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Downsides of callable CDs?

Has anyone ever had a callable CD taken back from them?

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Best place to park $15,000 until Spring 2024?

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Might be a good time to open a CD account? 3.81 APY

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This has probably been asked a million times, but I am looking for specifics for my situations, new to this…

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Conflicting CD information out there

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Which financial instrument has the highest guaranteed rate of return?

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what is the highest CD rate? 4.5% apy is the highest I'm seeing. and is it worth it

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CD Projekt Red bullish. Update to my last post and TL;DR

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What do you know about KS State Bank?

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Who else is quietly buying CDs?

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Ibond,savings,CD only make 15.50 sadly

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Question about long-duration CD interest rates

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Potential play on "Poland incident". Polish exchange, feat. CD Projekt Red

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Best return on 4-7 month CD? Andrewsfcu 7 month CD @ 5% and US treasury bill @ 4.5%

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Investing in a Certificate of Deposit...change my mind.

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Andrewsfcu 7 month CD @ 5% or US treasury bill @ 4.5% ?

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Advice for Brokered CD vs CD Ladder

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JP Morgan CD Bonds at 5.25

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Brokered CDs and SIPC vs FDIC insurance

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Credit Union with 7-Month CD @ 5% APY

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Are there any good high interest parking spots for money right now for 5 or 10 year lock in (i.e. CD, or other) given the high interest rate environment?

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Putting money on a fidelity (new) CD that’s from other banks. Questions.

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I bonds vs CD’s, which makes more sense for me?

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When do brokered CD yields change?

I was right: CD Projekt is very fair valued or rather undervalued

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MGNX: An Important FDA Announcement

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MGNX: An Important FDA Announcement

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Capital One Economic Replacement Value (ERV)

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Stock: CD Projekt Red (CPR) - from games like The Witcher and Cyberpunk

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$ATNM DD

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Bank holding CDs in foreign currency to hedge exchange rate fluctuations

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u/BreadfruitSilver3812 avatarBreadfruitSilver3812 1m WSE:CDR CD Projekt RED shorts defending the long term resistance level

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WSE:CDR CD Projekt RED shorts defending the long term resistance level

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I have 50k that id like to invest

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AVCO Due Diligence

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AVCO Due Diligence

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Summary of: BriaCell Therapeutics (OTCQB: $BCTX)

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(OTCQB: $BCTX) BriaCell Therapeutics

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Fixed income attractive at these rates or wait?

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anyone looking at Cds heading into next year?

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CD rates predictions for the next year?

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Why I’m bullish on CDPR

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What are my options for cash? CD early penalty vs. T-bills/bonds?

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What are my options for cash? CD early penalty vs. T-bills/bonds?

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CD Projekt Red stock a good buy with its current rise?

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CD at 3.95% 9 month for planned home improvement

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savings bonds or CD? help me decide

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CDs and Bonds help needed

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Should I invest in I bonds or CD instead of total bond market?

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401k match with current markets

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By 2023 Treasury Bills, Corporate Bonds, and CDs will be so high that many people will bail out of the stock market.

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CDs, what am I missing here?

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Looking for a high yield for parking cash.

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The Day Wall Street’s Narrative of “Inflation is Over” Fell Apart: A Sea of Red

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Retail concompetitive T-Bill auctions vs SGOV etf

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CD Projekt SA all time low

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What to do with inheritance

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Brief Recap: BriaCell Therapeutics (OTCQB: $BCTX)

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(OTCQB: $BCTX) BriaCell Therapeutics - Synopsis

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(OTCQB: $BCTX) BriaCell Therapeutics Synopsis

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What to do with $10,000 for my newborn son?

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CD vs. 1 yr T-bill. I think I'm doing this wrong.

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What conditions lead to high Certificate of Deposit (CD) rates?

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Need some advice for short/mid term with cash

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CD Projekt might be very fair valued or rather undervalued

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Have you thought of stock alternatives such as ETF?

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50k cash, what to invest in?

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Enrolled to a CD. Total gain/loss is negative

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529 plan advice needed

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is the Witcher / Cyberpunk 2077 worth $2B?

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$BCAC: Brookline Capital Acquisition Corp (Apexigen) - Stockholder/Vote meeting July 27

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Bottom is in - SPY $500 by end of 2025

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Investing in CD Projekt Red?

