and more of a quick check. I started a 'fun' account outside of my core ETF portfolio which will be caped at no more than 1% total AUM with IBNK, based in the UK and I started with selling covered calls, because for Eu options we need 1000 shares I started with LSE;LLOY one of the big 4 banks in the UK. My plan for this portfolio is to build up blocks of 1k units of stock and sell covered calls on them, tax wise we get a tax free allowance for the dividends and any capital gains if the shares where called away. I'm happy to hold the underline stock long term. I expect to earn around £12 per year per contracts because of how far out of the money I set my covered calls, currently sold one at 60 strike price. the main underline goal of this is to feed my stock pickers and active investing itch as well as using up my allowances that otherwise don't get used. I understand my downside is getting shares called away then having to wait 30 days before I can buy again due to capital gains rules and that the total return can be less than market return due to underline stock not performing well. this is why I'm limiting this account to 1% of AUM. lastly my question is, do I just work on building up more blocks of shares to write more cover calls, and is there anything else I can be doing with low risk. Thanks in advance

Mentions:#UK

I would not use divident etfs when UK banks pay 5% guaranteed interest.

Mentions:#UK

I dont know what kind of instrument you have for UK. But you got the right idea. If i want to speculate for interest rate cuts in US, i would buy TLT. So i would suggest to find a long bond ETF that track the price ( not yield ) of those bonds.

Mentions:#UK#TLT

I have tested both. Tipranks works for me as it has better coverage of European and UK stocks. I made twice the annual cost back on a $5,000 investment with one tip. VIGL. I found Seeking Alpha just doesn't work for me.

Mentions:#UK#VIGL

It's a pity he's not in the UK. The deposit for my house was £16k.

Mentions:#UK

Purely anecdotal and from my memory but European politics seems very reactionary and IMO it's a side effect of the parliamentary system. In example, the UK recently had one of the largest Torrie wave that's now expected to swing in favor of Labor. I feel there are countless examples. With that, we could totally see a return to the center during the next few years once the parties in power can't deliver everything they promised.

Mentions:#UK

Ultimately, it's a matter of your own personal risk tolerance and your knowledge and experience in trading/investing in the capital markets. It's also doesn't have to be all or nothing - you can always do a little bit of each based on your level of comfort. My understanding is that mortgage rates in the UK are variable so paying down your mortgage is also a bet on any expected interest rate changes.

Mentions:#UK

Hi all. 33 years old based in the UK. Currently own 25% of our business which we are about to sell. I will stay for 6 months on £120k per year, and then go independant contracting after, which will bring in £120k-£130k per year. My market is reasonably strong and my skillset in demand, so I have no fears about my income after the sale. I will have between £225k-£250k after i have paid off debt, done house improvements and put some money away for a rainy day. My family say I should be putting all of that towards my mortgage (currently owe £542k on it over 32 years). I feel like I should be investing a good chunk of this and letting it compound, as it will beat the 2.2% interest rate I have currently, and will likely beat the 5% interest rate that I will likely be on when I renew my mortgage next year. We pay 20% on capital gains tax in the UK, so I will need to account for that. Would it be a bad idea to invest 75% and put 25% into my mortgage? Would it also be a bad idea to assign 100% of my investment portion to the S&P and leave it for 10-15-20 years? I am really unsure of what other trackers or funds i should be pooling my money into. Any advice, guidance or stories would be appreciated.

Mentions:#UK

Just sell short UK gilt bond ETF.

Mentions:#UK

Cool UK is in recession? Who gives a fuck?

Mentions:#UK

No a threat, you dont seem to understand .... the US literally has military power and strength well extended past its borders. the US has bases on every contingent and within countries outside of the US, like the UK, Spain, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, UAE, Japan, South Korea and etc. threaten the dollar and you have a problem. Brics wont succeed

Mentions:#UK#UAE

Yooo fellow UK gambler, you using trading212 CFDs by any chance ?

Mentions:#UK

Don’t touch is not a good philosophy. Instead look at won’t change for 2-5 years. Companies and industries are being disrupted increasingly more and it’s really hard to predict, if a company will retain market leadership or profitability beyond 5-10years. I would suggest, to pick companies that will grow or give good return next 5 years and revisit the portfolio every 3 years to reset. Or look at companies which have order book stretching beyond few years ( Airbus or defense stocks ) If you want a don’t touch, then buy index funds for US or EU. ( not UK ).

Mentions:#EU#UK

Only in America and UK

Mentions:#UK

I’m aware that buying something because of when it pays out is a terrible idea but I already have a very substantial amount of my favourite investment and want to have cashflow in other months as well. I’m in the UK so my choices for investments are more limited, there is no SCHD, for example. ISF and VHYL = pay date late March, June, September, December. EUE = pay date late February, May, August, November. ? = pay date January, April, July, October. Please can you tell me some dividend ETFs that I can go away and research myself which pay out with the quarterly schedule of Jan/Apr/Jul and Oct? I’d really appreciate some help with this.

Mentions:#UK#SCHD

They don't currently, but I believe that the EU/UK would step up if the US pulls support. Trump leaving Europe out to dry and leaving NATO (I know there is a law against it, but when has that stopped him?) would make it clear to Putin he can do what he wants, and Europe would have no choice but to start producing weapons at mass scale. Survival is on the line in that case. And the best place to stop Putin is as close to the border with Russia as possible.

Mentions:#EU#UK

I use IBKR from the UK (we can’t buy options here)

Mentions:#IBKR#UK