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r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 30, 2024

r/investingSee Post

I need 5 interested investors with at least $50,000 down for investment

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 29, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of January 27, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 26, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

I'm the $2k to $50k Options Account Challenge Guy and I Have Some Gains to Share From My Larger Account

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Where to trade stocks late on SEC filings?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 25, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

COSTCO Stock Analysis: 571$ Fair Value - DCF, Graham, Fear & Greed, DuPont

r/StockMarketSee Post

COSTCO Stock Analysis: 571$ Fair Value - DCF, Graham, Fear & Greed, DuPont

r/stocksSee Post

COSTCO Stock Analysis: 571$ Fair Value - DCF, Graham, Fear & Greed, DuPont

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Hope y'all are still buying AKAM calls no matter the expiry, next prediction...

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 24, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

$2K to $50K in 90 Days - Options Trading Challenge (Day 1 +$250 Unrealized)

r/optionsSee Post

$2K to $50K in 90 Days - Options Trading Challenge (Day 1 +$250 Unrealized)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 23, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 22, 2024

r/stocksSee Post

How I am Positioning myself in the Markets going into 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of January 20, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 19, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 18, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Is billionaire Farhad Fred Ebrahimi going to make $DM explode ?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 17, 2024

r/investingSee Post

Corporate Account / Advice needed

r/investingSee Post

Mistake in MSCI World Mid Cap Equal Weighted fact sheet?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 16, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 15, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of January 13, 2024

r/WallStreetbetsELITESee Post

Thoughts on O3 Mining??

r/WallStreetbetsELITESee Post

Gold Plays People Are Looking at??

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 12, 2024

r/investingSee Post

Design app that encrypts phone calls

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 11, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 10, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 09, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 08, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of January 06, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 05, 2024

r/investingSee Post

C4: Explosive Potential Backed by Strategic Collaborations? Dive In!

r/investingSee Post

C4: Explosive Potential Backed by Strategic Collaborations? Dive In!

r/ShortsqueezeSee Post

C4: Explosive Potential Backed by Strategic Collaborations? Dive In!

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 04, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 03, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, January 02, 2024

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of December 30, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Idea for a random adventure

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 29, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 28, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 27, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 25, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of December 23, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 22, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 21, 2023

r/ShortsqueezeSee Post

Please use modmail, stop DMing us

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

10X ROI in 3 years - Investment Opportunity direct into Company Stock

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

I’m back, $6K weekly puts on W. Sticking to this account for now and transferring funds to RH this week. Scroll for charts and discussion.

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 20, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 19, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 18, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of December 16, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 15, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 14, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of December 09, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 08, 2023

r/pennystocksSee Post

What Gold Plays are People Looking at rn? $OIII.V?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 07, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 06, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 05, 2023

r/pennystocksSee Post

UX Workgroup

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 04, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Let’s go Elon Musk $TSLA $X, ladies and gentlemen let’s help him destroy $DIS Bob Iger, cancel their Disney subscription

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Been investing for 5 years. Started with 100k. DM me regarding my next class when you're ready to manifest your financial destiny.

r/pennystocksSee Post

Beware Datametrex AI Limited $DTMXF (otc) or DM (Canada)

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of December 02, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, December 01, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 30, 2023

r/optionsSee Post

Small group

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 29, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 28, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 27, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

The future of manufacturing is additive manufacturing.

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Is it time to buy 3D printing stocks while the hype has long but died out?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of November 25, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 24, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 23, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

1700% gain on my option and I’m still losing money.. I suck so bad at this.

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 22, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 21, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 20, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of November 18, 2023

r/StockMarketSee Post

I need some advice

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 17, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 16, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 15, 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 14, 2023

r/ShortsqueezeSee Post

SqueezeFinder Update - Nov 13th 2023

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What Are Your Moves Tomorrow, November 13, 2023

r/optionsSee Post

Rode $SPX 4405C from 2.2 to 11 with an AI powered data tool.

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Weekend Discussion Thread for the Weekend of November 11, 2023

r/optionsSee Post

Spy levels this week.

Mentions

I have a 300k bank roll and do futures options on commodities. I’m trying to start a discord but only have a few people so far. DM for link if interested.

Mentions:#DM

For a completely different trading style... income based strategies on SPX and SPY, longer-dated options (>45DTE)... we are a small trading community. Highly consistent, low risk approach that targets 50% annual return! No fast profits! DM me to share the link.

Mentions:#SPY#DM

DM'd the girl who pepper sprayed me asking if she's just playing "hard to get". She immediately changed her username to "user not found" which is a pretty bad name imo

Mentions:#DM

Sure, DM u/OPINION_IS_UNPOPULAR a butthole pic. Once he confirms receipt, you should see the deposit.

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

You can start here and learn before you piss away your money However, if you just wanna piss it away DM me and I’ll send you my Venmo https://www.cboe.com/optionsinstitute/

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Correctly predicted the last DM sneeze about 10m before it happened, starting to look sneezy again on the daily chart

Mentions:#DM

!!!!! CDK for the auto industry just got hacked. Massive losses expected. This system covers accounting, payroll, sales, etc. If you get a chance and are going to a dealership or auto shop today I'd greatly appreciate a DM or update with the status on this.

