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r/investingSee Post

What should I do with my ibonds?

r/investingSee Post

What to do next? I am running out of ideas

r/investingSee Post

What is the best way to invest 300k without significant risks?

r/investingSee Post

Looking to open a 2nd HYSA.

r/investingSee Post

Let's Say I Wanted to Try Timing the Market

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

What should I do with the money I have and what are the next steps in my financial journey?

r/stocksSee Post

What should I do with the money I have and what are the next steps in my financial journey?

r/stocksSee Post

Does anyone have reservations about selling their stocks?

r/investingSee Post

When do you guys move your money in your HYSA

r/investingSee Post

Experience with Private Alternative Funds and P2P?

r/investingSee Post

Wondering what to invest in besides VFIAX

r/investingSee Post

Ally vs Wealthfront high yield savings account?

r/investingSee Post

Assuming interest rates will come down in the 2024/2025 time frame

r/investingSee Post

How do I convince my wife that she is keeping too much in HYSA?

r/investingSee Post

HYSA Or REIT not sure which one is the better option. Please see description below.

r/investingSee Post

Young Investor Looking for Advice

r/investingSee Post

Help a Slav to start investing ^_^

r/investingSee Post

2 Part Question about $450k commission

r/investingSee Post

I have an infant and two year old and want to take the family on some sort of awesome vacation when they are old enough to appreciate it, say 7 and 9. Would creating a brokerage account for a specific ~6 year goal make sense?

r/investingSee Post

Tax & Travel Savings & Brokerage Accounts

r/investingSee Post

What to do with $300,000 just sitting in my checking account?

r/investingSee Post

I feel like I’m leaving so much money on the table. Talk some sense into me.

r/investingSee Post

How to figure out break even point for tbills vs cds?

r/investingSee Post

Taxable account fund options

r/investingSee Post

HYSA Who to go with highest %

r/investingSee Post

Advice for Newborns/Future

r/investingSee Post

Choosing between a CD or HYSA to allocate 15% of investments..

r/investingSee Post

Totaled Engine, Pay off Car Loan?

r/investingSee Post

Thoughts on 31yo investment portfolio - big pay raise next year and questions

r/investingSee Post

Is it worth holding money or paying off an auto loan?

r/investingSee Post

Short term investment/ saving options to financially support parents

r/investingSee Post

Thoughts on fixed maturity bond ETFs?

r/investingSee Post

HYSA or Fidelity managed portfolio

r/investingSee Post

Does anybody invest in mutual funds anymore?

r/investingSee Post

Maxed Roth IRA 2024.... invest or save money held for 2025 Roth IRA?

r/investingSee Post

What "asset class" has the lowest IQ investors?

r/investingSee Post

23 and 170k cash, What would you do?

r/investingSee Post

Anyone use Tellus or something similar

r/investingSee Post

Where to invest 10k leveraged from CC cash advance (5% fee)?

r/investingSee Post

5.41% VUSXX vs HYSA or something else?

r/investingSee Post

Can you pull physical cash from HYSA?

r/investingSee Post

High yield savings account defaults

r/investingSee Post

400K investing advice with keeping it safe as only condition

r/investingSee Post

Best no-penalty CDs for emergency fund?

r/investingSee Post

Any HYSAs that are still offering 4.5-5.5% APY other than Marcus?

r/investingSee Post

Rebalancing Portfolio Suggestions

r/investingSee Post

I have 60K sitting in my bank account and my salary is 60K. HYSA vs ETF vs ??

r/investingSee Post

Where to Rollover 401K - Roth IRA or HYSA

r/investingSee Post

Investing Question for a 33 year old

r/investingSee Post

Reinvesting $30k in HYSA - are T-Bills my best option?

r/investingSee Post

Reinvesting $30k from HYSA - are T-Bills the best low-risk option?

r/investingSee Post

Should I cash out annuity and invest it?

r/investingSee Post

Nontraditional investments for $100k in cash?

r/investingSee Post

Looking into CDs, but I need an explanation on if I am understanding this correctly

r/investingSee Post

I have an additional $1200 every month

r/investingSee Post

Can a non-guardian set up a savings/brokerage/HYSA account for minor?

r/investingSee Post

Possible opportunity of a lifetime that I'd like an opinion on.

r/investingSee Post

What should I do with $7000

r/investingSee Post

42M - Seeking Insight on My Investment Strategy

r/investingSee Post

British expat living in the US. Thoughts on my investing and saving strategy

r/investingSee Post

What makes most sense for me (HYSA vs. S&P)?

r/investingSee Post

Is my retirement outlook reasonable or is this out of sight?

r/investingSee Post

Starting first "real" job after graduation soon and plan on maxing my Roth IRA Contributions and enough to get my employer's 401k match yearly. I'm looking at possibly buying a house around next spring and am contemplating whether to do something safer like a HYSA or throw it in index funds/etfs.

r/investingSee Post

Money market funds for Down payment?

r/investingSee Post

I am afraid to stop contributing towards my investments to build 6 month emergency fund because of my portfolio manager

r/investingSee Post

British expat in the UK, want to run my logic past some 3rd party people

r/investingSee Post

Where should invest $125,000 as a 25 year old in 2024?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Back in 12/31/1999, I was short YHOO.......then this happened

r/stocksSee Post

Back in 12/31/1999, I was short YHOO.......then this happened

r/investingSee Post

Where to park money for a down payment for about 1-1.5 years?

r/investingSee Post

Which account to save money for a house?

r/investingSee Post

SPAXX (MMF) vs Marcus by Goldman Sachs (HYSA) Which one should I use?

r/investingSee Post

Best HYSA to choose? Also general advice?

r/investingSee Post

Investing When Young is Always Suggested, But How Do We Know Market Will Be Strong in The Future?