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Ready to invest in CDPR but confused about the three options

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Site to compare US bonds / GIC's?

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Is $1.5M enough for retirement? Or $2.5M? I'm confused on a few things and could use some advice. I linked my spreadsheet of current expenses

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What’s your portfolio construction (# of stocks/sector weights/non-equities)?

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Deciding between CD issuers

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VUSXX vs 1 Year TBill vs CD

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Can you avoid capital gains tax from real estate by reinvesting into CD's?

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Say I have 1mil after taxes, would this be a good investment idea?

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Wall Street Week Ahead for the trading week beginning May 30th, 2022

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Wall Street Week Ahead for the trading week beginning May 30th, 2022

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Asking input regarding CD Rates...

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Listen up Children

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I'm a game developer. I'm long unity.

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Worth investing in CDs in my position?

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CD’s as investment (millennial)

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Nibbling today. Here is what I bought...

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This Company May Be About To Dominate All Digital Payments (NASDAQ: APCX)

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This Company May Be About To Dominate All Digital Payments (NASDAQ: APCX)

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Clarity on CD Interest Payments

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Dollar Cost Averaging and CDs

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Citius Pharmaceuticals Reports Topline Data from the Pivotal Phase 3 Study of Cancer Immunotherapy I/ONTAK (E7777) for the Treatment of Persistent or Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma (CTCL) in Support of BLA Submission

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Received small inheritance help??!

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(3/30) Wednesday's Pre-Market Stock Movers & News

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Japan Global Partnership Alliance Proposal in a Conglomerate Deal Approved by Max Sound Corp and マフィップ

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Japan Global Partnership Alliance Proposal in a Conglomerate Deal Approved by Max Sound Corp and マフィップ

Mentions

I call dibs on the band name: Telepathic Monkey Uprising. 1st CD will be full of tracks of silence mixed in with occasional soft hoots and banana chewing noises.

Mentions:#CD

I’ll sell you a 4.75% CD

Mentions:#CD

The safest investment is a CD if you are investing under the FDIC limits or short term Treasuries up to any amount. Money market mutual funds are safe if they are comprised of only Treasuries and if you really want to make it safe then pick one that does no repos.

Mentions:#CD

If the prevailing rate has gone below the CD issue rate at the callabiity date it is quite likely it will be called. I don't bother with them for an extra 0.05%-0.1%.

Mentions:#CD

There are callable brokered CDs. The callability is clearly shown in the offering - easy to avoid. There have always been more non-callable CDs when I have gone to buy. The callable rate is usually only 0.1% higher or less than non-callable. This should be a non-issue. Yes I have had a callable CD called in a parent's account that I was managing. The broker who bought it for us did not tell us that the offering was callable. That caused me a lot of work to rearrange cash flow when it was called.

Mentions:#CD

>I understand there is a risk that rates drop, they call the CD and there are no comparable safe places to invest but aside from that any downside? That is the huge downside... When rates drop, the bank will call the CD, and leave you with cash in hand and far worse rates to reinvest. The few points you gain with a callable, you will lose far more in the long term (unless rates keep going up, but then you lose our regardless).

Mentions:#CD

Like others mentioned, see a CFP (certified financial planner). Expect to pay a one time $2500 fee. I'd expect the CFP's advice to be to get setup on a mixture of a CD ladder and low cost ETFs. CDs right now are giving 4+% risk free. Get CDs of 1/2/3/5 yr maturities and put the rest in a mixture of JEPI(taxed as non qualifying income, but snds like her annual income is low)/SCHD in a 30/70 split. ​ They'll also advise on when she should start taking social security and review her annual finances/budgets/desires. Like basically see the $2500 as a one time review of her whole life, finances, stocks, annual budget, etc.

Mentions:#CD#JEPI#SCHD

Bond ETFs are for people who want effectively a rolling portfolios of bonds where principal is constantly being redeployed as it comes in. If you know you need the money in exactly 5 years and want to have minimal risk between now and then you could: - buy a bullet bond with 5 years of term. If you price this properly then price will bounce around but the final price is known, not just the path. - put the money in a certificate of deposit at a financial institution. Many of these are insured. You put the money in get a guaranteed return and get it back at the end. Looks like CD rates are around 4.5-4.6% annual right now. So you'd get about 25% more Then you put in back in 5 years.

Mentions:#CD

CD No. 1 yr highly likely. Bonds only. That was GO Muni offering 9 pct all got called 5 years later.

