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GDP

Goodrich Petroleum Corporation

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Mentions (24Hr)

44

37.50% Today

Volume

$0

Avg Volume

$61.6K

Market Cap

$368M

52 Week High

$26.66

52 Week Low

$8.61

Day High

$23.02

Day Low

$22.97

Previous Close

$22.99

7 Days Mentions

207

Reddit Posts

1-2 years ago Everyone looked like a genius when they were getting free unemployment money and stimulus money which inflated a huge bubble during a bull run and everyone was winning. Then shit hit the fan. Now a year later what’s next?

Bank of Canada maintains policy rate. NO RATE CHANGE!

Microsoft tops analysts' expectations in Q2 as cloud revenue soars 46%

Here's Your Daily Market Brief For January 26th

Ape brain here gaining some wrinkles. With all this talk about Russia threat to cyber attack the U.S. It reminded me of the IMF cyber attack simulation 🤔I wonder how this connect and if they were just preparing for another well calculated market cover up conspiracy.

I did an intrinsic value calculation for Netflix shares and found it undervalued.

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Here's Your Daily Market Brief For January 25th

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WashPo Breaks Out the "C" Word

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Here's Your Daily Market Brief For January 24th

Market’s Anticipation of Continuous Rate Hikes Is Wrong: Calling Out the Fed’s Bluff

Market’s Anticipation of Continuous Rate Hikes Is Wrong: Calling Out the Fed’s Bluff

Whales are out, already cashed out. 3 or r rate hikes, record national debt, due to covid spending, once rates increase, the housing bubble will pop. Then people won't qualify under new rules and flood market with listing. Jobs, GDP, earnings down, perfect. Those that remember 1982 remember 19-20%

GDP Data Release on January 27th - Forecasted to Rise 6% Annualized

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GDP Data Release on January 27th - Forecasted to Rise 6% Annualized

Investing into $BLNK great ev company with 36.34 million shares floated wow crazy shorts this is totally a good investment for future ev wow wow wow ev's only %1-3 percent in the world watch out 2035 wow crazy shorts what the freak. there revenue is def mooning we will see. $BLNK vs GDP+retail trad

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Here's Your Daily Market Brief For January 18th

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Nothing to See Here

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Technical Analysis: Why the VIX is on its way to 150 and the SPX is on its way to <2000

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Tonight's "scary data" has the risk of blowing up, how will it stir the market?

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BTFD and HODL till Fed hit 2%

$BEST inc is one of the top undervalued plays IMO: high short float; big revenue; and potential bullish surprises. Some brief dd

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$BEST inc is one of the top undervalued plays IMO: high short float; big revenue; and potential bullish surprises. Some brief dd

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$BEST inc is one of the top undervalued plays IMO: high short float; big revenue; and potential bullish surprises. Some brief dd

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$BEST inc is one of the top undervalued plays IMO: high short float; big revenue; and potential bullish surprises. Some brief dd

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40 years of change: the last time the CPI "7 times" what happened?

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Why are China stocks going up while China is imposing Covid Zero Policy?

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Today's focus: All stocks in the green, Powell testimony not hawkish enough?

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Last night and this morning: Powell's testimony not hawkish enough? Good situation for global equities----For shring

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Rising interest rates? Remember the long-term trend.

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The Fed is trapped, they have to hike rates, but they wont make it very far before breaking the markets this time. I predict only 5 rate hikes this cycle, details below

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Is it different this time? A wider perspective.

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Hiring falters in December as payrolls rise only 199,000, though the unemployment fell to 3.9%

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$DTGI Digerati Closes Acquisition of SkyNet Telecom

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Going against the tide on growth. Simply do not care.

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Last night and this morning: U.S. stocks 2022 had a scare to open! Tesla rises 13% higher----For sharing.

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Freddie and Fannie

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Economist slash GDP est Q1 22’ Omicron’s Spread Will Slam First-Quarter GDP. Here’s How Bad Things Look. https://www.barrons.com/articles/omicron-covid-first-quarter-gdp-economy-51640739855?st=m0o9m1y0n9ph106

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Hypothetical scenario of how Apple would become a Company worth far more than current World GDP in 50 years.

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Mega cap growth in the next 10-30 years?

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Lemonade dd ($LMND) a speculative play in the old insurance market.

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Palantir Technologies (PLTR): What's it worth? "Warren B" Analysis

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BABA, the PERFECT opportunity

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China's Currency Trouble.

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Last night and this morning: see the Christmas carnival market again! U.S. stock indexes reap three straight gains----For share

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Here is a Market Recap for today Thursday, Dec 23, 2021. Merry Christmas!

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Here is a Market Recap for today Thursday, Dec 23, 2021. Merry Christmas!

