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r/investingSee Post

Would you set stop losses on index funds?

r/investingSee Post

32 years old, how can I improve my 401k?

r/stocksSee Post

How should I weight my investment in VOO or VTSAX?

r/investingSee Post

Seeking Suggestions for Parents After Disappointing Financial Advisor Experience

r/investingSee Post

VTIAX vs. VTSAX, how much of the VTIAX under performance is due to the strong Dollar?

r/investingSee Post

Exploring the Role of Global Tech ETFs for Younger Investors

r/investingSee Post

Lump sum - VTSAX or diversify?

r/investingSee Post

Good time to buy Bond funds in Brokerage account?

r/investingSee Post

Question about moving money from one index fund to another

r/investingSee Post

Random question about ETF prices

r/investingSee Post

Why are prices for Vanguard funds (VTSAX, etc) different on some sites compared to others?

r/investingSee Post

Any reason to not go all in VOO/SPY for retirement?

r/investingSee Post

I have a Vanguard Brokerage account, and just opened a Roth IRA. Should I transfer the funds to max out my Roth IRA?

r/StockMarketSee Post

Portfollio allocation after move from edward jones

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

To option or not to option, that is the question

r/investingSee Post

Tax gain harvesting on Vanguard

r/investingSee Post

Was gifted large (to me) sum of money

r/stocksSee Post

VTSAX and VTI

r/investingSee Post

Sunk cost fallacy? Advice appreciated!

r/investingSee Post

Best aggressive investment strategy/fund type (long-time horizon)

r/investingSee Post

The "average" returns of an index fund aren't average at all

r/investingSee Post

IRS - Wash Rule Specifics

r/stocksSee Post

Do you think I can sell my VLXVX?

r/investingSee Post

Beginning Automatic Investing: Need direction

r/stocksSee Post

Bag holding at big losses

r/investingSee Post

30 year-old asset allocation on Betterment

r/investingSee Post

2045 Vanguard Retirement Fund… underwhelming

r/investingSee Post

Do I start Investing at 16?

r/investingSee Post

Advice request - Hold ‘em or fold em?

r/investingSee Post

Vanguard account restricted for 90 days. Can I still contribute to my 2023 backdoor roth ira?

r/investingSee Post

Moving Roth IRA from Schwab to Vanguard

r/investingSee Post

Here's why you should stop looking at the $$$ figures in your portfolio and look at this number instead

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Vanguard is scamming mutual fund buyers

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Vanguard is scamming mutual fund buyers.

r/investingSee Post

Negative Index Fund Growth

r/stocksSee Post

Negative Index Fund Growth

r/investingSee Post

Why buy bonds if the yield has been consistently negative?

r/investingSee Post

Lesson learned from Bond market crash, why did I buy VUSUX with yield to maturity at 1.3% again?

r/investingSee Post

The confusion with Index Funds

r/investingSee Post

Looking for advice on 401k allocations

r/investingSee Post

Where should I invest my post tax money?

r/investingSee Post

Need advice on 7 year plan

r/investingSee Post

Stuck with current employer's limited 401K fund offerings, looking for advice on distributions

r/investingSee Post

Need help unloading Apple

r/investingSee Post

What ETF should I invest in in my Taxable brokerage

r/investingSee Post

Vanguard Yield Underwhelming

r/investingSee Post

Investing into stocks and I.F

r/investingSee Post

Should I move VTSAX funds to HYSA?

r/investingSee Post

What To Choose for Vanguard

r/investingSee Post

Saving 3k per month for a year. Advice to kick-start growing my wealth?

r/investingSee Post

Why are the Vanguard market ETFs typically recommended much more often than "equivalent" funds from other large brokerages?

r/investingSee Post

My Unconventional Investing Strategy

r/investingSee Post

Adjusting projected investment returns for taxable accounts

r/investingSee Post

I have 103k in my savings(HYSA) Where should I invest?

r/stocksSee Post

Where to invest to FIRE in 10 years?

r/investingSee Post

Rate my portfolio please: 30% VTSAX - 25% MSCI - 20% QQQ - 15% VLXVX - 10% SUSA

r/StockMarketSee Post

Which stocks should we omit?

r/stocksSee Post

Need some 401k investment advice!

r/investingSee Post

Empty Roth IRAs to Pay Off Rental?

r/investingSee Post

I have a Vanguard self managed brokerage account. Take a look at my holdings.

r/investingSee Post

I am 35 and earning $250k per annum. I have 100k in HYSA, 100k in 401k and started Backdoor roth this year. Expenses: $3.8k/month mortgage. I am starting to invest money in HSA and wanted some advice. The funds BOFA HSA offers are listed in details. No VTSAX. What's the closest thing here.