Mentions:#CD

I am about to ask a series of highly regarded questions: * Who sets the basis points for Credit Suisse CDs? * Does this mean the spread for Credit Suisse CD's are massive? * Does a large spread mean that buyers don't want these high interest rates CDs at the prices Credit Suisse is willing to sell? * Why are these rates mooning?

Mentions:#CD

I’ve never invested in a callable CD but my understanding is that when interest rates fall they are almost always called. After all: why wouldn’t the issuer call it, out of the goodness of their hearts?

Mentions:#CD

If you don't have $1000 then either buy a CD or just put your money in a high yield savings account.

Mentions:#CD

They will continue to spend as long as they feel wealthy Higher credit card bills, layoffs, lower equity price s(hitting wealth perception), declining home values and 5% CD rates will hit Americans in the face in Q1-Q2 next year. The worst enemy to an economy is inflation. The Fed knows that and given recent data it has an urgency to get rates lower. Wait for $100 oil when China opens Too many unknowns for them to say they are slowing - They would rather a declining equity market in 2023 (non-election year) and lower prices than risk the alternative Market is not nearly as bearish as it should be Jpow knows this and current equity values give him room to be very hawkish - The Santa rally last week is for the Fed

Mentions:#CD

If you are not sure about the time frame for when you want to access the funds, then stick to shorter durations. From your screenshot - it looks like either the 3 month or 6 month treasuries have a higher yield. There are other fixed income products that can have a higher yield. But if you have easy access to treasuries and brokered CDs in your Vanguard account - using treasuries and brokered CDs is a good and convinient way to start. Also - you could just go buy a 1 month treasury and or brokered CD to see how the mechanics work before you invest in longer duration products. You don't have to invest your entire 100k to just try a 1 month brokered CD or treasury. The only risk is if interest rates go down in the future so you may miss out on some yield.

Mentions:#CD

CD is better for low tax states, and t bill for high tax states, cds should be purchased through a brokerage like fidelity, Schwab, vanguard, etc. T bill should be purchased through Treasury direct

Mentions:#CD

Note where I said 3 month CD……..

Mentions:#CD

Stick 300k into a 3 month CD at 3-4% interest and you’d be able to get your 4000/month.

Mentions:#CD

In a brokered CD they are getting crazy good rates

Mentions:#CD

what is a CD

Mentions:#CD

Current I-Bond rate is 6.89%. That rate is guaranteed for 6 months. No one knows what the rate will be for the following 6 months, but it will more than likely be lower (as inflation seems to be going down). Let's say the 2nd 6 months rate drops to 4%. Your average rate for the year will be 5.44%. If you sell at the earliest possible time (after 1 year has passed), then the previous 3 months of interest will be your penalty for selling before the 5-year mark. This would equate to 1.36%. That means you'd will make 4.08% on the $10K you invest ($408). That is currently better than bank Savings rates, but not better than Brokered CDs. The most bang for the risk-free buck, might be a Brokered CD. I pulled these from TD Ameritrade. Maturity APY\* Coupon Description 3/06/2024 4.96% 4.9 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK (OH) 3/07/2024 4.858% 4.8 MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS TRUST COMPANY 12/06/2023 4.858% 4.8 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK (OH) 3/07/2024 4.858% 4.8 CUSTOMERS BANK (PA) 12/05/2023 4.75% 4.7 WELLS FARGO BANK (SD)

Mentions:#CD#SD

It kinda depends - what's your time-frame? And do you need access to the funds? If you have a short duration - then T-bills may be more appropriate. Longer duration - CD's could be better. If you are willing to take on a bit more risk - even corporate investment grade bonds could be appropriate.

Mentions:#CD

"Safer" is relative. A CD is a depository product that is issued by a bank or credit union. While unlikely, a depository can potentially go bankrupt. But the CD value is guaranteed by FDIC should a bank go bankrupt or NCUA should a credit union go bankrupt. A treasury note and/or bill is issued by the US government and backed by the full faith and credit of the US government. The likelihood that the US government will go bankrupt is lower than a bank going bankrupt which is why treasuries can be considered relatively safer.