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Summary of market change news--For share

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Last night this morning: the US stock index rose two consecutive! Tesla surged more than 7%

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Here is a Market Recap for today Wednesday, December 22, 2021

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Here is a Market Recap for today Wednesday, Dec 22, 2021

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GDP 3rd estimate better than expected (2.3 v 2.1) + FDA Pill Approvals + COVID + BBB + Tesla

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Buy put or call? Tools to find out where the market will (probably) head

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Are we heading into bull or bear market? Tools to help you decide for yourself

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US 3Q GDP grows 2.3%, decelerating GDP growth was led by a slow down in consumer spending

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Here is a Market Recap for today Tuesday, Dec 21, 2021. Please enjoy!

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Here is a Market Recap for today Tuesday, Dec 21, 2021. Please enjoy!

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Here's Your Daily Market Brief For December 21st

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Here's Your Daily Market Brief For December 20th

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Why a financial crisis is bound to happen sooner or later

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The Death of the Dollar

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The Death of the Dollar

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On the Buffet Indicator and the current "Strongly Overvalued" Stock Market

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Debt & credit cycles and the role they play in portfolio strategy

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If You Think Inflation Will Stay Around Longer Than Your Dad, Buy $TLT Puts

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Inflation is Not Going Away Soon

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The Current State of Semiconductors

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The Current State of Semiconductors

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The Current State of Semiconductors

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Considering SPY 2023 LEAPS

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AAPL The Greatest Short of All Time

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Dollar Static Ahead of Key CPI Release; Sterling Flat After GDP Data

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Pensions - Should I be overweight home country?

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Credit Suisse sees S&P 500 reaching 5200 in 2022, citing economic growth

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Went all-in on $BABA

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Went all-in on $BABA

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Is the party coming to an end?

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Buy the Dip or Sell the Rip?

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Chinese stocks in turmoil

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u/Reduntu requested the graph with credit balance as a % of GDP and the S&P on a log scale. Sources, Finra margin stats, St Louis Fred quarterly GDP and Standard & Poors.

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Chinese Developer and Holding Company Sunshine 100 Defaults on Its Debt

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My Eureka Moment: Crypto, Equities, Inflation, and the FED's Monetary Policy

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SITC (1308, HK, BUY, 70% upside) – Loading up

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Comparing macro trends from 08 to 21

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Imminent Stock Market Crash

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Calculate inflation by simply comparing the cost of everything to money supply – your opinions?

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Why will stock markets fall drastically in 2021?

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🕵️‍♂️ 🦃 I SPY TA - Friday Nov. 26, 2021

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🕵️‍♂️ 🦃 I SPY TA - Friday Nov. 26, 2021

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🕵️‍♂️ 🦃 I SPY TA - Friday Nov. 26, 2021

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PPGH-Gogoro Expansion/Partnership into India, China & Indonesia DD

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Here's Your Daily Market Brief For November 23rd

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Here's Your Daily Market Brief For November 22nd

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A new type of analysis method about the country market for potential futures price changes

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US debt spiral, money printing, how does it end?

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Wall Street Week Ahead for the trading week beginning November 22nd, 2021

Mentions

I can imagine how fuck the GDP growth is gonna to be... Fuckery fucking fucked

Mentions:#GDP

AAPL earning is pivotal tomorrow. Not only it's the largest holding in the biggest index EFTs, but also it is strongly tied to consumer sentiment, especially discretionary spend, which is a key indicator to US GDP (70% from consumer spending).

Mentions:#AAPL#GDP

Sure GDP may drop but that's temporary. Employment and wages at all time highs. And really some perspective... interest rates going up 1% in a year! And we were told about this already. Look at the rates in the early 80's... 15%!

Mentions:#GDP

GDP will be reported for Q1 at the end of Feb. Economists predict GDP growth will be much much lower than Q1 since we will start feeling the effects of omnicron on the market. This + no more QE, means the feds can’t save the market when this happens, and on top of that they’re increasing interest rates.

Mentions:#GDP

USG debt to GDP is over 100% now. Every 1% the rate increases the USG has gotta pay +$530B in interest alone. Not only is the USG fooked, corporate America is jacked to the tits on debt. Wait until rate hikes start taking out all of these zombie POS companies that won't be able to pay their bills. Fed is gonna try to do pussy control moves to keep inflation at bay. It won't work.. then the fed is gonna have to raise rate hard and the USG and corporate America goes insolvent. Debt crisis ensues. There won't be a bull for miles.

Mentions:#GDP

America is exactly where Silicon Valley tech companies make the bulk of their money. Even Europe isn't that profitable of a market despite their relatively decent GDP per capita.

Mentions:#GDP

So realistically do you guys think there will be any pulp if the GDP comes in good? I can’t imagine the crap show if the numbers come in bad

Mentions:#GDP

Lost in the chaos is that Q4 GDP comes out tomorrow

Mentions:#GDP

Are jobless claims and GDP both premarket? Sorry I’m being lazy and not looking it up but I’m a couple drinks deep.