r/investingSee Post

What would you do, suggestions?

r/investingSee Post

Sell Mutual Funds in Brokerage Account to Fund the Same Mutual Funds in Roth IRA?

r/stocksSee Post

I’m tired of paying $75 to trade VTSAX…

r/investingSee Post

Will negative population growth in the US in the next 20 years cause a stagnant market?

r/investingSee Post

Am I in the right index funds?

r/investingSee Post

Are there any downsides to investing in VOO, VTI, & VTSAX in brokerages other than Vanguard? + Question about VTI vs VTSAX

r/investingSee Post

New to this, better to wait for a recession before I start investing? Different strategies?

r/investingSee Post

Invest lump sum or invest monthly for retirement. I recently sold a home and made 100k. I have military and will have federal pensions for security as well. I did some rough numbers below and seems like a no brained to invest a lump sum and drop my monthly investments.

r/investingSee Post

401k rollover method is so antiquated

r/investingSee Post

Please be honest.. Are my 401k Management Fees That Bad Compared to Average? 0.70% Total Annual Operating Expenses ($7.00 per $1000).

r/investingSee Post

Asset Allocation - International

r/investingSee Post

Solid data comparing S&P500 index returns to Total Market index returns over the last 30 years?

r/investingSee Post

I'm selling my VTSAX shares and enjoying vanguards 5% money market rate for the rest of the year.

r/investingSee Post

What fund would you choose and why?

r/StockMarketSee Post

Strategy for losses

r/optionsSee Post

Day trading options while holding similar index funds, wash sale?

r/investingSee Post

Vanguard Diversity Funds... Are the areas they put your money into the same with the same name? i.e. are the Energy, Healthcare, Financials, etc, the same group of companies or does each fund diversify different companies within those categories?

r/investingSee Post

Which make more money: Mutual Funds or ETF’s?

r/investingSee Post

SGOV or BND in 2 fund strategy?

r/stocksSee Post

Is my Roth IRA oversaturated ? (21 Y/O investor)

r/investingSee Post

Recommendations for long term stock portfolio involving index funds.

r/stocksSee Post

I have invested half a million into a fintech, help me balance my portfolio

r/investingSee Post

I’m a 18M and wanting to save/invest in my retirement

r/investingSee Post

3-Fund Portfolio Comparison: Vanguard, Schwab, Fidelity

r/stocksSee Post

I have already missed out on $900K for being financially illiterate. If you’re young, don’t make my mistake. Start early.

r/investingSee Post

Capital Gains Distribution (Mutual Funds vs ETFs)

r/investingSee Post

Inherited $50k in stocks. Where should I invest?

r/investingSee Post

VTI/VTSAX/VOO differences

r/investingSee Post

How much money should I Put into my brokerage account annually?

r/investingSee Post

How to calculate actual difference between FSKAX and VTI for taxable account

r/investingSee Post

Advice for an overwhelmed 18-year-old! (Roth IRA's and more!)

r/investingSee Post

Do I have too much overlap?

r/investingSee Post

Do I have too much overlap?

r/StockMarketSee Post

VTSAX vs. VOO - Total Stock Market vs. S&P 500 Funds

r/investingSee Post

Investments without a 401k?

r/investingSee Post

Short-term move from VTSAX to Ally?

r/investingSee Post

Is paying a transaction fee worth it to use Vangaurd?

r/StockMarketSee Post

VFIAX vs. VTSAX - Vanguard 500 vs. Vanguard Total Stock Market

r/investingSee Post

Rate my portfolio………………….

Mentions

Need some advice. In 2020 I was dumb enough to buy 2k worth of Ark funds in my Roth. Fast forward to now and I’m down a lot on those. Should I just keep whatever’s left of it or sell it and buy what the majority of my Roth is, VTSAX? Thanks!

Mentions:#VTSAX

VTSAX VOO and VGT just because those are my biggest positions lol 😆

Been investing for a few years - VTSAX 100%

Mentions:#VTSAX

VTSAX and check back every decade

Mentions:#VTSAX

With more than $50k, and looking to go lazy: VTSAX, Total stock (admiral) VTIAX, International (admiral) VBTLX, Bonds (admiral) Getting to the next level ($500k invested will get you some nice perks as well). :)

Dude would lose money holding VTSAX over 30 years

Mentions:#VTSAX

>Who would win? VTSAX

Mentions:#VTSAX

No. I know have Tesla in my 401k and Roth IRAs in those account using VTSAX. I do not get ability to vote on Elon’s pay as much as voting on annual proxy vote.