r/investingSee Post

20 year old figuring out what to do with my Roth IRA

r/investingSee Post

Investing for a house in retirement

r/investingSee Post

Christmas money given to me

r/investingSee Post

What would be the best path forward?

r/RobinHoodSee Post

Dump in large amount or slowly add into holdings?

r/investingSee Post

Investment Advice: ESPP and Portfolio

r/StockMarketSee Post

Is it dumb it expect a crash?

r/investingSee Post

What are your views on moving out of cash investments and into bonds, etc. at this point in time?

r/investingSee Post

Investing advice for moving around 100k into ETFs

r/stocksSee Post

Schwab vs E-Trade vs SoFi vs Robinhood for Trading Stock

r/investingSee Post

Learning More about ROTH IRA Options- Vanguard

r/investingSee Post

Government Money Market Fund vs HYSA?

r/investingSee Post

HYSA or taxable brokerage account?

r/investingSee Post

Potential SGOV HYSA arbitrage?

r/investingSee Post

Need Investing advice, being an Immigrant in US

r/investingSee Post

Is maxing out my Roth IRA towards the end of this year worth it?

r/investingSee Post

Optimal Investment for Downpayment

r/investingSee Post

One Year Rolling “Escrow” Investment Strategy Feedback

r/investingSee Post

Asset Protection in Florida

r/investingSee Post

Max out 401k, pay off debts or keep in HYSA for down payment on a house?

r/investingSee Post

How to DCA a large sum of cash? How long is too long to space it out?

r/stocksSee Post

If you were gifted $50,000, how would you divide it up between S&P500 and HYSA?

r/investingSee Post

If you were gifted $50,000, how would you divide it up between S&P500 and HYSA?

r/StockMarketSee Post

"Entry" point for ETFs

r/investingSee Post

SGOV a good place to hold cash for liquidity?

r/investingSee Post

[Europe] Investing in XEON & VWCE. Need advice

Mentions

SPAXX is more of a HYSA alternative. Same concept in my opinion as a HYSA just not with a traditional bank and instead with a brokerage like Fidelity which also offers various financial services

Mentions:#SPAXX#HYSA

JEPI is 10000% NOT a HYSA alternative.

Mentions:#JEPI#HYSA

You can definitely use it as a HYSA alternative. Currently I'm pretty sure it's at around 5% so pretty damn great. If you want to not invest your savings but just let them grow, just put your money into fidelity and it'll automatically invest them into SPAXX. If you want to invest in the stock market that's something completely different. Good luck!

Mentions:#HYSA#SPAXX

Don't put your emergency fund in the stock market. Move it to a higher HYSA or a money market fund. If you want cash equivalents, then there are T-Bills, CDs, I-Bonds, etc. where you won't risk losing money.

Mentions:#HYSA

Other options are ETFs like SGOV that are comprised of these treasuries. Right now that fund is at 5.25% yield with the risk of a HYSA. The yield lost to the ETF to me is worth not having to manage the t-bills myself.

Mentions:#SGOV#HYSA

So maybe 200k global diversified, 100k money market or HYSA?

Mentions:#HYSA

There is still risk, just less. The risk also goes down with longer amounts of time, but by nature any equity will have some form of risk. Only risk free really is like HYSA/CD's/Bonds/Treasuries.

Mentions:#HYSA

Depends when you need access to the money again If you’re young and don’t need it for say 5 years+ go into a low cost equity index fund. If you want to use it next year as a down payment on a home go HYSA Etc

Mentions:#HYSA

If you specifically need the money in 6 months, HYSA. If that is just an arbitrary timeline, S&P. You already have a HYSA and no exposure to S&P.

Mentions:#HYSA

Is putting aside capital gains tax to a HYSA based on your income level not a thing?

Mentions:#HYSA

JEPI is not a HYSA equivalent but I am retired and have some JEPI and SCHD as a lower volatility stock alternative with income like bonds. JEPI is reasonably new so no long term history.

Nice! Yeah, I get your hesitation to pull from the emergency fund then. In that case, you can’t go wrong with shoving the 15k into at a HYSA. You’ll at least be earning interest that beats the current inflation rate! Also, you might wanna do some more research into different HYSA, as 4.25% APY isn’t bad, but there are higher rates out there!

Mentions:#HYSA

It's all about your own risk, but what you are doing is probably a 10/10 in terms of risk. Investing in anything with a time line within a year is pretty risky, especially when you get a solid rate in a HYSA/Money Market fund to keep the money liquid or just going with the a CD.

Mentions:#HYSA

When you rotate out of HYSA into the market, the buying makes the price go up. Then when the rotation stops, the prices level, people call the top and rotate out. As long as there's money sitting in 5% savings accounts, we're not at the top.

Mentions:#HYSA

Investing advice for young adult Hi all, I'm a 28 year old and I'm currently sitting with 10k in a HYSA, 50k in a Roth 401k and wondering where I should start to diversify/explore next. Partner and I are looking at buying a house in the next year or 2 and I'm still planning to contribute ~500/ month into stock market on top of my Roth 401k contributions. Do you recommend just slowly buying stocks for successful companies and relying on their returns over time? I feel like I'm pretty fiscally responsible (or at least try to be) and want to increase my net worth. Appreciate any advice!

Mentions:#HYSA

One year's worth of expense in HYSA. Kept the rest invested in ETF.

Mentions:#HYSA

Exactly if you are still saving to buy a house, this money needs to be in safer places like HYSA or money market.