Mentions:#GDP

Here are some quotes from the meeting and my thoughts. “I think there is quite a bit of room to raise interest rates without affecting the labor market.” This brings into question if we will have more than 3 rates hikes this year, and if so, how large will they be. “We are willing to move sooner and perhaps faster when reducing the balance sheet this time” In 2018 and the last reduction we had a sell off as a reaction. “Market is pricing in a number of rate hikes and a balance sheet contraction later this year”…..”We feel that the communications we have with the public and markets ‘are working’” To me this means he is validating everything we believed was going happening. Powell also did not refute the idea we could have 4-5 rate hikes either, he simply said that the market is pricing everything accordingly without going further into detail. Tomorrow we get jobless claims, durable goods and GDP numbers. I was initially bullish with the FOMC statements, but after reviewing I think we could go lower all the way to Mid-February to early March.

Mentions:#GDP

Japan provides a great example of how well 3 decades of qe and blowing the national debt past 100% of GDP work to restore markets. But I'm sure it'll be different for the US

Mentions:#GDP

Just GDP predictions, don’t think they release actual numbers for 4qtr 2021 until the end of March.

Mentions:#GDP

GDP tomorrow, redder than the devils asshole until next year.

Mentions:#GDP

Great, BEA is set to release 4qtr GDP estimates tomorrow morning. Its best to lube up now so it has time to soak in, trust me.

Mentions:#GDP

Are you saying US is only 8% of global GDP and that China is bigger? Where are you getting those numbers? Nearly every source I can find, albeit some as old as 2020 have US at about 23-25% of global GDP and China about 15%

Mentions:#GDP

The double edge sword of GDP numbers tomorrow. 1. If they are good, it runs the same narrative of inflation as it will remain high - market tanks. 2. If they are bad, there’s zero business and consumer confidence which is why we have to go aggressive against China, market tanks. This is why futes are red.

Mentions:#GDP

They account for such a big portion of our total GDP that if they ever decide to “balance the books” we’ll be in an instant recession. With 9 trillion on the books and nothing said today that is finite - I agree with you. While he came out as more hawkish in his comments he pretty much said the same things again. They just use these meetings to catch up on how their families are doing I guess

Mentions:#GDP

Are US dollar used to be the world reserve currency because you could only buy oil with it hence name the petrodollar. Now that he’s just getting out of that as well as the treasury bond market. On top of that when the US dollar started as world reserve currency Its GDP was 24% globally and now has shrunk to 8% with China surpassing it. The US dollar Has been slowly failing since Nixon released it’s backing completely from gold in 1971

Mentions:#GDP

GDP date tomorrow. So futures more irrelevant than ever

Mentions:#GDP

You seriously getting excited about GDP when literally every piece of economic data we have gotten recently has been pure shit?

Mentions:#GDP

GDP doesn't really matter tbh. Last report just kinda got ignored

Mentions:#GDP

Yup. But he’s waiting for his GDP index to hit the right level again, but it won’t. The market is no longer free and won’t be allowed to reach that level.

Mentions:#GDP

Oh shit GDP is tomorrow. We mooning 🚀

Mentions:#GDP

could be tomorrow if we get some bad GDP numbers

Mentions:#GDP

I bought my 2 shares of GME knowing full well where this is all going. The black horse rides. Money fails in the realms of men. The sun becomes black. Rivers of blood under a full red moon. Cats and dogs living together. Under 0.5% GDP growth for the next 3 years. Playing musical chairs and the only seat left when the music stops is Joe Biden's lap and our hair smells amazing. Mountains falling into the see and a third of the forests burn. Buy the dip. Everything is fine.

Mentions:#GME#GDP

What will they do if the first rate increase already has a recessionary impact and GDP growth slows to a trickle and debt spirals out of control? How on earth do you RAISE rates as the CB behind the global reserve currency without: 1. Leading your own economy to default 2. Leading the countries around you to default / recession, in the process leading your own economy to default. I still need an answer from some luminary on here, how will the Fed and the US government handle the higher rates? Is there precedent with this much debt, no right? Calling for rate increases is easy, implementing them not. Please share your predictions of what will happen if we get four rates.

Mentions:#GDP#CB

\> Printing 75% of all base money in a single year \> Debt to GDP of 125% \> $3T deficit 3 years in a row now \> Our only export is dollars (which we just passed 1T trade deficit this past month) \> "Temporary" QE that has lasted 13 years now, and they "pinky promise" they are tapering it now (monetizing the debt) \> Wealth inequality, skewed towards the 1% with an r\^2 of .99998 with the fed balance sheet What even is a banana republic? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana\_republic

Mentions:#GDP

Oh yeah I see what you're saying in theory I would agree with you but I don't know if the gross domestic production numbers would sway Jerome one way or another rather he's really looking at the CPI and employment GDP be damned Because the GDP is always going to be impacted by whether or not there's an actual physical stimulus in effect and the corresponding labor output both of which are going to get impacted by Corona

Mentions:#GDP

Yeah that’s what I figured at first, but what about rates? If GDP is high, the economy is good, then clearly raising rates should happen to control inflation. I viewed it as high GDP = higher rates.