Mentions:#VTSAX

You’re in the right track. VTSAX and chill is an excellent choice. 

Mentions:#VTSAX

No money lost. Just holding it in my long term index funds like VTSAX, so not actively trading it (though occasionally I sell options against big moves). Yeah, he has created a lot of wealth for shareholders, cannot deny that.

Mentions:#VTSAX

I'm 17, almost 18, live in the US (Oregon), and I'm going to college next year (NYU). I currently have a checking account with around $11,500 in it and I get an allowance of $1,500 monthly, most of which I don't use (gas and occasional miscellaneous purchases is all). I'm looking for a way to invest the money over the next around 6 years I'm in college (4 undergrad, 2 grad) so that when I get out I have a nice nest egg that I could use or just continue investing in if I wanted to. I've done some research, and mutual funds seem like the way to go in terms of low risk, low management for someone who isn't looking to constantly check their portfolio and instead just accrue interest. In doing some research, it looks like a good place to start would be Vanguard's Total Stock Market Index Fund (VTSAX) given its low fees, diversified investments, and good reputation. If I were to invest the money, I would initially invest a lump sum of $9,000 and then continue to invest around $750 automatically each month so that I still have a good bit saved in checking for liquidity (quick and easy access really) purposes. TLDRing the general questions: * I'm 17 and live in the US (Oregon) * Not employed, but get a monthly allowance of $1,500 that I use on gas and occasional eating out purchases (most of it goes unused and is sitting in a checking account) * Objective is to start investing as early as possible and actually make use of the money that's sitting in the checking account. * Time is initially 6 years (undergrad + grad school) but can extend beyond if I don't need immediate access to it * I am not willing to gamble with it, I want something safe and trusted, hence the leaning towards Vanguard's fund. * Just the $11,500 in the checking account, no prior experience to investing. * No big debts or expenses Just looking for what the adults think, and whether this is a good direction to move in, or if I'm making a horrible mistake and should steer clear etc. Thank you for any and all help!

Mentions:#VTSAX

Erm... so did I. VTSAX

Mentions:#VTSAX

They track the same thing, I think they have the same costs or one basis point difference, doesn’t matter what you have in either, you can just consider it the one lump amount invested in the total US market. Also I think, but don’t know, that Vanguard can convert your VTSAX stake into VTI, but not the other way around. Not sure if there are costs and taxable events involved, you can find out.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

Is there a benefit to investing in VTI over VTSAX??

Mentions:#VTI#VTSAX

I use mutual funds rather than ETFs, both because that's how I started investing and the ability to make recurring scheduled deposits. I'm about 70/20/10 equity/bonds/cash \~5 years from retirement. VTSAX (or similar) makes up about 80% of my equity and VTIAX the other 20%. The bonds are VBTLX and the cash is iBonds and VUSXX. If I was 30 again, I'd probably have the domestic/international ratio the same, but I'd be at least 90% in equities if not 100% like you are. While I've always been 70-80% stocks, I probably should have taken on more risk in my 30s and early 40s.

The only constant trade I make nowadays is just a $1000 monthly recurring investment in VTSAX. And it’s been hitting to be honest.

Mentions:#VTSAX

>"The simple Path to wealth" I've found his reasoning for US only to be very poorly supported (and that's being generous). I can point you to over a dozen links showing why going global is probably a better idea. >Or did the book just mislead me to only stare on the US stock market. I would argue yes, it did (and given that you're not in the US, it would be even worse advice). I always forget which subreddits allow which links (other than Bogleheads and Personal Finance), so I'll link you to a recent post in one of those subreddits where I had everything: https://www.reddit.com/r/Bogleheads/s/aeu2bBu5dD Additional links and pieces of info not present in that version of the list: The only type of risk that US only is, is single country risk, which is an *uncompensated* risk: one that doesn't bring higher expected long term returns. Uncompensated risk should be avoided whenever possible. Compensated vs uncompensated risk: * https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/uncompensated-risk/ * https://www.pwlcapital.com/is-investing-risky-yes-and-no/ >Uncompensated risk is very different; it is the risk specific to an individual company, sector, **or country.** * Going global can also help increase sector diversification. As of the 31st of January 2024 (the most recent info available when I last updated this), the US is 31.9% technology (according to VTSAX: https://investor.vanguard.com/investment-products/mutual-funds/profile/vtsax#portfolio-composition). Ex-US (according to data from the 31st of January 2024 from https://www.schwab.wallst.com/Prospect/Research/mutualfunds/portfolio.asp?symbol=vtiax since Vanguard for some reason doesn't provide a breakdown of VTIAX sectors themselves, at least in an easy to find location) technology is only 12.5% and only financials are above 20% at 20.1%. Be aware that this is using GICS classifications, which put Google, Tesla, Facebook/Meta, and Amazon outside tech, so if you go by what the common person would think of as tech instead of GICS, that's even higher. * https://www.dimensional.com/us-en/insights/global-diversification-still-requires-international-securities - Companies will act more like the market of their home country, so foreign revenue isn't the international exposure that matters (this one was actually freshly added this morning!) Consider a total world fund. One of the below may be suitable: European VT/All World Equivalents: * VWRL * VWRA * VWCE * VWRP * VWRD