Mentions:#CD

Well you can see short term treasuries yield more than the CD's ; if you do not want to tie your money up for a long time you get better rates on 1-6 month treasuries vs 1-6 month CDs. Also Treasuries are exempt from state sales taxes, depending on your tax bracket in CA you may be better of with a slightly lower yielding treasury (state tax exempt) vs a CD

Mentions:#CD

Unless it's a very large sum of money, I'd just put it in a HYSA. The difference in a 1Yr CD at 3.81 vs Capitol One or Citi HYSA (currently at 3.25%.) is only .56%. Even for a $100,000 deposit, the difference in what you make would be only $560. More like $400 after taxes. I'm not willing to lose my liquidity of $100,000 of my money for what amounts to \~$1/day. HYSA interest rates could fluctuate, yes, but in all likelihood if anything they will go UP some more in the next few months, since they pretty much seem to move with FED rates, which are still expected to go up for at least the next few months.

Mentions:#CD

OP, I purchased a CD (Certificate of Deposit) at 18 months (little after Spring 2024) that was non-callable at 4.85 APY. Little less then 18 months would be around 4.6-4.7 APY is my guess. This might be a better option then most high yield savings accounts I am seeing these days. For reference, BOA is around 4% and AMEX is at 3%.

Mentions:#CD

I just took down some 1 year treasuries in my Fidelity account at 4.75%. Accounting for the fact that I don't eat state income taxes, that's like a 1 year CD at 5%+.

Mentions:#CD

The Capital One 12 month CD offers 4% and the 14 month is a little higher if you don’t wanna deal with buying a TBill.

Mentions:#CD

Cap One, one year CD is 4%. Brokered one year non-callable CDs were 4.8% today. One year T-Bills are about 4.7% with no state taxes on the income.

Mentions:#CD

Yes check, but a couple of brokers I use have a statement at the top of the CD buying page that they are all FDIC insured. IIRC, all federally chartered banks are required to be FDIC insured. There used to be some state chartered banks without FDIC insurance. I don't know how many of those are still around.

Mentions:#CD

You could do 3/6 month CD's and roll into the next one once each matures instead of locking it up in one CD the whole time if you want liquidity. Would yield a little more than your savings account (but probably not by that much)

Mentions:#CD

And depdanding on your state, the T-bill will not incure state taxes unlike a CD 💪💪

Mentions:#CD

The penalty for selling an Ally 1-year CD early is 60 days of interest. It takes like 2 extra days to get your money vs. a savings or checking account.

Mentions:#CD

1 year US Treasury pays more than CD and interest is tax exempt at state level

Mentions:#CD

CD or Treasuries if you want to be a little fancier to get slightly better yields.

Mentions:#CD

I-series bonds are at 6.89% for the next 6 months before updating to a new interest rate. Little more flexibility with I-bonds compared to CD’s.

Mentions:#CD

If you have a Fidelity brokerage account already, you could just park your funds in the account until you decide on what to invest. The default Fidelity brokerage account has a money market sweep option. I.e. what that means is that all your cash in the default core position can be automatically swept into one of three money market funds. You can just make sure that you select the SPAXX or FZFXX funds which are both government money market funds. Current 7-day yield is about 3.3% - [https://www.fidelity.com/mutual-funds/fidelity-funds/money-market-funds-fcash](https://www.fidelity.com/mutual-funds/fidelity-funds/money-market-funds-fcash) ​ >CD laddering be something appropriate to consider? Yes - you can ladder with CDs or bonds. I use bond funds because it's easier for me - but these mature annually so may be inappropriate for you. But there are short duration CDs and treasuries that you can use. Since you have a Fidelity account - Fidelity has a ladder explanation here - [https://www.fidelity.com/fixed-income-bonds/cd-ladders](https://www.fidelity.com/fixed-income-bonds/cd-ladders) and a ladder tool here - [https://fixedincome.fidelity.com/ftgw/fi/FILanding#tbcds|treasury|cd-new-issue](https://fixedincome.fidelity.com/ftgw/fi/FILanding#tbcds|treasury|cd-new-issue) ​ >high yield bond funds VERY IMPORTANT NOTE - a high-yield bond is a term used to describe a junk bond. These are bonds which are considered riskier in quality. A safer bond fund are either US Treasuries (kinda like the core money market funds at Fidelity) or an investment grade corporate bond.

For most people in the U.S. I doubt borrowing money is ever going to as cheap as what they have their home rates locked in at. If I was in that situation, I would absolutely be investing that money rather than paying off such a low interest loan. I used CD's since there is near zero risk, personally I'd buy funds that I can sit on for decades. But if you wanted assume no risk, you could also buy the CD's in tax-advantaged account to avoid those taxes on gains.