Mentions:#HYSA

What’s wrong with selling his portfolio for a home? It’s separate from retirement account anyway lol. You don’t make sense at all. Would it have been better if he let the money sit in a HYSA? No

Mentions:#HYSA

Most would consider that too conservative for your age, but only you know your risk tolerance. Personally I would keep 6mo avg expenses in HYSA and invest the rest. But considering your age you’re way ahead of the curve anyway

Mentions:#HYSA

A HYSA or money market account are reasonable places for this emergency fund money.

Mentions:#HYSA

> Cash is loosing its buying power. You picked a bad HYSA

Mentions:#HYSA

1. Semi conservative. While I know I won't get rich quickly I'd rather be sure not to take massive losses at the worst time... 2. Yes, of course. My mid term investements are in a classic 60/40 portfolio and is planned for a 5-10 year period. A downpayment for a future house...hopefully. Also got a buffer in my Hysa and last but not least the aggressive retirement portfolio with 100% stocks for 15+ years holding time. 3. Generally I don't. While I've never had a loss from my stock picking and seen returns between 30-300% (holding time 1-6 months) I only use a maximum of 5% of my portfolio for stock picking. I, like Warren Buffet, only invest when I'm sure I see a good deal...never invest in trends or hype stocks seen in media. My mainstream investments are all *whole market index funds*. 4. Yolo money all goes into one stock at a time. Once sold I can do another Yolo. The other goes into the index at 60/40 stock/bonds. 5. Statistically a 60/40 portfolio should be a optimal mix of return with comparably low volatility over my chosen time period. As for long term only 100% stocks makes sense. 6. Yes, monthly rebalancing for my 60/40 portfolio depending on market movements. As I add money to the market I'll add to it if it's down until it gets to my chosen target. If it is at target level or above I'll rebalance and throw the profits into my retirement account instead (not American, so no Roth/401k). 7. As for house downpayment it is 5+ years away and once me/the missus start thinking about it seriously I'll increase the bonds to lower volatility further. As we get serious about looking at houses I'll move the funds to a HYSA. As for the retirement account it'll be...many decades away.

Mentions:#HYSA

Small but it ultimately depends on a lot of factors. There are a lot of risk averse people who are simply never satisfied with any amount of risk and yet they still want to invest. You can't have it all. Maybe put them in a HYSA or CD. If you invest in the stock market, there will be down days. But if you have the privilege of time, i.e. don't immediately need that money and can let it sit, based on the average performance of the market with the first 2-3 years in you've basically shielded yourself from a downturn. There are no guarantees, and you could be unlucky and invest shortly before a crash, but ultimately if you don't take it out, it will recover. The real question you should be asking yourself is what are you doing about the money you're losing right now? You're too afraid to invest in the market because your money might go down 10% but your money will go down 10% in 7-9 years in the bank anyways due to inflation, and that is assuming the rate stays the same in those 7-9 years. By contrast the last big recessions didn't last half that. So yeah investing at the top of the market right before a recession happens sucks but the probabilities are low, and if you invest and a crash doesn't happen in a few years your money has appreciated to the degree that if nothing else even if a recession happens you might lose the gains but not the principal amount.

Mentions:#HYSA

>Discussion point: in a long term bear market (dot com crash, COVID, etc.) especially in a Roth IRA, why wouldn’t you sell equities and put it all into a money market fund, HYSA, CDs, or bonds? Because a downturn is not schedule its not like someone pust it on the calendar that says "next month is the start of a bear market" If you sell into a bear market you are selling low the market will most likely have already crashed before you realize its a "bear market" Then you have to time your reentry . When you you re enter, when the market recovers, you would be selling low and buying high what is exactly what tends to happen when people do this

Mentions:#HYSA

I use chase wealth management - I can’t say you’ll get that high of a return but what I have found most appealing is for someone like me - that isn’t super smart trading stocks or trying to make the big payday - they have a wealth of services and are really into helping you understand and laying out a plan for retirement. I rolled my 401k from an old job over, opened a ROTH and also started a SEP - in addition I have a HYSA and can also buy stocks ( I use fidelity for that as they allow partial buys ). On top of that I meet (zoom or phone) with them once a year to see how things are progressing and can email any time to set up a call if I have questions or want to move money around. I’ve talked to my person 3 times this year already to sort the year, make a deposit into my SEP and to transfer another old IRA that I recently found out about. I have a call scheduled to chat mid July to chat about changing strategies for my ROTH. A lot of unnecessary explanation to say - I love it ;) Plus - it is all in the one app.

Mentions:#HYSA

Discussion point: in a long term bear market (dot com crash, COVID, etc.) especially in a Roth IRA, why wouldn’t you sell equities and put it all into a money market fund, HYSA, CDs, or bonds? I understand the thought process of nobody knows when it will go back up, you can’t time the market, time in the market beats timing the market, and the like, but in semi long term instances like these, people probably have a general idea. I just feel like it’s a better use of your money to not only protect it but also gain ~5ish percent annually while you’re at it instead of losing ~80ish percent of your portfolio Am I missing something, do the rates on these fixed incomes go lower as well? I am still a somewhat new investor at 23 years old so thought this would be a helpful conversation in the event something drastic happens to the market. Thanks!