Yeah, the equal weighted S&P and Dow are having some difficulty pushing off here, and I’d say the main reason they held up for Monday and Tuesday was flows related (the Russell and other small cap trackers not recovering for those days should tell you that). The Nasdaq, and most specifically, NVDA (as this ATH was set without more 52 week highs by the Nasdaq Composite), doing nasty things is how the S&P and VTSAX are at an ATH.

Mentions:#NVDA#VTSAX

nice try. the VTSAX that is 25% mag 7? you just proved his point

Mentions:#VTSAX

VTSAX is at an all time high 

Mentions:#VTSAX

To help new reader , let me summarize this post out from 150 replies, 80% folks suggested, VT, VTSAX, SMH, VOO, spy, VFIAX QQQ SCHD and a few other ETFs. individual stocks that are suggested 1. space mobile ASTS 2 TELL. 3 MSFT META GOOG and other mega techs. Vehicle : auto invest voted by 90% folks. I probably will do auto invest barbell strategy into some of the ETFs based on this post. thank every one who replied.

I'm holding VTSAX and regret nothing.

Mentions:#VTSAX

Buying a stock that takes off doesn't make you smart, it's just luck. You can't know which one will take off, and you can easily buy one that craters instead. The smart, non-gambling play is to buy an index fund like VTSAX/VTI.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

I have some play money that I use to fuck around with individual stock but it is a pretty small amount of my portfolio that wouldn't break me even if it went to $0. Most of my portfolio is in broad index funds or the ETFs that track them like VTSAX or VTI and their international equivalents. I use Vfmxx and vusxx as my pretend-HYSA

VTI vs VTSAX - benefits to choosing VTSAX because it's cheaper? With these two being basically the same, is there any benefit in choosing VTSAX because it's cheaper to buy than VTI? As you can buy more shares going with VTSAX, was just curious Thank you!

Mentions:#VTI#VTSAX

Trust me I'm a dumbass. Only good plays I have in my personal account is VTSAX and MSFT/AAPL and those are only around 50% gains over the past few years.

Yep I pretty much have been aggressively saving everything into VTSAX since I graduated 10 years ago, maxing Roth IRA and 401k. This account is going to be the bridge to Roth IRA conversion ladder. Fortunately we're not having kids but we've already set up 529's for all our nieces.

Mentions:#VTSAX

You can auto-invest at Vanguard either in a TDF or in a selection of mutual funds. So if you would prefer a portfolio composition other than the ones available in Vanguard's TDFs, you can buy and hold either VTWAX and VBTLX, or VTSAX, VTIAX, and VBTLX, and choose allocation percentages that align with your preference/risk tolerance. Unlike with ETFs, Vanguard will allow you to auto-invest into the mutual fund share classes.

All in on VTSAX. It’s like a coin flip that takes 30 years but you have a 95% chance of x8’ing your money.

Mentions:#VTSAX

100% VTSAX in a UTMA, then let it grow. Tax gain harvest it yearly up to the free max for dependents ($2,600 in 2024). Don’t forget to include the dividends in that $2,600 total, as VTSAX’s yearly dividend yield is ~1.6%. 

Mentions:#VTSAX

Sell calls and put money into mix of VTSAX and T-Bills.

Mentions:#VTSAX

Just keep putting whatever you can in VTSAX!! It’s been returning and average of 11.9%

Mentions:#VTSAX

With your history I'm going to say $50 should consistently go in every week to a ETF like VTSAX Slow and steady wins the race

Mentions:#VTSAX

Same. VTI/VTSAX not available in my employer funds, so my 401(k) $ has been in a diversified mix of funds with a 75/25 split. 2/3 of stock funds are in S&P index fund. 25% in large and mid cap growth and the rest spread around small cap and international. Non-qualified money is 80/20 VTI and individual treasuries/corporate/municipal bonds. Averaged about 8% for 21 years.

