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Derivation Paths

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Iancoleman Tool for BIP86 (Taproot)?

r/BitcoinSee Post

BIP38 BIP39 and Bitcoin Core

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BIP Full list?

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Should OP_CAT be activated?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Then They (REALLY) Fight You!

r/BitcoinSee Post

All bip39 words on 2048 limited edition handmade mugs

r/BitcoinSee Post

A Fork of CLN Implemented Eltoo Useful for Channel Factories Available for Testing

r/BitcoinSee Post

Need Help Deriving Extended Private Key from Bitcoin Root Extended Public Key and Non-Hardened Extended Private Key

r/BitcoinSee Post

Is it normal for the majority of your seed words to start with the same letter?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Need Advice with Crypto Wallets - Hardware vs Mobile Wallets

r/BitcoinSee Post

Entropy: only 121 bits (vs 128) on Blockstream Jade using dice rolls?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Backing up and recovering wallet - seed phrases, private keys, extended private keys, eh???

r/BitcoinSee Post

Best method of long-term cold storage for life-changing amounts?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Seed phrase crazy odds

r/BitcoinSee Post

Is there a way to check why a BIP was rejected ?

r/BitcoinSee Post

BIP39 misalignment? Mnemonic vs. Decimal vs. Binary seeds

r/BitcoinSee Post

Mining ALL remaining bitcoins in less than two weeks (difficult adjustment)?

r/BitcoinSee Post

How to make a new wallet address with my own selected BIP39 words

r/BitcoinSee Post

Import private keys from BIP39 paper wallet with passphrase

r/BitcoinSee Post

12 word BIP 39 >> Hardware Wallet - What are the options?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Electrum seed vs BIP39

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I made a novel that you can hide your seed phrase in.

r/BitcoinSee Post

Securing bitcoin with BIP85

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Malware and scams I should be on the lookout for

r/BitcoinSee Post

What happens if Bitcoin price gets high enough, such that it becomes necessary to go ahead and take it to the 9th decimal place? Can that be done w/ backward compatible SF, or is a HF req'd? Can someone with knowledge detail the process? Can't seem to find answers on this researching around...

r/BitcoinSee Post

BIP39 writing prompt (for mnemonic retention)

r/BitcoinSee Post

how to manually encrypt your BIP39 seedphrase with an additional cipher?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Can the BitBox02 show a wrong seedphrase (BIP 39 wordlist)?

r/BitcoinSee Post

We want clean up - a vent

r/BitcoinSee Post

What if they planted a bug into BIP 382, which makes it possible to increase block rewards?

r/BitcoinSee Post

How secure is BIP39?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Urgent Help Needed for BRD Wallet Bitcoin Recovery

r/BitcoinSee Post

Enhancing Bitcoin Security: A BIP39-Compatible Vernam Encryption Approach for Safeguarding Recovery Phrases

r/BitcoinSee Post

SeedQr Printer?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Stacking has crept up on me and now I need to upgrade my storage

r/BitcoinSee Post

Any open source, encryption based, 3/5 multi factor wallet already available? If not, can this be developed?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Is it a security risk if your wallet’s extended fingerprint (xfp) has been exposed?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Secret word in your BIP phrase.

r/BitcoinSee Post

FINCEN MegaThread | Do Not Give Them Your Silent Consent | Remember Remember The 5th of November | Support Bitcoin Privacy

r/BitcoinSee Post

Thoughts on BIP 324 and the increased anonymity of using bitcoin.

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Thoughts on BIP 324?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Why Bitcoin needs block filters

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ELI5 - What if Ledger or Trezor stops working?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Tutorial: How to use normal (non Casino-grade) dice to generate a seedphrase

r/BitcoinSee Post

Passphrases & Multisig

r/BitcoinSee Post

Should BIP39 passphrases include the use of spaces?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Limiting attempts to restore a wallet?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Bitcoin Is About To Become More Secure With BIP324

r/BitcoinSee Post

BIP39 vs Seed phrase

r/BitcoinSee Post

This page offers a comprehensive overview of BIP-329, proposed by Craig Raw, creator of Sparrow Wallet. You'll find information about the current status and adoption progress, highlighting the significance of this proposal.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Coinplate has a BIP39 seed phrase recovery tool.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Walk down the memory lane: Blocksize wars and the Bitcoin XT controversy