Mentions:#HYSA

Say you buy $100 of stuff. If you use a cash back card, you get $3 back that you can use to invest in the market or a Treasury bond that yields around 5%. Say you get that as $3 worth of "points" or "miles." Until you use the points, it's a zero interest loan to the issuing bank. Then when you use the points, you're limited to the ways the issuer wants you to use them. You can use them for flights, hotel rooms, spending, etc. But there's typically higher prices when you buy with "points" rather than with cash. Lastly, the issuer can dilute your points whenever they want. At least when the Fed prints money, JPow's not making a profit off of the resulting inflation. But when the CEO of a rewards program does it, they do. So say 3% cash back gets you $3. But say it gets you 3 points and a point is equal to a dollar. The issuer can just make 2 points equal to a dollar, which dilutes your points. They can do this sneakily too by keeping the point to dollar value the same, but also increasing the prices/points needed to redeem them for a flight or hotel room. They often even give you more points, but each point is worth less when converted to dollars. If you know anything about finance, (which I know you do), you can make a ton more money simply getting cash back and leaving it in your HYSA. People treat points as "free money" that they can only spend on fun travel and luxury products. But that's a mirage. You're basically investing in the world's worst asset. And Robinhood offers 3% cash back, which is insane. The highest I saw before was 2%. I don't think any cheap or expensive card comes close. Plus, the money ends up in an HYSA that pays 5%. You don't need to pay attention to it like with other banks/cards. Personally, this is my favorite business model. It's Warren Buffet's favorite business model too. He rode these principles up to become the wealthiest person in the world. Here's a video about it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggUduBmvQ_4&t=3s

Mentions:#HYSA

I have 6 months expenses set aside already in a HYSA plus 20% pretax income into retirement. This is just additional savings.

Mentions:#HYSA

I would personally choose an online HYSA if it were me. The liquidity you're after is built in and you'll likely find an easy 4.25% interest rate (approximately).

Mentions:#HYSA

You mentioned an 'unlikely' personal emergency, but if this down payment money is also your emergency fund, then I'd leave enough in t-bills or a HYSA to cover 3-6 months of expenses no matter what. Whether to invest in index funds after setting aside your emergency fund depends on how flexible you are as to when you need the money. If you can wait out a market downturn, then a 6-10 year period is long enough to make the risk worthwhile in my opinion.

Mentions:#HYSA

As you’re starting out, I’d open up a HYSA and build up your emergency fund first. After you build up a comfortable emergency fund, then focus on 401k, HSA, Roth, etc.

Mentions:#HYSA

The people who are holding CDs, bonds and HYSA have not made any money in this Bull Market. Inflation has eaten away most of their gains.

Mentions:#HYSA

5% HYSA all day

Mentions:#HYSA

A lot of money is sitting on the sidelines generating interest which will have to go somewhere once those rates come down. *”With borrowing costs now likely close to their peaks and set to possibly fall, “this will reduce the attractiveness of holding cash and likely see reallocations to the return-generating potential of carefully selected risk assets,”* https://www.marketwatch.com/amp/story/almost-6-trillion-cash-pile-in-money-markets-may-need-to-start-being-redeployed-soon-janus-henderson-says-30fc2f82 The people still sitting in cash are going to stand by and watch markets continue to push to new ATHs until rates start getting cut. Tell me.. what’s more attractive, SPY going up 26% last year, or 4.5% return on the cash you had locked up in a HYSA?

Mentions:#SPY#HYSA

Hello, I have a bit of a multifaceted question I am hoping to get some insight on, regarding 401k and index fund investments. I am 31 years old making a little over $60k annually in the US. I am completely new to investing and have been saving up while still living at home. I now have $80k that was just sitting in my checking account I am finally deciding to do something with. So far, I opened a HYSA and put $30k into that. It will serve as an emergency fund/accessible savings for an eventual house or apartment. I opened up an account with Fidelity yesterday, and the other $50k I am looking to invest in index funds for long term savings; at least 20+ years, likely retirement but not necessarily restricted to that. As of now, the way I am thinking of allocating this amount is to put 70% into a total US market fund, 20% into a total international market fund, and 10% into a US bond. Here's where my confusion starts: I have a 401k through my employer I set up a few years ago. I knew nothing about how it worked at the time (and just now am starting to really learn about all this stuff), and decided to contribute 5% traditional that is matched by my employer, and 5% Roth contributions. These are still my current contributions. While getting my feet wet with all my index fund learning, I remembered my 401k offers different investment plans such as Fidelity 500 index fund and Fidelity Inflation-protected bond index fund. Both of which I was planning to invest my $50k in through Fidelity. Now for my onslaught of questions as I try to keep this concise as possible: 1. How do index fund investment plans work with 401k and should I prioritize those first? Does a designated percent come out of my paycheck over time and get put into the fund, and can I also invest a designated amount I have saved up from this $50k to this 401k index fund plan? If so, should it be a traditional or Roth contribution? 2. If I go ahead and prioritize the 401k index fund plans, is it also fine to go ahead and continue investing this $50k into Fidelity index funds (or at least a portion of this money)? Would it be redundant to invest into the options I allocated in paragraph 2 through Fidelity if I chose to invest in a similar US market fund and the same bond through my 401k? 3. Should I only do regular 401k contributions up to the percent my employer matches, and the rest put into investment plans? How do I decide on whether to make these contributions traditional or Roth? Currently they match 5%, so I contribute 5% traditional to match that. Is it pointless to be contributing another 5% as Roth without it being a part of an investment plan? 4. I'm not going to list all the plan options, but are there any specific 401k investment plans typically offered by employers I should be on the lookout for to take advantage of besides these Fidelity index funds? I know this is a lot to answer so I appreciate any insight or partial help I can get. Thanks!