Mentions:#VTI#VTSAX

11%. Mostly Vanguard VTSAX/VTI (about 80%). But the key has been 1) We save about 30% of our income, including maxing 401K contributions, 2) we invest quarterly in our portfolio regardless of market conditions, 3) we have no debt except for a 15 year mortgage, which we have about 9 years left on. Probably helping is that we moved from a city where (the appearance of) wealth was important to a smaller town where nobody gives a crap what kind of car you drive.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

Just started my VTSAX journey in my 30s, I’m late but excited

Mentions:#VTSAX

Same. I made a boatload in AAPL to the point it was too big a piece of my portfolio. In 2019, I sold and moved it all into VTSAX. Probably lost a bit of returns by doing that, but I’m very comfortable I made the correct move. And it’s not like VTSAX hasn’t been great over that horizon.

Mentions:#AAPL#VTSAX

VTSAX is a mutual fund with Vanguard. If your with Robinhood use VTI.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

I see VTV etf. Can’t find VTSAX on Robinhood for some reason. I’ll check vanguard

Mentions:#VTV#VTSAX

I did something similar with Amazon back in the day. finally mix shifted it to VTSAX in 2021. could I have gotten more sure but this was a good backstop

Mentions:#VTSAX

VTSAX and chill.

Mentions:#VTSAX

Amazon under $100, same with GOOG, VTSAX dca around 90, nvda under 475, AMD $80 dca. 350k in early 2022 in the above stocks is worth 510k now.

Couldn't you also just do a total market index fund like VTSAX to get the small and mid cap all in one?

Mentions:#VTSAX

Index funds are a great place to start. They are popular because they offer broad market exposure and tend to have lower fees. A couple of solid options are VTSAX, VTIAX, VOO and SPY. Diversifying your investments is key to managing risk. A good mix might be 60% in a total stock market index fund, 20% in an international stock index fund, and 20% in bonds or a bond index fund for stability. Also make sure you keep some cash in a HYSA for emergencies, usually 3-6 months worth of expenses.

r/stocksSee Comment

VTSAX and let it ride.

Mentions:#VTSAX
r/stocksSee Comment

Open a vanguard account. Deposit 80k into the settlement fund. It’s essentially a high yield savings that you can make stock purchases from. Once that 80k is confirmed, buy: 30k VTI 20k VGT 10k BRK B Those stay in your taxable brokerage account. Keep the remaining 20k in the settlement fund. In January, open a Roth IRA account in Vanguard. Buy 7k of VTSAX. You would then have 13k remaining in January to be used as a safety net if needed. If you don’t need it, use some to buy more stocks in your brokerage account. Save 7k to deposit into your IRA in 2026. Congrats!

Index funds are market cap weighted, so if you start adding in smaller companies you are technically more diversified but the smaller companies barely move the needle one way or another. I am 100% VTSAX in my IRA and 100% VOO in my taxable brokerage. I view them as being essentially the same because any small company in VTSAX that grows a ton will be part of VOO by the time their market cap starts to make a difference to me.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VOO

How about VTSAX?

Mentions:#VTSAX

VTSAX-Vanguard total stock market. 148%

Mentions:#VTSAX

You are welcome. For a very brief $.50 tour.. $VTI is Vanguard's whole US market ETF with market cap weighted split across the whole us market (large, mid and small cap). It covers all of these segments, and is self balancing/regulating over time.. no need to monitor the splits or make adjustments. $VOO is Vanguard's S$P 500 fund (equivalent of $SPY) and has roughly 85% overlap with $VTI (the other 15% being the mid and small caps not included in the S&P 500). At the end of the day, these two perform nearly identically (to date). IMHO, either is a great choice when building this first block of your nest egg/net worth. Don't let the "expensiveness" of individual share price of any of ETF's/Index Funds. That is just a reflective price of the unit size of each ETF. In basic terms, most people understand that 10 dimes and 20 nickels have the same equivalent value of $1.00. If two ETF's track the exact same index and have different share prices, they just have different unit sizes (e.g. individual coin values) and what's important is the total value of the asset you're accumulating (i.e. how many dollars of those coins). A very easy example of this is $SPY at $530/share vs $V00 at $487/share. Functionally, they are equivalent and should rise at a similar/same % reflective of the market. 1% increase in S&P 500 results in $5.30 increase in $SPY share price vs. $4.87 in $VOO. My recommendation is get that first $xx0,000 of Index Funds built up so that regardless of your individual stock performance, your portfolio should trend upward with the market over time. My personal pick was choosing VTI/VXUS/VTSAX or an equivalent S&P 500 fund based on which account had access to what investments to build the the foundation of my account. I'm still chasing a few mile stones in these accounts before shifting any focus towards individual stocks again. If you want to learn more, I recommend checking out r/Bogleheads and consider reading Ramit Sethi's *I Will Teach You to be Rich.* It's worth investing time & money in your own personal finance knowledge, and I'll happily acknowledge also considering "alternate opinions" to be a well rounded person. Some other commenters may provide counter points or other ideologies.. study them, see if they resonate true with you or instead help validate your learnings from others schools of thought.