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How Much a Spot Bitcoin ETF Can Affect The Price - The Bad Version

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Can one secret phrase (eventually) access any wallet?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Do you know that you don't need hardware wallets for cold storage?

r/BitcoinSee Post

What is a Bitcoin Sidechain?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Secure seed phrase generator

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

I made a descriptive post of every item that you can purchase using candies from Coingecko so you do not have to look

r/BitcoinSee Post

If you haven’t heard yet…

r/BitcoinSee Post

How CTV (BIP 119) Could Create Channel Factories for Casual Users

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If I shouldn't do this, help me understand why

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

BIP-300 biff: Debate reignites over years-old Bitcoin Drivechain proposal

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BIP-300 biff: Debate reignites over years-old Bitcoin Drivechain proposal

r/BitcoinSee Post

Ian Coleman BIP39 Tool

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The WW2 German Enigma cipher machine has 158,962,555,217,826,360,000 different possibilities (nearly 159 quintillion). The BIP39 seed phrase word list contains 2,048 words, so a 12-word crypto seed phrase has about 2 to the power of 132 possible combinations. That’s 2 with 132 zeroes after it.

r/BitcoinSee Post

"NO" | Rejecting BIP300 Drivechains | Featuring Saifedean Ammous | Bitcoin Standard Author

r/BitcoinSee Post

"NO" | By Saifedean Ammous | Two Open Letters Rejecting BIP300 Drivechains | Voiced by FEEeACH

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How are BIP-39 word lists licensed?

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Why Blockonomics endorses DriveChains (BIP300-301)

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Nested & Native segwit python help

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Nested & Native segwit python help

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Nested & native segweit python codes hepl

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Drivechains, BIP300, BIP301

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How can a cryptocurrency be recovered?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

🔴LIVE | BIP 300 Debate | Drivechain Softfork Dynamics | @BITC0IN

r/BitcoinSee Post

🔴LIVE | BIP 300 Debate | Drivechain Softfork Dynamics | @BITC0IN

r/BitcoinSee Post

Stumbled on BIP-300: a potential game-changer or just buzz?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

There are 2048 possible words that comprise your seed phrase and each of these corresponds to a number in the BIP39 list. Reminder that it’s possible to convert the phrase to numbers for seed storage.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Bitcoin Drivechain Proposal (BIP300) Debate

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Holding crypto is not likely to get any more convenient, and it is an inherent problem of self-costody.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

COLD STORAGE: Comparing the Best Cold Storage Wallets for 2023

r/BitcoinSee Post

Cross wallet recovery

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Yesterday was my first time encountering the word 'Satoshi' in a seed phrase. Did you know it was in the BIP39 word list?

r/BitcoinSee Post

What's your self-custody strategy? Do you keep a backup hardware wallet on hand?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Do not use `bx seed`

r/BitcoinSee Post

BIP300/301 and Drivechain talk with Paul Sztorc and Austin E. Alexander

r/BitcoinSee Post

PSA: Severe Libbitcoin Vulnerability. If you used the "bx seed" command to create seeds/private keys, Immediately move related funds to a different secure address.

r/BitcoinSee Post

BIP 32 software wallet?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

In theory, instead of creating a new wallet and memorising the seed, can I just choose words that are easy to remember and generate a wallet from that?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The Best Hardware Wallets

r/BitcoinSee Post

Is worth buying a hardware wallet?

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Initial Seed

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Importing BIP-84 key in Electrum giving wrong address

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What is a BIP-39 seed phrase -- a few tips for handling your seed words safely

r/BitcoinSee Post

What is a BIP-39 seed phrase -- a few tips for handling your seed words safely

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BIP39 words

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BIP 33 explained

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

BIP 33 explained

r/BitcoinSee Post

Keeping KYC & Non-KYC utxos in the same Multi-Sig wallet: will there be a way of these utxos being linked?