Mentions:#HYSA

Hello, I have a bit of a multifaceted question I am hoping to get some insight on, regarding 401k and index fund investments. I am 31 years old making a little over $60k annually in the US. I am completely new to investing and have been saving up while still living at home. I now have $80k that was just sitting in my checking account I am finally deciding to do something with. So far, I opened a HYSA and put $30k into that. It will serve as an emergency fund/accessible savings for an eventual house or apartment. I opened up an account with Fidelity yesterday, and the other $50k I am looking to invest in index funds for long term savings; at least 20+ years, likely retirement but not necessarily. As of now, the way I am thinking of allocating this amount is to put 70% into a total US market fund, 20% into a total international market fund, and 10% into a US bond. Here's where my confusion starts: I have a 401k through my employer I set up a few years ago. I knew nothing about how it worked at the time (and just now am starting to really learn about all this stuff), and decided to contribute 5% traditional that is matched by my employer, and 5% Roth contributions. These are still my current contributions. While getting my feet wet with all my index fund learning, I remembered my 401k offers different investment plans such as Fidelity 500 index fund and Fidelity Inflation-protected bond index fund. Both of which I was planning to invest my $50k in through Fidelity. Now for my onslaught of questions as I try to keep this concise as possible: 1. How do index fund investment plans work with 401k and should I prioritize those first? Does a designated percent come out of my paycheck over time, and can I also invest a designated amount of money I have saved up to this 401k index fund plan? If so, should it be a traditional or Roth contribution? 2. If I go ahead and prioritize the 401k index fund plans, is it also fine to go ahead and continue investing this $50k into Fidelity index funds (or at least a portion of this money)? Would it be redundant to invest into the options I allocated in paragraph 2 through Fidelity if I chose to invest in a similar US market fund and the same bond through 401k? 3. Should I only do regular 401k contributions up to the percent my employer matches, and the rest put into investment plans? How do I decide on whether to make these contributions traditional or Roth? Currently they match 5%, so I contribute 5% traditional to match that. Is it pointless to be contributing another 5% as Roth without it being a part of an investment plan? 4. I'm not going to list all the plan options, but are there any specific 401k investment plans typically offered by employers I should be on the lookout for to take advantage of besides these Fidelity index funds? I know this is a lot to answer so I appreciate any insight or partial help I can get. Thanks!

Mentions:#HYSA

Is there anything wrong with using some of these banking apps that have investing? I've signed up for SoFi so I can take advantage of their HYSA. I set up a direct deposit so I get the 4.6 apy for the savings. Only a 15% percentage of my DD goes to SoFi right now and the other half is with my traditional bank. I've started taking some of that money to also put in some ETFs they offer. Currently SPLG, since I can own full shares currently (just looks better to the eye). I've looked into Fidelity etc but never took the plunge as I hate having my money spread across a lot of platforms. Should I just focus on something more reputable like Fidelity? And use SoFi strictly for the savings account? I don't meddle with the day trading, single stocks I could with SoFi.

Mentions:#HYSA#DD#SPLG

Should have been clearer with the $200k: Just taking half of that to invest into taxable and the other half will remain in HYSA as an emergency fund. As for financial situation: believe my wife and I are in a good spot. We’re currently renting and paying monthly rent for a condo from her mom, and do think ultimately it’ll be inherited by her down the line. We’re pretty much savers and investors, and don’t splurge on ourselves too much (Just by choice). So, even 10 years from now with how our lifestyle is and continuing to save and invest, we’d still be good within our financial situation.

Mentions:#HYSA

Throw it in a HYSA and live a modest 80K/year live for free. ![img](emote|t5_2th52|8883)

Mentions:#HYSA

Depends on where you're at in your investing journey. I'd sell them for a cheaper bond fund if CG tax wouldn't be high. Look up where your bond allocation should be based on your age. As you near retirement you should get more bonds. Get a HYSA for closer to 4.6-5% interest.

Mentions:#CG#HYSA

I honestly haven't studied MMFs much, but essentially, the HYSA doesn't time out. It's simply a savings account which pays a higher interest rate.

Mentions:#HYSA

What is the benefit of an online HYSA versus buying a MMF in a brokerage account? I've seen people suggest HYSA but in most cases they appear to be no better, and often offer lower returns, than simply buying a MMF in my brokerage account.

Mentions:#HYSA

Definitely pay off the debt that has higher than the HYSA yield. Then HYSA can be good. Did you mean monthly expenses instead of daily? If you're investing for 10+ years, consider ETFs for at least a portion of the money. Tax advantaged accounts for 40+ years. Definitely have a 6 month emergency fund in a HYSA, and money you want for stuff in the next 10 years. If debt weighs on you emotionally, put way more towards it. For some people the right answer could be fully pay off the debt.

Mentions:#HYSA

Replace Fidelity with Schwab, and add in and Ally HYSA, and you have just described my investing spread.

Mentions:#HYSA

Hi, I have about 130K sitting in my checking account and I am planning on putting them toward HYSA or CDs to earn interest while it is high (HYSA is 4.6% for Sofi and CD is 5% for Marcus and Capital One, both seems legit but plz let me know if you think otherwise). But I am debating whether I should payoff my car and student loan first before putting the rest into HYSA and CD. Below are details of my debt: Monthly salary: About 5800 Daily Expenses: 1500 planned Emergency Fund: will starting funding it, placing it under HYSA **Car Loan:** Current Balance 8926.66 Original Amount 16470.5 Interest rate 3.99 Term of Loan 72 Payment: 258.03 **Student Loans: (first number is current balance, second one is interest and last one is original principal owed)** Direct Loan 1 $2,983.25 3.510% $3,500.00 Direct Loan 2 $4,204.14 4.200% $4,500.00 Direct Loan 3 $2,059.25 4.200% $2,000.00 Direct Loan 4 $5,145.02 4.800% $5,500.00 Direct Loan 5 $1,005.40 4.800% $1,000.00 Monthly Payment: 318.33 Total: 15,397.06 **Perkins Loan:** Payoff: $2,149.94 Due $181.61 Debt Amount 2000 interest 5% Payoff all: 8926.66 + 15,397.06 + 2,149.94 = 26473.66 I guess my main concern it, should I put the 26K in paying off all my loans or put it into the HYSA or CD to earn interest while continuing the monthly payment, in hope that the eventual earning from the HYSA or CD interest will net more than what I pay on loan interest?