VTSAX...and walk away

Mentions:#VTSAX

VTSAX and VTI are the same fund. The fund has $1.5 trillion AUM. The VTSAX share class is $355 billion.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

Why dont we invest ETFs like VOO, VTI, VTSAX, etc.?

r/stocksSee Comment

Guess I like boring. The only tickers I’ve ever purchased are VTSAX and FZROX starting 13 years ago and I’ve never sold a share.

Mentions:#VTSAX#FZROX

People screamed that the market was overpriced last year and I'm up over 20% on my principal just buying VTSAX every month

Mentions:#VTSAX

In addition to what the others have said, I’d add that there are some relatively minor mechanical differences in how exchange traded funds (3-4 letters) and mutual funds (five letters, ending in X) operate.  Specifically, mutual funds get repriced at the end of the day, and that’s also when any buys and sells happen. This hardly matters for buy & hold folks, but for someone who feels they’re prone to gambling that inability to trade in the moment can be a benefit.  Another thing to look out for with mutual funds is buy & sell fees. Fidelity wont charge anything to buy their own funds (like FXAIX or FSKAX) or most others, but they do charge if you want to buy a *Vanguard* mutual fund (like VTSAX, but not exchange-traded funds like VOO & VTI).  Mutual funds can also be slightly easier to buy automatically. With my Fidelity accounts I could tell it to invest all deposits, regardless of amount or timing, into a certain slate of mutual funds. With ETFs you’re a little more limited, typically predictable timing and amounts like “$100 to VOO every Tuesday”.

>the cost of VTI is a lot lower than VOO Let's start here. The price of a "share" of an exchange-traded fund (ETF) or mutual fund doesn't matter, especially on an exchange that allows you to buy fractional shares. The fund's share price moves up or down with the value of a selection of stocks held by the fund, or with an "index" that represents a selection of stocks. Whatever price you pay for the fund, it will go up or down with the stocks that the fund represents. If an index goes up 10%, a $1 share of a fund based on that index will rise to $1.10, and a $100 share will rise to $110. You just need to decide how much you want to invest, and then buy that much of the fund, however many shares of the fund that may be. VOO and FXAIX both move with the S&P 500 Index, which is a selection of 500 of the highest-valued companies on the US stock market. VOO is an exchange-traded fund, so it can be bought or sold like a stock, at changing prices throughout the trading day. FXAIX is a mutual fund, so you place an order for any dollar amount of the fund, and it is filled after the market closes, based on the closing prices of the S&P 500 stocks that day. I have some ETFs in my trading account, so I can sell them quickly if I see an opportunity to buy a stock with the money. Most of my fund investments, though, are mutual funds, because I just want to buy and hold them. I am happy to pay the closing price at the end of the day, without worrying about the fund's price movements during the day. VTI is an exchange-traded fund based on the CRSP US Total Market Index, so it represents all the stocks in the S&P 500 plus thousands of smaller US companies. Vanguard sells both VTI and its mutual-fund equivalent, VTSAX. The Total Market Index gives big companies more weight than small companies, so the Total Market Index's movements are similar to the movements of the S&P 500. The Total Market Index gives the big companies a bit less weight and therefore is not moved as much when one or a few big companies have a big price swing. There are thousands of exchange-traded funds and mutual funds. Many of them are actively managed, with unique portfolios that aren't based on any index. Those actively managed funds have higher fees taken out, because professional stock pickers are expensive. The biggest funds, though, are based on stock indexes, so they don't need active management and therefore have lower fees. Probably the two most popular stock indexes are the S&P 500 and the US Total Market, so you have identified good funds to start with. You can then decide whether you want to buy ETFs (e.g. VOO or VTI) or their equivalent mutual funds (e.g. FXAIX or VTSAX). Since you write that you aren't interested in trading in and out of the funds, I suggest buying the mutual funds. Whether you go with the S&P 500 Index or the Total Market Index is open to endless debate, but it doesn't make much difference because the indexes move similarly.

Yes, that's why individuals should buy the entire market in low expense, broad index funds. This is why things like VTI and VTSAX are so popular.