Mentions:#CD

I do have a brokerage account with fidelity which also manages my retirement. I will likely need to access portions of the fund within the 6m-1y, would CD laddering be something appropriate to consider? Thank you for the money market fund suggestion, I will do more homework on it as well as high yield bond funds

Mentions:#CD

What? No! Just open a treasury direct account yourself and buy your own t-bills and notes. The interest isn't federally taxable, so when you factor that in it's better than a bank CD.

Mentions:#CD

No it isn't. If you are locked in at a low rate you are better off investing the money, you can get CD's that pay 5%.

Mentions:#CD

Hey question about brokered CDs. I read a bit and some said they were higher risk? What do they mean? Like I see a 4.8% brokered CD from Wells Fargo for 12 months through Fidelity. Is there a chance I would not get that 4.8% after a year?

Mentions:#CD

I’d be weary of cds or anything that would prevent you from pulling the money when you need it. But given the lease, a high return CD or Bonds might not be a bad choice. There is also a good chance that the market bottom will have priced itself in between now and then and you could take advantage of funds that have limited risk but high returns.

Mentions:#CD

Treasuries, CDs, HYSA are all valid options. Break it up amongst the three depending on how much accessibility you may need in the most urgent case scenario. For example, if you may need 20K at any point in the next 6 months, put that in the HYSA. If the next 40K you for sure won’t need until 6 months, check out a 6 month treasury or a CD, etc etc

Mentions:#CD

iBOND will pay more interest but loses the latest qtr which may have the same effect as a CD. Rest wait for Dec rates. My take is buy 1.5 yr fund.... Treasury perhaps. I prefer to put into stock brokerage and just order online to save the wiring, forgetting password hassle. When done it returns the money as cash in the same account.

Mentions:#CD

Brokered CDs give a higher rate than just going directly to the individual bank. You can get 4%+ on a yr brokered CD.

Mentions:#CD

Debt assets are obviously very sensitive to interest rates. To put things in perspective, if you started trading this year, or recently, you probably have the perception that bonds are as volatile as equities. Debt is normally a very stable asset. Along with real estate, it's considered very conservative. 2022 is a fairly anomalous year for a number of reasons. Part of which is the 2-year treasury yield increased over 500%. This may be unprecedented. In any case, a typical bond held to maturity will pay out face value, regardless of it's market value. In a scenario where bonds drop 38%, like this year, you can still hold to maturity and not lose anything, in which case, it still has a huge advantage over a CD.

Mentions:#CD

Where it is right now makes it accessible whenever you need it and honestly isn't much lower interest than other fixed interest w/no risk options. Another option would be to lock some up in a CD (Certificate of Deposit) or Treasury Bills that matures before you'll need it. Treasury Bills aren't the same thing as I-Bonds. You're conflating two concepts there, though they are issued by the same entity - the US Treasury. I-Bonds do have the one year lockup period and you do lose 3 months of interest if you withdraw before 5 years, but it would be an option here as long as you're willing to surrender those 3 months of interest. CD's work more like savings accounts, where you lock up your cash for a committed period of time to get a certain interest rate. Like I-Bonds, they typically contain a 3 month interest penalty if you need to withdraw the cash earlier than that. Treasury Bills are a different animal than either of those. With T-Bills, you lockup your money for a specific period of time with a fixed end date for a very specific number of weeks - 4, 8, 17, 26 or 52 weeks. You know exactly for how long you'll lock up your cash but you don't know the interest rate until the action is over. (And you need to commit your cash before the auction is over.) On the issue date, the money you've committed is taken out of the account - less the interest you're owed... so you're paid the interest up front. Then, on the maturity date - the amount of T-Bills you've purchased (for less than face value) is paid to you on the maturity date. So - let's say you committed $15,000 for 52 weeks on today's (11/29) auction. Now let's say today's bid came out as 4.5%. On the issue date - 12/01 - Treasury Direct would take $14,235 out of your account, and exactly 52 weeks from 12/01/2022 (11/30/2023), you'd receive $15,000 back to your account. Here's a great tutorial on how to buy them: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFuiC-UNeMc](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFuiC-UNeMc) Info on the latest T-Bill rates is here: [https://www.treasurydirect.gov/auctions/upcoming/](https://www.treasurydirect.gov/auctions/upcoming/) If you need to get the cash from a T-Bill earlier, you end up having to sell those on a secondary market, where you generally take a haircut on possible gains. Hope this helps to explain your options.