Mentions

woth a cold wallet you are able to interact with your btc without your private key touching the internet. thats the safest way to handle btc right now. BIP39 and its seedphrase has nothing to do with coldwallets ditectly.

Mentions:#BIP

No.. its BIP 39 standard how you create a wallet noadays. You can do it with a dice if you want or let your wallet create it. its basically your master key to recover your wallet at any time.

Mentions:#BIP

>Have Exodus and CB Wallets Both are bad choices. Consider using Bitcoin only (less code, less chance of a bug) and fully open source (exodus isn't). >Is the seed and keys the same? Sort of. The keys are generated from the seed words. >Do you write them down and save the same as your seed? No. Having seed words is enough. >Is having your seed the same or good enough? Better. That's why we're now using usually BIP39 seed words.

Mentions:#BIP

Hashrate. Adoption. Nodes. Name recognition. If another crypto solves any of the known issues or has a great breakthrough, it gets adapted and merged into the Bitcoin core via BIP.

Mentions:#BIP

Assuming arguendo he wins, which he won't, he can't stop developers from developing Bitcoin because it is open source and the miners ultimately choose which BIP to incorporate.

Mentions:#BIP

So you’re asking several questions here. The short answer is that there’s 2^160 possible bitcoin addresses. And in the most simplistic form, your private key can generate 2^31 (over 2 billion) addresses, but has the potential to produce even more. The probability of two users generating the same address is 1 out of 1,461,501,637,330,902,918,203,684,832,716,283,019,655,932,542,976. The longer rationale from what you’re experiencing with your hardware wallet is that bitcoin wallets use a predictable pattern to generate addresses. From concepts introduced in BIP 32 and BIP 44, there’s a predictable and repeatable method of generating addresses from either a private key or an xpub. Each private key can generate 2^31 (roughly 2.1 billion) child keys, each becoming an address. But the neat trick is that each child key can produce their own 2.1 billion child keys themselves, and so on and so on. So there’s a practically infinite number of addresses for you to use, and all your hardware wallets follow the same indexing standard. So your wallet app (Green, presumably) generates an address, checks to see if it’s been used, if it has, it’ll give you the next address in the index. It’s pretty common I think that wallets will try their best to give an address with no other bitcoin in it. You can hit the refresh button to get a new one, that’ll just be the next address in the index. if you refresh 5 times, you’ll go five slots down the list of your possible addresses. If you use two wallet apps (green and sparrow as examples) it’s possible that one of them hasn’t done a recent check of addresses to see if they already contain bitcoin. I’ve also noticed under the right conditions, the Green app doesn’t always generate a truly new address. Not often, and probably just a minor software bug, like it hasn’t refreshed its current data state lately or the screen itself is not reloaded and showing the last time I generated an address. Either way, the warning that you’re reusing an address is just an opportunity to generate a new one. Generating the same address twice is more of a privacy issue (linking two transactions to the same wallet) than it is a risk of address collision.

Mentions:#BIP

There was some kind of JavaScript issue which led to a reduced quality of random numbers when BTC addresses were created on certain browsers between 2011-2015. https://www.unciphered.com/blog/randstorm-you-cant-patch-a-house-of-cards At some point in that era Blockchain.info strongly encouraged their users to move their funds to a newly generated, more cryptographically sound, wallet. I still have control of an address created through them on December 2013, with no unauthorized activity ever occurring. Re: “Some hot wallet providers generate new public address for new receive transactions…”, my Dec 2013 wallet referenced above is non-deterministic, so maybe Blockchain.info didn’t implement BIP32 yet. If yours is similar, key relationships may simply not exist for you to dig into.

Mentions:#BTC#BIP

Yeah. Read this. Bitcoin transactions are public information. Addresses should not be re-used for better privacy. Ledger Live automatically generates new addresses using standards (BIP32/BIP39/BIP44) and keeps track of your previous ones. Previous addresses do remain valid, but they don't offer an optimal level of privacy

Mentions:#BIP

Just one more thing man, would you recommend engraving only the BIP39 codes instead of the seed phrase words or directly engrave the key itself? I tend to believe that BIP39 for passphrase is most secure?!