Mentions:#HYSA

You should think about what you want each dollar to do before you allocate it. Choose the smartest place for that dollar to go, depending on what you want it for. If you want the money for retirement, 401k is more tax advantaged. If you want the money sooner but still in 10+ years, a brokerage account is the move. Less than that, HYSA. You wouldn't want to put your emergency fund money in a 401k, even if that's the "best return on your money", that's just not where the money should go. Houses are expensive. Rent is the max you pay and a house is the minimum. You have to run a few calculations when considering whether or not to buy a house, and if renting and investing is cheaper than a house loan with interest, depreciation, and repair costs. A house may also end you with more money in the long run, just gotta run the calculation. Find out all of the conditions for being able to withdraw from certain accounts, Roth IRA can have some money used for a first home or other qualified expenses like tuition. Some similar stuff with 401k, look into your accounts terms. You should budget a certain amount for retirement such that you'll have a big enough nest egg to safely assume a certain income from making investment withdraws. Run an investment calculator with 7% return to find out how much you'll start retirement with. Take the income you want when retired, divide it by .04 and that's typically a good number to shoot for.

Mentions:#HYSA

Personal finance is personal; there's no "one-size-fits-all" solution. There absolutely is a "mathematically optimal" solution, but I doubt anyone actually gets that extreme. Just as an example, I refinanced at basically the best time and got a mortgage rate close to 2%. Every month, I pay additional principal to round it up to the nearest $100 (usually around $75 extra). Mathematically, I shouldn't pay a penny more than I have to, but I keep doing it anyways. As far as putting money in a brokerage account for liquidity, my take is that any significant amount of necessary liquid funds should be either in an emergency fund, or earmarked for a specific savings goal. In both cases, I want the money to be there when I need it, and I'm okay losing out on some potential earnings for the added security. Of course, the particular vehicle used depends on the timeline of the goal and the risk appetite of the person, but for me, most of it ends up in a HYSA. For any money that doesn't have a specific purpose, I personally want it working as hard as possible to make me more money. Taxes tend to take a big chunk out of the earnings (particularly when compounded over a number of years), so if I can avoid them, I absolutely will. Perhaps another thing worth noting - I max out a backdoor Roth IRA every year, so there is a "peace of mind" factor that I can access all of the contributions/conversions from 5+ years ago penalty free if I really need to. I absolutely don't intend to, but it's nice to know it's an option.

Mentions:#HYSA

How long have you had the job? You should just max out your retirement contributions if your employer does matching. Next, find out the average monthly rent for a 1br apartment in your area, multiply it by 10 and just stuff all your extra money in a HY Savings Acct until you reach that number. THEN open a personal brokerage account and start throwing money into S&P index funds. Keep throwing at least $1k/mo in that HYSA too. Don't forget to set a couple hundred extra aside for yourself each month for fun!

Mentions:#HY#HYSA

Old info HYSA pay 5%+ now

Mentions:#HYSA

Whatever you do, build an emergency fund first. Throw that in a HYSA. Once you have that done you can move onto investing. Also idk about Australian but if they have anything like a Roth IRA I would look into that and start contributing.

Mentions:#HYSA

Sounds corny, but contacting a financial advisor is obviously your best bet. But I ran into this as well and this is what I learned: Comparing the dividend yield of VOO (Vanguard S&P 500 ETF) to the interest rates of a High-Yield Savings Account (HYSA) or Treasury fund can be insightful, but it's important to understand the differences between these investment options: 1. **Dividend Yield vs. Interest Rate**: * **Dividend Yield (VOO)**: VOO currently has a dividend yield of around 1.2% (as of my last update). Dividend yield represents the annual dividend income per share divided by the current share price. This yield can fluctuate based on the dividends declared by the companies in the S&P 500 index, which VOO tracks. * **Interest Rate (HYSA/Treasury Fund)**: HYSA interest rates and Treasury fund yields are typically expressed as annual percentage yields (APY). As of recent times, HYSA rates have been in the range of 0.5% to 2% APY, while Treasury funds like TTTXX might offer yields slightly higher, depending on the duration and type of Treasury securities held. 2. **Risk and Return**: * **VOO**: Investing in VOO involves owning shares of a diversified portfolio of large-cap U.S. companies. While dividends provide income, the value of your investment can fluctuate with market movements. VOO historically offers the potential for higher returns over the long term compared to cash equivalents like HYSA or Treasury funds, but it also carries market risk. * **HYSA/Treasury Funds**: These options offer lower returns but are generally considered safer because they involve lower risk of principal loss. They are backed by FDIC insurance (for HYSA) or the full faith and credit of the U.S. government (for Treasury securities). 3. **Comparison Considerations**: * **Income Generation**: VOO's dividend yield can provide additional income beyond capital appreciation, potentially outperforming cash equivalents like HYSA or short-term Treasury funds over time. * **Volatility**: VOO's price can be volatile, and dividends are not guaranteed. In contrast, HYSA and Treasury funds provide stability in value but with lower returns. 4. **Investment Objectives**: * If your goal is to preserve capital with minimal risk and immediate liquidity needs, HYSA or Treasury funds might be more suitable. * If you have a longer investment horizon and can tolerate market fluctuations, VOO could offer higher potential returns through a combination of capital appreciation and dividends.

Congrats! AVGO has been brewing for a while. It was only a matter of time.. you caught it perfectly! Now … go move those gains out of your trading account immediately! Make your quarterly tax payment of 40% before 6/30. You don’t want to get hit with IRS late penalties for not paying your quarterly taxes. Then put the rest of your gains in an easy breezy 5% HYSA or perhaps split some into long term boring investments like JEPI or JEPQ, etc

So you are saying a CD, which is locked for however long the term is, and you are unable to get your money out before the term ends, unless you want to pay penalty fees, is the same as a HYSA that I have full access to my funds and no fee i.e.: my emergency fund that is available to me whenever, are the same thing, pal? There’s been a lot of good comments and advice but your comment deserves a “dipshit of the week” medal. I have two different accounts. A HYSA AND a CD.