Mentions:#GDP

No a high GDP would be incredibly bullish. But the expectations are that it's going to be lower *Stagflation*

Mentions:#GDP

I have no idea. High GDP = bearish?

Mentions:#GDP

Did everyone forget GDP numbers tomorrow before open? Bet they'll be huge and that's why jpow was edgy today.

Mentions:#GDP

Powell just made it very clear he's going to raise rates. I don't know what to tell you. He said he thinks it's appropriate to stop buying bonds and to increase rates. When he stops buying mortgage backed securities it's definitely going to impact the mortgage market and rates will go up even more than he would like. Please remember he controls the fed funds rate but not interest rates in general. Once rates start to climb housing will prices and sales will fall fast. Since estimates suggest that housing makes up around 20% of GDP you can and should expect a massive ripple effect.

Mentions:#GDP

Wait if the GDP numbers are bad tomorrow

Mentions:#GDP

Which parts would you cut? Play the game: https://us.abalancingact.com/2022-federal-budget On the spending side: The federal government is an insurance company with an army. - Cut social spending like social security and old people starve. Unpopular. Also those dollars go straight into the economy with high velocity. Cutting that cuts GDP more. - Cut health insurance and people get sick and die. Also unpopular. And as we’ve seen in the pandemic, sick people hurt the economy. - Cut military and the US is at risk. Everything else is rounding. On the revenue side, well, the IRS code picks lots of winners and losers through loopholes. For example, why are capital gains taxed at a lower rate than labor? Are we discouraging work or encouraging collecting rent and if so, why?

Mentions:#GDP

I listened to the main speaker as well as the Q and A afterwards. I don't necessarily disagree with anything he said and it is correct that China does have a (by a fairly sizable amount now) larger economy if you measure GDP adjusted by Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) rather than just nominally GDP. That's pretty important as it means in real terms China is producing much more than the US now. However, he never states that China has an aversion to Imperialism. He says that the CCP (and China as a whole) sees itself as turning around from the humiliation of the late 1800's and early 1900's to becoming a strong and respected power again. Yes they do hate that imperialist era but it is more that they were on the wrong end of it, and if you ever look at the comment sections of Chinese news or Social Media there is definitely a feeling that it is now "their turn". The speaker actually alludes to that by saying that if anything the CCP has actually put a lid on Chinese nationalism on the global stage but increasingly you can see the party and especially leaders like Xi play into that nationalism (for example see how the CCP blamed Omicron showing up in China on a letter from Canada and how many Chinese on social media started attacking the country). See also how he said that every single Chinese person he's talked to believes without a doubt that the US intentionally bombed the Chinese embassy in Belgrade. He trys to point to the lack of overseas adventures in Chinese history to say they won't be militarily aggressive but to me that falls flat as overseas empires are actually the exception, not the rule, for Imperialism. Places like China and Russia have been empires for centuries but they traditionally preyed on their neighbors as it was normally easier to do so. There were very unique conditions in Europe and the world (technological and population growth and th disparity in them between Europe and the rest of the world) during the 1600's - 1800's made overseas empires more logical for the European powers. Additionally the speaker is mostly talking about what the US should do before China is number 1 in nominal terms (understandably since it is at a US university), and here he is basically reiterating over and over to not give China any justification for things. At one point he even says that if the US doesn't stop the freedom of navigation cruises (which I might add are totally legal and done to support Taiwan and other countries' claims in the South China Sea) to expect Chinese warships to be patrolling off the coast of California in 20 years as a response. Finally, and this is important, the speaker is using the past 30 years of US-Chinese relations to predict the future of those relations when the relationship is clearly undergoing a pivot *right now*. He talks of the deference of the Chinese leadership to America during that time but it is also clear that China is becoming increasingly independent and agressive for its own agendas. That falls perfectly in line with what I have read has been the strategy that the Chinese leadership laid out even in the 1980's, which was to be deferential and work with the West as they needed the money, growth, and power that came with exporting so many goods to us, but then eventually once they became powerful enough to pivot to their own agendas and what they really wanted to do. Now that China is clearly #1 or close to it and their economy is pivoting more towards Africa and domestic trade within China rather than exports to the West the leadership's behavior and rhetoric is changing accordingly.

Mentions:#GDP

There are 4 US companies sporting market caps higher than the entire Russian GDP. Their economy is pathetic. Hard avoid.

Mentions:#GDP

Nobody cares about Canada, they have the GDP of a Robinhood account

Mentions:#GDP

Canada is basically recession proof since their entire GDP is migrating goose exports

Mentions:#GDP

Institutions, fiscal and monetary policy, GDP and technological advancements are a few that come to mind.