Mentions:#CD

CD's or Treasuries baby and wait until the next rate hike.

Mentions:#CD

This really is the best answer. Saving yields next summer could be well above what current CD and t-bills are. Ally seems to be upping their rate every few weeks. As are all the other banks. Keep it available, you never know what may happen in six months. The home market could change drastically and you may want that capital sooner than you thought.

Mentions:#CD

Sure. It’s Banesco USA Coral Gables FLA CD 4.55% exp 05/30/23

Mentions:#CD

also rates are rising, in a few months savings accounts could beat the rate you get on a 1 year CD today.

Mentions:#CD

Brokered CD is likely the easiest way to get a high percentage. If you want more fluidity, there are hysas paying above 3.25%

Mentions:#CD

Their bank Ally offers a 4% 1 year CD. That's probably the easiest option. Moving to a brokerage and buying treasuries would eke out a bit more.

Mentions:#CD

You need to monetize this and run some scenarios. At current rates I bonds will probably be your best bet, even giving up 3 months of interest. Also, in real terms the actual difference will be very little money in real terms. Compare 18 month CD at maybe 4.5 to I Bonds at 8 minus 3 months of interest (2% lost) still comes to over 6%.

Mentions:#CD

Buy a brokered CD... I have one with Fidelity until May paying 4.6%.

Mentions:#CD

sorry this is a noob question. where do i go to purchase a treasury? i was about to buy a $100K Wells Fargo CD via Vanguard for a 4.89% return. If yall are saying treasury is better, I want to look into that. help please

Mentions:#CD

Edward Jones has the best CD rates I've found. 1 year =4.7%. Usually refresh rates daily on their site. https://www.edwardjones.com/us-en/market-news-insights/stock-market-news/current-rates

Mentions:#CD

UFB has a higher HYSA rate. HYSA has way more flexibility than CD

Mentions:#CD

Small caveat on choosing CD’s in favor of other alternatives - Taxes. CDs are taxed each year regardless of if you “realize” in that year or not, and taxed at ordinary income rates. Both Fed and state. Definitely better than nothing but not the best option at the $20k number we’re talking about.

Mentions:#CD

Found a Synchrony bank 19-month CD at 4.75%. Tempted to put 20k or so in. Thoughts?

Mentions:#CD

It sounds like you are looking at secondary market brokered CDs. My understanding is that the seller gets the interest they were owed to the sale date and you get what remains to the maturity date. When looking at secondary CDs, don't look at the original interest rate. Look at the Yield to Maturity rate. I haven't see a secondary CD with yield as good as new (primary) ones.

Mentions:#CD

As a fellow Clevelander, if you're set on a CD, check out Third Federal's 3 year CD where it's 5.00% the first year and then 3.5% for the second and third years.

Mentions:#CD

Normally 10% cash. Been selling since Jan. Stopped mid yr ish I guess. I nibbled around 3600. Will again. Looking to load up below 3500. At 32% cash. Have $600k in SNOXX earning 3.15% (is okay-highly liquid no load no fee st treasury mm). Have $200k in high interest CD. $250k in investment acct to trade. Another $200k in high interest savings making 3.00% -3.50%. So yes I have dry powder. But I am 59, retired for 5 yrs and thus preservation of capital is key. Have passive income up to $115k with dividends and interest. But I will add to positions. May take 6 more months as times get tougher and earnings revisions are lowered, more layoffs occur, savings continue to dwindle rapidly. We are just at the beginning of rate increase impact and rate increases are still ongoing. It takes 6-9 months for a rate hike to filter through economy. Patience and Discipline.

Mentions:#SNOXX#CD

She could invest that money in a 20 year T bill, and get 4% interest, which is 28K a year, and is not taxable by the state. She wouldn't have to touch the principal at all. She could also invest in CD that are paying 5%, or get in to AAA corporate bonds. She might also want to ladder this, with 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 year bonds, so that she can get interest and spend some of her principal. What is she spending a year?