Mentions:#VTI#VTSAX

I mean you say that but by assets one Mutual Funds trounce ETFs by a fair margin. VTSAX one has 1.5 trillion AUM, the largest ETF(SPY) is just about 500B. I prefer mutual funds myself, but I hear Vanguard is soon going to offer automatic ETF investment. If that's true I'll switch over since why pay more in fees even if it's 0.01

Mentions:#VTSAX#SPY

It may be different in your country, but in the US, you can buy ETFs through any broker while many index mutual funds are available to one or a few brokers. Like you can recommend VTI without knowing what broker someone has, just their country, but you can't do the same for VTSAX/FZROX/SWTSX.

They're essentially the same thing, and often actually represent the same underlying fund (for example VTI is identical to VTSAX).

Mentions:#VTI#VTSAX

Just put it in VTSAX. NVDA - earnings last week caused it to pump to all time high of $1069 (as of now in post market). Analysts say it’s got maybe another $100-200 in it. Maybe it will maybe it won’t. If in July next earnings isn’t exceptional it will drop Intel- they have missed the boat on AI when compared to NVDA. They have a new chip to compete with chips the Nvidia sold last year. SMCI - similar to NVDA, huge gains but if next quarter they meet or miss projections there will be a huge sell off

Good point, actually if you look at the top 10 holdings of VTSAX almost all of them have an AI play

Mentions:#VTSAX

Literally came here to say this. OP needs to understand he is absolutely investing in AI‘s biggest winners right now through VTSAX. Nvidia and Microsoft, and other other public traded company benefiting from AI in the market, is in VTSAX.

Mentions:#VTSAX

Worth pointing out that VTSAX holds 4.21% in NVDA, so you already have about $7,500 in there. I don't have an opinion on buying or selling it

Mentions:#VTSAX#NVDA

70% individual stocks. Mostly tech. Bagholding some bullshit that didn’t pay out. VTSAX 30%

Mentions:#VTSAX

It’s important to consider that Collins has written about his devotion to VTSAX being a result of his own biases in subsequent blog posts after he published The Simple Path to Wealth. I recommend reading his post on [Investing for Seven Generations](https://jlcollinsnh.com/2019/03/03/stocks-part-xxxv-investing-for-seven-generations/), in which he surmises that a world fund such as VTWAX is the better choice for his daughter and younger generations and he plans to reshape his portfolio toward VTWAX in preparation for leaving it to her. A excerpt from that post: “In considering such a move, am I signaling a change of heart on the need for international investments? Not really. My stand is still the same as in that post: Investing solely in the US has distinct advantages. However, the world is changing and at some point a world fund will be the best choice. Indeed, this is already my suggestion for my non-US based readers. The US is the only market in the world that allows for this investing only domestically bias, and that is simply because the US is so dominant on the world economic stage. I expect this to remain the case for sometime and very likely for the rest of my lifetime. However, I tell my daughter to be alert because in the future this may well no longer be the case. This doesn’t mean I expect the US to decline. Rather I expect the rest of the world to continue to improve, for the overall pie to continue to grow and for the US slice, while also growing, to simply become a smaller percentage.” Keep in mind that Collins’s wealth is in a taxable account, so he can’t just dump VTSAX for VTWAX all at once. I agree with Cruian that, starting from scratch, VTWAX (or VT, or VTI + VXUS) is the better approach than just VTSAX alone.

Me too, purely for entertainment value. VTSAX and chill.

Mentions:#VTSAX

Vanguard total stock market index fund VTSAX (US stocks). Vanguard total world stock ETF (VT) is everything.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VT

VTSAX and chill.

Mentions:#VTSAX

To each their own, but I moved my 401k, Roth IRA, and HSA all from retirement target date funds over to S&P 500 indexes (depending on the broker) and my taxable account to VTSAX. The expense ratios on target funds were much higher and even the year-2050 one was not keeping up with the S&P. So I'm all stocks right now, no bonds. As I get closer to retirement I'm sure I'll reallocate, but not now.