Mentions:#GDP

I think the GDP info coming out tomorrow might be as important as the FOMC today, given the fact that people are calling stagflation.

Mentions:#GDP

Most likely the case. Are they going to guide on GDP and Inflation forecast? Canadian just announced .25%, I think that part is known for US Fed, .25 in March and Data dependent but guidance is what’s worrying.

Mentions:#GDP

I think it was this one: https://youtu.be/RO3izbn201s I’d love you hear your thoughts. The speaker should say something along the lines of “China has already superseded the US in terms of GDP” If he doesn’t then I probably gave you the wrong video (it’s been a while and i don’t have time right now to really check)

Mentions:#GDP

In response to that change in tone, markets have quickly priced in more rapid policy tightening. The rise in long-term real interest rates has been notably sharp. Yields on ten-year Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS), which were around -1% at the start of the year, are now -0.6%. Stockmarkets have had to adjust to this. Higher long-term rates reduce the present value of future corporate cashflows, making shares less valuable. The effect is especially marked for the shares of tech companies, which are priced for profit growth long into the future. Hence the violence of the NASDAQ’s decline. The Fed is not the only concern. Much of the run-up in markets last year was predicated on a stronger economy and handsome revenues and profits. Extraordinary growth in America was fuelled by low interest rates, pent-up demand and a bumper $1.9trn fiscal-stimulus package. Such impulses are fading. Economists at JPMorgan Chase, a bank, forecast that GDP growth in America will fall from 5.7% in 2021 to 3.7% this year and 2.5% in 2023. There are already some signs that a slowdown is under way. Activity in America’s service industries has fallen to an 18-month low, according to the latest survey of purchasing managers. Retail sales slumped in December. Consumer confidence is low. Some of this can be put down to the Omicron wave. But it may also reflect an ebbing in underlying demand. As investors consider the demand outlook for the coming months, there is a lot less to excite them. Profits will be squeezed by a slowing economy, and thus slowing revenue, but also by rising costs. Higher oil and commodity prices add to raw-material costs. A bigger headache is labour. The tight jobs market is bidding up the salaries of increasingly scarce workers. “There is real wage inflation everywhere,” lamented David Solomon, boss of Goldman Sachs, on a call to investors last week. His bank had just reported a blowout year for profits, but the nerves of investors were jangled by the one-third increase in Goldman’s wage bill last year. Other businesses that also rely more on brainpower than physical capital will feel the pinch, providing yet another reason why tech shares, especially those of fledgling firms, have come under such selling pressure. A third big concern is valuation. Stocks in America look terrifyingly expensive. A measure popularised by Robert Shiller of Yale University puts America’s stock prices at a steep 36 times their earnings, adjusted for the business cycle. That is above the reading before the 1929 stockmarket crash (though still lower than the valuation reached at the peak of the dotcom boom of the late 1990s). A reckoning was due, especially for expensive-looking, unproven businesses. ARK Innovation, an exchange-traded fund that invests in young tech firms, has become the shorthand for the more speculative end of the market. It is down by 55% from its peak. There is also greater scepticism about the more established—or at least more familiar—names, such as Netflix and Zoom, which did well from the stay-at-home economy, but have suffered recently. “In short”, notes Michael Wilson of Morgan Stanley, a bank, “the froth is coming out of an equity market that simply got too extended on valuation.” A concern is that the current selling will feed on itself and cause a rout. Is there anything that might improve the market mood? There are some bits of good news that investors might eventually cling to. Omicron may prove to be the last wave of the pandemic. As it fades, so might the labour bottlenecks behind some of the recent inflation. Reopening can happen in earnest. There are tentative signs that China’s economy is bottoming out. Many emerging markets have already been through a painful adjustment. The EU’s “Next Generation” fund, which will disburse €750bn ($880bn) to member states, still has a lot of fiscal fuel in the tank. A lot of the better news comes from outside America, though. It may not do much for the NASDAQ. And it is hard to feel bullish about Europe with Russian troops amassed on Ukraine’s border. For now, though, the focus is firmly on the Fed, which concludes its rate-setting meeting on January 26th. Investors nursing hefty losses might hope for a less hawkish tone from Jerome Powell, the central bank’s chairman, and colleagues. Is that likely? The Fed would have reason to worry if the corporate-bond market had come badly unstuck, because it is a vital conduit for funding. But corporate-bond spreads have been fairly stable. Falling stock prices by themselves are—or should be—less of a concern to policymakers. Indeed a market correction might even suit the Fed’s purposes, if it brings the people who have retired early on their stockmarket gains back into work. Or perhaps Mr Powell will blink. We won’t have to wait long to find out.