Mentions:#HYSA

Is this your entire portfolio and how much longer do you plan to work? If you sold everything and HYSA everything you’d probably pull in 90k cash a year to live off of. I’d probably sell. Not sure how much more money you need than 2.5 mil. You won the game of life, no need to push on.

Mentions:#HYSA

Because your child's timeframe for these investments is so long it definitely doesn't make sense to a HYSA, over the next 16 years or so the market will almost certainly outperform a MMF/HYSA, those would be good options if you had to use the funds within the next 2 years or so

Mentions:#HYSA

Appreciate the input! Was planning to originally do a 529 for him. Just was curious if it made any sense to do a HYSA or anything else. Thank you!

Mentions:#HYSA

An HYSA is not an investment.

Mentions:#HYSA

Get a HYSA or stop being stupid.

Mentions:#HYSA

If you are looking to save for long term needs, which includes a 15 year time horizon for college and certainly beyond that, then you don't want anything to do with cash accounts (HYSA, MMF). 529 is for education but can be rolled into a Roth IRA with certain restrictions. A standard brokerage account registered to the parent and gifted at your discretion, or a custodial brokerage account managed by the parent with the child as the beneficiary - legally transferred at age 21 (in most states) - are the other options. Either way, you want to be investing in stock index funds with this kind of time period. Stay away from cash.

Mentions:#HYSA

What investment is better than a HYSA right now? Just a personal investment account with everything in something like FOCPX?

Mentions:#HYSA#FOCPX

I typically invest 75% of my take home. 25% get put into a HYSA

Mentions:#HYSA

Especially when money is earning 5%. You could just put it in an HYSA or buy SGOV in your brokerage. Honestly, it just feels better knowing I’m ok financially and I can invest without feeling so on edge now. Definitely get some money buffer.

Mentions:#HYSA#SGOV

Until you break about $500K and actually need to manage (maximize) because of tax purposes, it really doesn’t matter. You just want at least 50% in an ETF for long term and tax advantages. 20-30% should be companies you trust to stand the test of time (and pay dividends ideally). The rest can be cash, or your FU money. The tax threshold is if you don’t maximize, you pay taxes. If you do, you brush up against AMT. Your time horizon also matters, but I don’t get the feeling you’re going to retire in the next 5-20 yrs. Maximize your earnings, minimize your liabilities (eg income and sales tax where you don’t get a great SALT deduction) After a decent $800K, a HYSA yielding about 4-5% means additional income which may be taxed. Hence, below $400K really isn’t going to put you at risk for anything (including audits)

Mentions:#AMT#HYSA

I've got an alternative opinion, don't invest at all currently. Stick it in a HYSA until you've got a good house deposit saved up.

Mentions:#HYSA

Long term growth. Some people are putting money in HYSA or CD because they like the interest. They jump on the band wagon, but forget about the 10 years you received nothing. VOO is supposed to be the best return. Warren Buffet's money goes to VOO when he dies. Yes, there are some dividend stocks such as SCHD, that have done well. ETF's like VOO are tax efficient (brokerage account). I tried dividend stocks and my tax bill was atrocious. Bonds are important. New crowds want to avoid them. Long term it is best to play it safe.

the MMFs themselves aren't insured by anything and although they're one of the safest investments, nowhere near a HYSA that's FDIC-insured, Money market funds can depreciate, primarily from "fund runs", but it's incredibly rare to see that ever happen https://corporate.vanguard.com/content/corporatesite/us/en/corp/articles/tried-true-money-markets-get-boost.html#:\~:text=How%20much%20should%20a%20money,of%20large%20losses%20in%20derivatives.

Mentions:#HYSA

I’d make more money from my HYSA than buying and selling bonds dude get real

Mentions:#HYSA

You probably don't want to put 100% of your emergency funds in CDs, but they can still be useful for that purpose when combined with HYSA or money market funds. Obviously it depends on the terms of the CD, but usually the penalties are around 60-90 days worth of interest. If you absolutely need the cash it wouldn't be too painful to close the CD in the case of an emergency, which isn't very likely to happen anyways. You can also set up CD ladders, so cash for your emergency fund becomes available at a consistent pace.

Mentions:#HYSA

I read somewhere there's approximately $9tn in money market funds and HYSA's? Idk someone will correct me if I'm wrong. Point is, I think there's a lot more liquidity on the sidelines than you might think.

Mentions:#HYSA

Hi everyone, Where would you park your money once HYSA and MM yields start going down? Emergency fund will remain untouched on a savings account, regardless of its yield. But, I would like to still put my month to month savings into work in something stable with some return (4/5%). Is a REIT a good option?

Mentions:#HYSA#REIT

Read the my whole comment. I have money in a CD AND I have my emergency fund in a HYSA.

Mentions:#HYSA

that's close to where I'm at now. started working and saving 1-2 years ago. I followed a mixture of Dave Ramsey and money guys show's steps. start with $1000 emergency fund, put that into a High Yield Saving account (HYSA) pay off debt and stay out of debt. look up the snowball method or avalanche method build that emergency fund to be $3-6 worth of expenses, or 10k. then start maxing out your 401k and/or Roth IRA (I'm on this step now) I chose mostly tech stocks, so nvidia, AMD, google, Microsoft, apple, etc. I'm at 10k in my HYSA($500 gain since starting), $15900 for my Roth IRA ($4590 gain since starting!)