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Would anyone suggest a 0dte 130c/p straddle for NVDA tomorrow? If so what’s your thoughts? First time trying a straddle. Feel free to DM me if you prefer. Thanks

Mentions:#NVDA#DM

Thanks! I think I'll take a look at interactive. Another user below brought them up and DM'd me their referral code. However, technically you recommended them first . If you'd like to DM me your code, I'll use it. If not, I'll use theirs.

Mentions:#DM

I’m going to go ass to mouth with your girlfriend while you’re busy buying hand bags. Then I’m going to ignore her (private) DM’s for a “minimum wage bimbo”

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

https://preview.redd.it/yiugb0ca2r7d1.jpeg?width=960&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=ee986c59e1b3bb86ba7502587fc433df127442aa CHOICES - Dispo 2G Live Resin x Liquid Diamonds Dual Flavor Device (Restocked)✅ DM for prices

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

For sure. I’ll DM you now

Mentions:#DM

U/poof_poof_poof can you DM me your DD it disappeared

Mentions:#DM#DD

Put me on the DM list you stud

Mentions:#DM

👋 I’m the Public COO — happy to answer any questions about our HYCA or Public in general. We also offer Treasuries (both directly and via our Treasury account) in case those make sense for your cash. I can’t give specific advice but I will say I don’t think Discover’s COO hangs out on Reddit and is avail via DM…

Mentions:#COO#DM

May i get the same DM as well? Trying to learn as much as i can!

Mentions:#DM

Can I also get copy/paste of DM?

Mentions:#DM

I would love that DM as well. I’ve recently started making some money and want to start investing

Mentions:#DM

Deleted some comments I made responding to DMs here. Also, I may have been too friendly in DM. ![img](emote|t5_2th52|4260)

Mentions:#DM

Hey Scott, please send me the DM as well!

Mentions:#DM

Could you please DM me as well kind sir u/StonkScott ? Congrats btw!

Mentions:#DM

I want that DM as wellemote:t5\_2th52:4258

Mentions:#DM

bro put me on, im currently 100$--> 1600$ on base meme coins I need a new play DM me

Mentions:#DM

DM me too, good sir 🙏

Mentions:#DM

🤷🏼‍♂️ if ur serious DM me

Mentions:#DM

I would also like a DM

Mentions:#DM

Congrats once again! At this point can you just DM me your current trades? 🥸 Badly need a win

Mentions:#DM

Can you copy and paste that DM to me too?

Mentions:#DM

I want that DM too

Mentions:#DM

Gonna DM you instead

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

DM my old friend with a hulk dick

Mentions:#DM

lol DM is making its comeback

Mentions:#DM

Don’t DM me

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Sent you a DM

Mentions:#DM

Totally understand. You can just DM me any privileged financial and technological data that I can trade on, instead. Thanks! /s

Mentions:#DM

Shoot me a DM next time you’re placing a trade so I can inverse

Mentions:#DM

DM me why are you guys so dumb? The smart ppl DM me bc they got the message 😱🤯🤦🏻‍♂️ Holly shhhhh

Mentions:#DM

Careful. That's what killed DM Turner 

Mentions:#DM

Please DM me as well! Thanks!!!

Mentions:#DM

DM me too

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Daily reminder that the Yahoo comment sections makes more sense than Technical Analysis. DM'd "batwing" pics more valuable than batwing formations

Mentions:#DM

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL

Maybe not ask to go to DM but post your advice here?

Mentions:#DM

Somehow I dont trust this.... Please dont DM him...

Mentions:#DM

DM me if you would like to discuss this. I'm a financial planner and would love to study your case (for free) and give you my advice (for free)... I will tell you this. Asking what to do with your money on Reddit, is not a good start... You will get very good advice and a ton of Shit, and it will be very hard to tell one from the other... A (free) non-financial advice, move out of your parents' house, you're making enough money.

Mentions:#DM

DM me if you would like to discuss this. I'm a financial advisor and would love to study your case (for free) and offer my advice (for free).

Mentions:#DM

$ 1.000 may be the world to you now, but like many comments are saying, this was a cheap lesson after all. You started investing at 17, you'll be a millionaire in your 40s... Congrats! I'm starting my journey as a financial planner. Would love to work with you for FREE just to gain experience and give you the advice I would have loved to get at 20YO... I'm now 40 and learned about money the hard way... (do send me a DM)

Mentions:#FREE#DM

Damnnnnnnnnnnn bro. Mind sharing city? Nothing specific DM? ![img](emote|t5_2th52|4271)

Mentions:#DM

Well the point of investment is its high return yield. FQ are old and not on patent like the new med of discussion. They’re still widely prescribed and a great abx regardless. I’ve seen countless GI upset cases from these new glp 1 agonists as somewhat expected. Never an abnormal lipase. I suppose this is largely anecdotal but I think being able to prevent or minimize complications from DM, CAD, etc solely from obesity is worth the risk of a likely very rare complication. Time will tell but I suppose even if they get slapped with a black box warning this drug won’t slow down

Mentions:#DM

Hey. DM’d u a question about spdr rebalance/nvda

Mentions:#DM

I'm looking at DM. Probably more red days ahead in the short term, but one worth watching. I'm going in after they do dilution.