Mentions:#TIPS#GDP

This is just dumb... It's not about knowing... It's about probability. Why do you think earnings are a thing? It's solving for the unknown in people's models... What's the probability that Tesla can achieve 54% growth in revenue today given 7% inflation and growth in GDP? This can be modeled by taking the margins on the vehicles, surveying which models were purchased, correlation of various commodities, etc. Many variables you can model to come up with a probability. You are making probabilistic bets over a long horizon... These bets have simple assumptions, and your assumptions need to have actual logic behind them. Pros do this very extensively.

Mentions:#GDP

It cost them about 10x what it did time, so assuming that's a constant ratio they can do it at most twice more before the price tag exceeds US GDP.

Mentions:#GDP

No one cares about Canadians dude. Go sit your ass down. The entire economy not even up to Californias GDP. Bitch please.

Mentions:#GDP

Can you share those clear signs of disinflationary (do you mean deflationary) and weak economic macro data? >The all items index rose 7.0 percent for the 12 months ending December, the largest 12-month increase since the period ending June 1982. The all items less food and energy index rose 5.5 percent, the largest 12-month change since the period ending February 1991. The energy index rose 29.3 percent over the last year, and the food index increased 6.3 percent. [sauce](https://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm) US GDP rose approx 10% in a year, [sauce](https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/GDP) and US unemployment rate has declined to 3.9 percent, [sauce](https://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/empsit.pdf).

Mentions:#GDP

Honestly I'm not even sure a 50 BP hike announcement would lead to a big plunge at this point. Unless it were announced to take place literally tomorrow. Even then... Now if we get some downward GDP revisions, announcement of target inflation of ~4%, etc.... Now then things would get interesting. KangGang prevails otherwise, with unchanged prices in March, just with lots of vol between here and there. That's my guess anyway.

Mentions:#BP#GDP

they need to offload Fed balance sheet, meanwhile they are still tapering ... they will never do either. system is too accustomed. FED has monetized nearly 50% of GDP

Mentions:#GDP

Here's some info from a previous post about $BEST inc: "Smart logistics/freight/ecommerce/supply chain services company backed by BABA; BABA owns 10million shares of $BEST inc, and is partnered with them in essentially every major SE Asian country. Recent $1.1 billion deal for their DOMESTIC express unit of the business; $BEST did not sell their INTERNATIONAL express unit(s)--many people are unaware of this. This deal will virtually wipe out their debts, and leave the company with around 600million in cash. Current revenue in the billions. Estimated to be around $2 billion in 2022. Market cap 300million; P/S ratio is around 0.07 Founder/CEO/Chairman of $BEST inc was the global vice president and Greater China president of Google. $BEST has expanded into basically every SE Asian country--if you're been following the recent developments there, the RCEP, then this should be a very bullish indicator. Many of $BEST's institutional investors continue to hold rather large positions here: Goldman, Vanguard, Blackrock, Alibaba--all hold millions of $BEST's shares. Company is currently unprofitable; but this could change quite soon. Short float is around 20% on Finviz! We could squeeze the shorts! They're being quiet; they're not defending their stock price--could a full buyout be coming? $BEST will have a lot of cash soon: 600million+. What if they do a buyback and then relist some shares on Hong Kong? One of these points I'm especially bullish about is the RCEP: an enormous free trade agreement which is effective in 2022. $BEST has expanded into many of these countries. This region will grow into an enormous economic powerhouse; the percentage of global GDP alone in this region attests to why I'm bullish about $BEST's decision to expand into these regions."

Mentions:#BABA#SE#GDP

If they didn't want Ukraine, they wouldn't have seized large parts of the country. Imagine Mexico taking back Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, and still wondering if they were actually serious about the land grab. Putin is slow-walking the annexation of Ukraine so it won't blow up in his face, but he absolutely wants that country back inside Russian borders, or at least set up as a vassal state. The short answer of why invade Ukraine is to force them to buy Russian oil, and to benefit from Ukraine's GDP. The long answer is that Putin wants to see Europe/NATO broken apart as countries disagree on the response, and even disagree on the definition of Europe.

Mentions:#GDP

Look at the Buffett index. Equity cap vs. GDP.

Mentions:#GDP

Looking at the 5Y chart, tell me one invention greater than the internet which would justify that level of a gain. GDP only grows at the rate of Innovation. No Innovation, the whole shit is FAKE. All bullshit pumps starting in 2017... Tldr: no new tech = 📉📉📉

Mentions:#GDP

Mate, US GDP vs. Market cap is irrelevant no matter how you cut it, especially compared to historic levels. Internet businesses can serve customers internationally with virtually zero marginal cost. That creates a completely different environment than we had in 2000 and earlier. The top 5 stocks on the S&P500 are mega cap growth so they are highly representative of the index. You have companies like Google which have grown revenues at 20% per year for decades on huge margins. It's just not comparable to anything we saw in the past. You could buy these companies at a 30 PE today and like clockwork they double EPS within 5 years while buying back tons of stock. And companies growing at 20% per year are much more focused on growth than optimizing EPS. Your CAPE ratio completely ignores the fact that companies like AMZN are reinvesting into revenue growth. They don't care about current earnings because network effects are what builds Trillion dollar businesses not a steady dividend.