Mentions:#HYSA#AMD

I'd put it at a firm like Vanguard or Fidelity in a Federal money market fund. Essentially zero risk and the rates are always going to be competitive. With any sort of HYSA, you're not always guaranteed a market rate. When the bank needs deposits (as is the case now for most banks), the rates will be high. However, if they get to where they are more comfortable from a liquidity standpoint, they will likely cut the rate.

Mentions:#HYSA

Unless you’re saving for something big, is there any reason why you’re putting $1k into an HYSA instead of putting it into the stock market? Since you mentioned you already have an emergency fund built up, you might be better off investing that $1k. Again, depends on your use case, so make a decision based on your situation, but just curious.

Mentions:#HYSA

Hi I'm a 23yo that just graduated college I'm looking to put money in Roth IRA and HYSA, could some one give advice on which companies you choose and the pros and cons or which ones you'd advise for me to choose. And of course with the Roth IRA what to invest in. Thank you!

Mentions:#HYSA

I have a. 4 month CD with WF (I know. But my family has been banking with them for 20+ years) and I use CapitalOne’s 360 Performance Savings (HYSA) because I already have a credit card with them, I really like their app interface and it was so quick and easy to open it.

Mentions:#WF#HYSA

If you don’t mind me asking, which/what kind of HYSA are you using? I’m always interested in learning about what people mainly do to park money like an HYSA or a money market fund that could address a similar use case for example.

Mentions:#HYSA

I have done this already. I have $12k in a HYSA. My wife and I each put $250 into it every 2 weeks. So $1000/month. Sorry, forgot to add that part into the post! Also, I have $400 to spend on investments right now. It won’t always be the case. I’m assuming that every 2 weeks I’ll have anywhere from $200-$400 for investing. Thank you for your response!!

Mentions:#HYSA

Fidelity goat platform for investing. I've enjoyed SoFi as my bank. Decent HYSA, no fees for anything, free checks, etc.

Mentions:#HYSA

100% go into a HYSA. 3 of the best I like are SOFI’s, American Express, or Goldman Sachs.

Mentions:#HYSA#SOFI

Just get separate accounts. And then invest in your own baskets of stocks or ETFs. Then go on the trip but remember you will get taxed on gains, and even then it’s a hot market now and you’re buying the top on the market so if it’s short term where you need the money within the next year or so, get a money market fund or HYSA

Mentions:#HYSA

HYSA and MMF are nice right now because the yield curve is inverted and they have been paying 4-5% APY since 2022. However this is not guaranteed to continue and these assets were paying pretty close to zero between 2009-2020. I would personally do a allocation of 60% global equity and 40% domestic intermediate bonds if I needed the money t be there in 10-15 years.

Mentions:#HYSA

Not a financial advisor. This is gonna sound boring, but if you just want to enjoy the next 20 years, only YOU can answer what you’re willing to give up 20 years from now in exchange. You can buy a Tesla cash tomorrow, and the $75k hole you burn won’t matter for years. But if you stuck that $75k in VOO tomorrow, in 20 years it could realistically be $300k, which is probably what your 3 year old will need to pay their student loans off at 23. That sounds harsh, but it is the reality of spending and investing - Tesla today or 300k for the toys of the future at 60 years old. If I were you, I’d keep half of that $220k parked in HYSA while the rates are high. With $110,000 you’re still making great interest and far from 25k FIDC insurance limit. Slap the other 110k into VOO. VOO already has Apple NVIDIA etc. baked in and doesn’t cost anymore than mix and matching yourself all day. Then, with your 70k a year from VA, set at least $250 a week of automatic purchases of VOO - that’s truly set and forget, and just make sure your checking account isn’t ever super low that the $250 makes too big of a dent. If you REALLY want to trade for fun, try playing with $1000 dollars and pretending it’s 100k and do “fun stuff” for a couple months (no options) like buying a fractional meme stock or something. If you make a decent amount, add just a little to the pile each week alongside your VOO buys - maybe even replace altogether since you’ll still have that nice 220k nest growing 5-10% a year between voo and HYSA. Also can max Roth IRA if you make the smart call that you will want some funds 20 years from now so that’s tax free on gains. For your kids, if you DO want to support their future, maybe stick a portion of your 220k pile into a 529 plan instead of a regular brokerage. That’s tax free gains for any school stuff so you can make sure at 55, while you’ve been living your life, you can still help them out with their school so they can start saving debt free at 21 instead of 40 - likely something you could amicably convince your Ex/father to help contribute too as well since you implied they have the means. For the non stock fun stuff - lease a pricey car for a couple months maybe to see if that makes you happier - if it doesn’t, buy a mini van and be a dad. Discover what specifically you love most in the world, and if spending 5k to make it happen is necessary, then just do it. That’s living your life - but This also all depends on how much you even have after paying for all your life expenses, Do make sure your pile still always gains year over year. Life at 60 will be harsh to you if you still only have 200k and cost of living is then doubled. You’d maybe realize then that you have more life to live, but then be financially trapped with two adult children you have to spend money on to visit. You definitely have more life experience than me, so grains of salt, and you’re gonna have to figure it out for you, but hopefully this is helpful. Also thank you for your service. Not a financial advisor.

Mentions:#VOO#HYSA

If your goal is just to beat the HYSA consistently, something that rolls the shortest term treasuries like BIL or SGOV is fine. If you want to gamble on more rate cuts happening there are all sorts of ETFs of different duration but I wouldn't do that.

Are there specifics one should be looking into when deciding which TBill ETF? How to compare to a HYSA rate and time range, etc.?

Mentions:#HYSA

Yes as long as it is a TBills ETF and will yield far higher with less risk than HYSA. If you have enough cash, it might exceed the $250,000 FDIC limit. Plus TBills are backed by the Federal government, not a government agency.

Mentions:#HYSA