Mentions:#CD#AAA

i just took 5k at 0% and 3% fee for 14 months just because it's cheap. i can put the cash in a 12 month CD at 4% and make $50. STONKS

Mentions:#CD

I have a question about brokered certificate of deposit (CD). The CD that I am looking at only pays the interest at maturity. Since these CD have a set maturity date, am I going to get the same amount of interest regardless of when I purchase them? For example, if the maturity date is 12/01, would I get the same amount of interest if I invest in the CD on 6/01 vs 09/01.

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If you have a brokerage with e\*trade or TDAmeritrade you can lock in those kind of rates with CD's from the open market and its usually only about 3 - 6 months

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Not sure if anyone gave you this answer or not. Not all CD’s are FDIC guaranteed. Meaning if that bank goes belly up you loose your money. Make sure it’s FDIC guaranteed

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Go for a brokered CD. I just got 6 month at 4.6% with fidelity.

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I’m doing what the Fed wants me to do which is buy CD’s and surrender my cash.

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Investments have to factor in turnover. Having $10,000 in a CD is much more likely to be spent than $1,000,000. The longer they can hold the money, the more they can make, so the more they can return while maintaining their margin.

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They also have a no penalty 11 month CD at 3.3%. I usually open these until the rate changes again and then repeat the process.

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I joined cash gang, perhaps I will make prudent financial decisions such as buying VTI when it dips. Maybe some treasuries. Maybe even a CD ladder.

Mentions:#VTI#CD

If you could set a 10-year CD at 7:00 to 8% I think spy will drop into the hundreds Lol

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Ally bank has 3% for their savings account, no lock in like a CD

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Also, the more money you have = the more money provided by returns. When a poor person gets 3% for a $10,000 CD, it generates very little return that does not have a meaningful impact on that persons wealth. When a rich person gets 3% for a $100M investment, the return generates more money than most Americans will ever see in their life.

Mentions:#CD

Relying to your concern about inflation, what I do and what I would recommend is building a CD ladder. You can read the full strategy online but it is essentially buying CDs with varying expirations so that you always have cash become available (usually about every 3 months is the minimum ladder size). Great way to lock in higher interest rates while main thing a very liquid position (you can always exit a CD at the cost of some of the interest)

Mentions:#CD

Maybe something that will help you in thinking about inflation is this--your dollar's buying power is more affected by the basket of goods you consume. But if this doesn't help because a lot of things you buy are experiencing high inflation i.e. shelter, gas, etc then another thing to take comfort in is that the Fed is committed to fighting inflation -- so as long as inflation continues to be high, interest rates will continue to get raised. Short-term Treasuries/CD or HYSA may be your best bet in fighting inflation. All other asset class will continue to fall as interest rates rise. If interest rates do not rise because inflation continues to fall toward 2%, then your money in savings will be fine. You could also then consider looking at other asset classes.

Mentions:#CD

I don't care if it's 0% loan and CD rates are 10%, a 6 year term on an auto loan is dumb.

Mentions:#CD

Yeah, that slow time decay makes this move frozen in time for several months the way I see it. But I'm a patient guy when it comes to stocks, I can wait. I feel like I've turned it into a bizarro high yielding bond or CD until October.

Mentions:#CD

CD’s are really good right now - guaranteed 4%!

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For what term? I helped a friend get a one year 4.8% CD with Manufacturers Bank in Buffalo, NY on Friday with our local Schwab guy. The longer terms didn't pay much more or even paid less!

Mentions:#CD

In this environment, treasuries, high yield savings accounts, or CDs. Depends on basically if you may need your cash at some time in the future *immediately* and you don't know when, or if you know you need money in the future, also have a time frame when you'll need it. High yield savings is going to be the most liquid. Treasuries are what I'd purchase, and make sure you read the stipulations on a CD you may pick.

Mentions:#CD

What interest rate could I get walking into say my local bank for a CD if I had 400,000 cash it’s my mom’s money and she won’t do online anything doesn’t trust it lol she wants to make some interest

Mentions:#CD

If you have 20,000 to commit you can buy individual bonds and save both the ETF fee and the interest rate risk no matter how small. Open a brokerage account and go to the CD and Bond section and you can choose Corporates in any grade you want or treasuries. Within those choices you can pick maturities. I have mine laddered to mature over the entirety of 2023. Some in Jan, some in Mar some in June and come in the fall and winter of 23. They are also easy to sell from that account if you have a need for the money. You can buy one bond or a thousand using the same account.

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