USA’s Debt to GDP was 20% when Volcker stopped holding back interest rates. Try that same shit now and see what happens.

Mentions:#GDP

Don't worry, not going to crash tomorrow, that's Thursdays job with GDP gonna be WAAAAAY under the 5% level they estimate

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Sure. The company with the GDP of a small country in CASH in its account is gonna "crash".

Mentions:#GDP#CASH

We're not even close to the biggest bubble of all time. Are you looking at linear scales and forgetting that GDP grows exponentially?

Mentions:#GDP

You got it! Thanks for reading my note, I agree with your premise that the fed will be dovish. Part of their strategy also might be 'over promise and underdeliver'. For them, its a lot better that they guide hawkish and then give the markets a pleasant surprise, than to guide dovish and surprise markets with a rate hike. I think they will raise rates early this year maybe once or twice before figuring out that the inflation and GDP number suddenly aren't looking so good

Mentions:#GDP

It's **supposedly** $1.6T according to https://coinmarketcap.com/ That seems like a lot, am I just being naive? Germany's GDP is $3T for comparison, though idk if it's in any way a valid comparison. Disclaimer: I'm not a cryptobro, I actually quite dislike crypto. I'm just surprised that $1.6T would be considered "so tiny it isn't even worth talking about".

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They issue a bond. I pay $100 for it. Government spends that money and adds $125 of value to our economy. I make $105 in a few years. Win win Currently GDP to deft ratio is on the high side but not the worst

Mentions:#GDP

MSFT just lost market cap equal to a small country's GDP.

Mentions:#MSFT#GDP

>Markets ≠ economy. Until we actually see unemployment increasing, GDP turning negative, businesses slowing/ failing, there really shouldn't be a worry that this market correction is anything but transitory. This statement is contradictory. You say markets ≠ economy, but then point to economic signifiers to make a point about the stability of the market. As you pointed out (markets ≠ economy) it does not take a bad economy to signal an impending market crash, quite the contrary. Unemployment prior to the 2008 financial crises was very low, \~4.5%. It wasn't until after the crash that unemployment skyrocketed \~10% in 2009-2010 ([https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/UNRATE](https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/UNRATE)) . Same with GDP ([https://www.futuresbuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GDP\_08162019.png](https://www.futuresbuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GDP_08162019.png)) . In 2001, GDP, unemployment, business growth (the real ones not the pumped dot com names) were turning record profits. The point is a recession doesn't precede a crash (in most cases). The economy usually is seemingly functioning completely fine until one day it just isn't. Signs of a cracking start to show in macro areas and eventually fester until they wreak havoc in the markets. Once the markets react (fall) a recession usually follows. This can be seen in any historical graph of indexes overlaid with recessions, like this one: [https://www.google.com/search?q=historical+s%26p+chart+with+recessions&rlz=1C1CHBF\_enUS911US911&sxsrf=AOaemvIMBqRgwo7ACI\_3IgihP1xOHeO\_Ng:1643148537928&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjc3Kmn9c31AhWNUt8KHRZ\_AuMQ\_AUoAnoECAEQBA&biw=2558&bih=1218&dpr=1#imgrc=D\_DRtK6xcAQB8M](https://www.google.com/search?q=historical+s%26p+chart+with+recessions&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS911US911&sxsrf=AOaemvIMBqRgwo7ACI_3IgihP1xOHeO_Ng:1643148537928&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjc3Kmn9c31AhWNUt8KHRZ_AuMQ_AUoAnoECAEQBA&biw=2558&bih=1218&dpr=1#imgrc=D_DRtK6xcAQB8M) ) Another thing worth pointing out by looking at is the image in the link below. A bear market (20% drop in an index) generally occurs simultaneously with a recession. Going back to the 1920s, there are only a handful of bear markets that occurred without a recession also occurring. The problem? The crash usually occurs before the recession, so you won't know until you're in it. So if we start nearing a 20% decline in the S&P and DOW then a longer recovery may be in store. [https://www.kaydanwealthmanagement.com/history-of-u-s-bear-bull-markets-since-1926/](https://www.kaydanwealthmanagement.com/history-of-u-s-bear-bull-markets-since-1926/)