Mentions:#DM

DM the guy sometime.. So you’re saying you just happen to know OP and you’ve spoken to them at length, and just happened to come across this post. How coincidental. 100% OP on alt account.

Mentions:#DM

I don't think legalization is happening any time soon, but re-scheduling seems like it may. That would make these somewhat better businesses, but long-term weed just is not the business a lot of people think it is. It's a commodity product ultimately and branding doesn't change that. And I'm saying that as someone who is very pro weed. I have a couple of weed positions, but they are very, very minor and more for fun as someone who has an interest. Constellation Brands (STZ) has lost more on their Canopy investment than they did when they spent a billion dollars on Ballast Point and sold it for less than $100k. There's been two 3D printing bubbles in the last 8-9 years or so and both times it felt as if very little if any of the bubble was retained - "everyone out", basically. 3D printing is interesting in theory but at this point it has still definitely not taken off as something for the average person and it doesn't feel as if it has taken off in a broad sense for commercial use. DM looks neat, but The quantum computing stuff is early, but people have to really not put the potential interest in the theme ahead of, "is this a business that can even sustain itself, does it have good management, etc?" If something is early, it really takes someone skilled to navigate that path towards sustained growth. In an environment of higher rates, all of that becomes even more important. Elsewhere in the sector, there was a lengthy short report on IONQ in 2022. Also, not every theme that sounds interesting = worthwhile/good investment. This has been the issue with ARKK; it worked great during a bubble for any sort of "disruptive growth" name in 2020/21, it has done horribly since in an environment where profitable (or at the very least, shown path to profitable in a reasonable time frame) growth has done well, but low quality/unsustainable/unprofitable/very early and speculative growth themes have not. GTLB no idea, FSLY is maybe a decent asset that has been mismanaged, but NET has been/continues to be the better company. Maybe FSLY at some point is cheap enough to get interest from someone else who could run it better but I have no idea that that point isn't even lower in the stock from here.

Lot's of market participants are using it and other dating apps as they are not included (not yet anyway) with audits for insider trading and market manipulation. So with DM's you could get either decent stock pics or dick pics (Maybe both?). Still better odds than most of the crap posted on WSB.

Mentions:#DM

I needed that exact scenario when I was starting out too. I was confused about the whole exit strategy. I hope I’ve helped tonight. I’m happy to walk you through selling a contract you’ve bought. Feel free to DM me

Mentions:#DM

The reading list in the wiki and FAQ has a list of books ranging from light reading to advanced topics depending on your knowledge level. Link here - [Reading List](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/readinglist) Your post has been removed because it is a common beginner topic. We get too many of these topics every day and to prevent them from swamping the front page, we are removing main threads of this kind. We also remove such posts because they can attract spam and bad faith comments. If you receive DM's or un-solicitated offers, please be aware that there are a lot of financial scammers on social media. You are welcome to repost your question in the [daily discussion thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/about/sticky?num=1). If you have any issue with this removal, please contact the moderators via modmail. Thank you. ---- If you are new to investing, you can find curated resources in the r/investing wiki for [Getting Started here](https://www.reddit.com/r/investing/wiki/index/gettingstarted/). If you know nothing about the capital markets - the Getting Started section at the SEC educational site can be a good place to start - [investor.gov](https://investor.gov) \- there are also short 30 second videos on basics. The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) is a US regulator with a focus to protect US investors through regulatory oversight of the securities markets. The FINRA education site at [FINRA Education](https://www.finra.org/investors/learn-to-invest) also contains numerous free courses and educational materials. FINRA is a not-for-profit SRO (self regulatory organization) which is self-funded by it's members which are broker-dealers. It works under the supervision of the SEC with a mandate to protect the investing public against fraud and bad practice. For formal educational materials, several colleges and universities make their course work available for free. If want to learn about the financial markets - an older but reasonably relevant course is [Financial Markets (2011) - Yale University](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8FB14A2200B87185) This is the introduction to financial markets course taught by Prof. Shiller from Yale. Prof Shiller won the Nobel prize in economics in 2013. Another relavant course from MIT is a lecture series on Finance Theory taught by Prof Andrew Lo - [Financial Theory (2008) - MIT](https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63B2lDhyKOsImI7FjCf6eDW). A more current course can be found at NYU Stern School of Business by Prof Aswath Damodaran - [Corporate Finance Spring 2019](https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/webcastcfspr19.htm). Prof Damodaran offers the latest materials and webcast lectures to this class here - https://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/corpfin.html

Mentions:#DM#PL