Mentions:#VTSAX

>For the "Bogleheads": VTSAX, VFAIX, or THREE FUND? Pinned to the top of this subreddit: Single fund portfolios: https://www.reddit.com/r/Bogleheads/comments/tg1az5/should_i_invest_in_x_index_fund_a_simple_faq/ >(Followed JL Collins advice in Simple Path to Wealth) I find his reasoning flawed and poorly supported. >My justification for 100% Total US market allocation is that we can weather the storm over the years since we are so young. >Is this naive? Would we be better served if we changed to: The only type of risk that US only is, is single country risk, which is an *uncompensated* risk: one that doesn't bring higher expected long term returns. Uncompensated risk should be avoided whenever possible. Compensated vs uncompensated risk: * https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/uncompensated-risk/ * https://www.pwlcapital.com/is-investing-risky-yes-and-no/ >Uncompensated risk is very different; it is the risk specific to an individual company, sector, **or country.** >Would we be better served if we changed to: 1) 100% VFIAX S&P 500 would mean missing out on the area in the US with the best historical and expected future long term returns: smaller caps (especially the value corner). * https://www.pwlcapital.com/should-you-invest-in-the-sp-500-index - invest in the S&P 500, but don't end there (this covers info on both the US extended market and ex-US markets) [a total US market fund combines S&P 500 + extended market into one] >2)60% VTSAX, 30% VTIAX, 10% BND There we go. >3) Some other recommendation I am not thinking of? Target date (index), target allocation (index), or VT/VTWAX can all work as well, depending on how you want to handle bonds and if you'd prefer a fixed US to ex-US or one that drifts with global market cap weight changes.

VTSAX is a fund. The index it tracks is CRSP US Total Market Index.

Mentions:#VTSAX#CRSP

Index funds are stocks. If you buy VTSAX (total U.S. stock market) for example, 6% of that is going to be Microsoft. I would just put it all in VTSAX or similar and keep some allocation in a bond fund if you would like X months/years of cash available, then keep 6 months in something more liquid like a HYSA or money market (if you live in a state with income tax then VUSXX).

Many folks in this sub reject the smart plays like VTSAX or VT and chill. Most of them think they can pick winners like Warren Buffett and think they can beat market makers like Ken Griffin. The recency bias of growth and tech fuels their egos and most of them have never endured a serious downturn. P.T. Barnum said they're born every minute, so there's an endless supply of downvotes for rationality.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VT

How much would all that effort into VTSAX have made her?

Mentions:#VTSAX

Inshallah my VTSAX is doing well 🙏

Mentions:#VTSAX

>how to be positioned going forward Stop trying to pick winners and losers. Just buy and hold a total market index fund like VTSAX (VTI) and focus on improving your income and your savings rate to add fuel to that portfolio. Increasing your earning power and your savings rate will have far more effect on the success of your portfolio. The value premium, if it ever truly existed, disappeared after Fama and French published their paper on it. When all the active fund managers read that there was this theoretical value premium and then chased it, the price of value increased in response to that demand and the premium vanished like a mirage in the desert. Folks like Paul Merriman recruit a fanatical following by preaching about small-cap value, but as Rick Ferri and others point out, you can't invest in historical returns without a time machine. The reality is that *no one* can predict whether growth or value will lead over any given period of time. That is why the sensible strategy is a total market index fund, so that you collect your share of the returns from *both* growth and value, and can focus on things that you actually have control over, like your earning power and savings rate.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

Check the fees that you have associated with each plan. If you click on the underlined text in the center row it should open up a bunch of info on each index. The FEES are really important because if you are at .9% vs .03% over your whole life you are scalping yourself 1.000s of dollars. Pick low fee, broad indexes, if there are a few that I don’t see that cover the entire market like VTSAX, those are excellent with low fees. The 2065 is fine. Maybe also spread it 40/40/20 with two other funds that give you some variety in terms of what you are putting your money into (2065, a large growth, and a high yield perhaps?) no a FA

Mentions:#VTSAX#FA

A Roth IRA is an account. You invest your money inside the account. So when you put your money in, you will then direct the money into a mutual fund or ETF. Best to use a total market index, like VTSAX or VTI.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

VTSAX and chill

Mentions:#VTSAX

I hate buying VTSAX at ATH every month but it's been paying off lol

Mentions:#VTSAX

I'm still confused. It's impossible to know what will have a "better" return because I can't see the future. The individual shares might skyrocket or crash but a mutual fund like VTSAX will have steady growth over the next 10 years.

Mentions:#VTSAX

Not as good as VTSAX (VTI) but still fine.

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

If OP's account is at Fidelity (which their use of FXAIX would usually suggest), they're get charged a $75 fee for every VTSAX purchase. They'd want to stick with Fidelity mutual funds (FSKAX and FZROX are their versions of VTSAX) or ETFs from any issuer.

I was going to suggest VTSAX but that’s really up to you and may not provide better returns. Both are good but you can read up on it in this post: [FXIAX vs VTSAX](https://www.reddit.com/r/Bogleheads/s/IByBz8aXvD)

Mentions:#VTSAX