Mentions:#GDP#ACI#DOW

> We are in the middle of discussing an example of exactly why it IS useful to them. You can't say "Your example of usefulness is wrong, because it's useless" lol. It isn't useful to them dude. It isn't useful to anyone. We've already been over this. >I know econ 101 just fine. Apparently you don't, since you are incapable of summarizing the parts of it you think support your argument. No you don't. Can't help but lie huh? >Since 1800, the $USd has inflated 210,000%. You're trying to fucking argue to me that velocity of money has risen 2,100x since 1800? I'd love to see your source on this. And I never said there has been zero inflation. But once you factor in the amount productivity, GDP, and the velocity of money have increased, the inflation rate is far below the increase in money supply. >For every horseshoe someone bought back then, I make TWO THOUSAND transactions on Amazon and shit now on average? Someone is figuring out how economic growth effects inflation! Look at this guy! He's slowly starting to learn things! >+10% inflation followed by -10% inflation back and forth is vastly more "under control" than 4%, 4%, 4%, 4%, 4%. 10% deflation would cause a massive recession leading to a deflationary spiral. Money by design should have some inflation because money is meant to be spent either on consumables or on productive assets. Not hoarded like a moron would think. You really are a next level dumbass.

Mentions:#GDP#TWO

World GDP contracted by 3.12% in 2020. There was 1 quarter where growth rates were negative by more than 15-20% but the year overall was nowhere close to that. With 2021 growth of 5.88% GDP should be above pre-pandemic levels by now. https://www.statista.com/statistics/273951/growth-of-the-global-gross-domestic-product-gdp/

Mentions:#GDP

“Pre pandemic levels” but not in relation to the massive drop of 15-20% in many markets. While 4% I. Theory is “better” the global GDP is still well below pre pandemic amounts

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El Salvador, he keeps buying to average down but i think his average is around 46-50K, literally the same buy price as the average HODL'er. On the bright side, i dont think its as big as the countries GDP, i heard the position isnt actually that large and this is all just a marketing trick to promote his Bitcoin City and Bitcoin bonds.

Mentions:#GDP

Random thought: Anyone checked on that random Central American President that pretty much yoloed his countries GDP into bitcoin? How they doing?

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MSFT yearly income puts it in the TOP 60 countries by GDP.

Mentions:#MSFT#GDP

1 quarter of MSFT income is roughly equal to the entire GDP of Afghanistan.

Mentions:#MSFT#GDP

We also get initial Q4 GDP numbers Thursday morning everyone keeps forgetting about

Mentions:#GDP

Can anyone tell me why people think we will have huge downward push when GDP is expected to grow 4% this year? I am holding my portfolios and didn't panic sell and I have been green for last two days and expect pretty good return long term.

Mentions:#GDP

With GDP expected to raise about 4%(IMF) here is no reason to be bearish, market is more likely to produce positive results this year than not.

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Eh, Russia has a GDP less than Florida.

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To be fair, the numbers they use to normalize for real GDP are definitely lower than true inflation numbers. If you look at things like rent, housing, cars, all of those have double digit inflation.

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That would be really sad but it seems like it's the plan. Massive asset inflation not picked up by CPI. High GDP growth where almost all economic gains are capture by the top ~10% of the population.

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Ukraine has a GDP of like $160 billion, Russia is like $1.4 trillion. Who cares what those third world countries are up to.

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bro....real GDP is normalized for inflation, holy shit tits...... you're thinking of nominal GDP

Mentions:#GDP

Normalizing real GDP to inflation, 4.4% doesn't look good at all.

Mentions:#GDP

Huh. 4.4% real global GDP growth still looks to be somewhat above the pre pandemic average. I wonder if we get high growth plus high inflation.

Mentions:#GDP

Market has already priced in a lot of bad. Only way I see the market crashing further is from a recession. But we just don't have that. Markets ≠ economy. Until we actually see unemployment increasing, GDP turning negative, businesses slowing/ failing, there really shouldn't be a worry that this market correction is anything but transitory. There's a big difference between the macro in 08 and what we are seeing now. Yes, inflation is elevated but that is expected when supply got blindsided by demand from the pandemic and easy money policies. But, if my hypothesis is correct, omicron should be the last of this covid mess as most will have either gotten covid or the vax at this point. With minimal interrupts from this pandemic going further, supply chains can only improve. Inflation can really only go down, especially with interest rates beginning to rise again. Do people really expect the Feds to botch this up and raise rates 5% overnight?

Mentions:#GDP

But you guys, we are only at 130% debt to GDP, we have so much room to borrow /s

Mentions:#GDP

Look up debt to GDP ratio.

Mentions:#GDP

There is a massive ocean of corporate debt. The USG is awash in debt with debt to GDP over 100%. If rates rise to control inflation, debt burdens can skyrocket out of control. Yet if the fed doesn't control inflation, then inflation will ravage the economy. Stupid fucks leveraged the shit out of their businesses and the country. Now the piper must be paid. Wait until 2022 turns into a historic debt crisis contagion that roils the global economy and sets off a massive recession. USG has gotta get the national debt under control. This is exactly why its so fucking stupid to carry this much debt. And we have a lotta idiots in the govt who believe in insane shit like Modern Monetary Theory.

Mentions:#GDP
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