Mentions:#BIP

Passphrases are a no go. Regular seeds can be figured out if your writing is terrible based on BIP 39. Passphrases can literally be anything. Talk to the guys at unchained who literally deal with this all the time. So many people have lost their keys forever because of passcodes.

Mentions:#BIP

OP, I see you already have received plenty of feedback, some of which is well-informed, and other advice that is not doing you favors. If you care about maintaining (i.e. not losing) your crypto, you need a hard wallet from a reputable vendor, period. I own Trezor (Bitcoin-only firmware) and Bitbox02 (Bitcoin-only version). I like both. Coldcard is also reputable. If you're holding a lot of differnet tokens, then you'll need to check the compatibility matrix for wallets like Trezor or Ledger. Probably the latter supports the most tokens, though I cannot vouch for them because I do not use a Ledger wallet. > My seeds are written down, laminated and put away. Currently thinking to put them in a house safe or bank safe. Good idea. My seeds are written on paper and stored in a physically secure manner in multiple locations. > The seeds are additionally in a txt-file that is on an flash drive that will only see a connection to cleaned offline laptops. This is very bad. If you put your seed into a text file on a flash drive, then it means you've typed your seed out on a computer or phone keyboard. This is a very reliable way to lose everything. *Never*, ever type your seed on any keyboard. Only input your seed into your hardware wallet (e.g. Trezor, Bitbox02) when necessary. There are too many creative ways for exfiltration to occur, even with wifi and data turned off, if you type a seed on a keyboard. Do not do it, ever. I'd consider your current seed "suspect" and (if it were me) I'd generate a new wallet using a hardware wallet, then plan to migrate to it. You should also look into BIP-39 passphrase as a way to further secure your wallet (and to provide some mitigation if somehow your seed on paper is discovered by a bad actor). I see people on this thread saying, "yeah, your home-rolled solution is good enough, no worries". On the other hand, I am explaining how to do this is security is of utmost importance to you, and it would be life-altering to lose what is in your wallet. Entirely up to you on how to proceed.

Mentions:#OP#BIP

Hardware wallets do 2 things: - Allow you to send from your cold storage securely - Allow you to create a recovery seed in a secure manner. If you just have a recovery seed and no hardware wallet, when you want to send coin from that seed you would need to enter it into a wallet. That is a security risk. With a hardware wallet you can send that coin securely. I'm from the days of paper wallets and I had a cold storage paper BIP38 wallet for many years. It was very stressful having to sweep that wallet when I wanted to move funds. Hardware wallets are the way to go. I recommend Trezor One as it's the most scrutinized open source wallet out there.

Mentions:#BIP

I have less than 1k. I installed Sparrow Wallet on Tails and generated a BIP39 seed completely offline (Electrum has another seed standard). If I buy a HW can I restore the seeds in it or should I generate a new see?

Mentions:#BIP

tldr; Bitcoin developers are proposing to reintroduce the 'OP_CAT' function, which was removed by Satoshi Nakamoto in 2010 due to security concerns. The new Bitcoin Improvement Proposal (BIP) aims to restore this early functionality to enhance Bitcoin's capabilities, potentially enabling the creation of layer-2 networks, decentralized exchanges, and file hosting. The proposal is still in discussion and has not been formally assigned a BIP number. It faces philosophical opposition from some in the Bitcoin community who prefer to maintain the network's original focus on being a store of value and a peer-to-peer payment system. *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.

Mentions:#OP#BIP#DYOR

No, if you already have coins on either SLIP39 or BIP39 you would need to move on chain to transfer your coins to your new wallet. To spend coins to buy something, is the same from either.

Mentions:#BIP

It existed in the wild and after enough time had passed it had enough blocks and block history to establish itself and maintain the chain. I'm not sure about whether or not the main chain has/was ever successfully attacked or hindered but the history of the chain and the BIP's are verifiable and permanently preserved for anyone who cares to research them. It's truly remarkably honest in a world full of dishonesty and dishonest people. For me it is without a doubt the most transparent and honest thing man has ever created. I think it's fair to say that it took a lot of hard work but also luck because without luck it would have been relatively easy to corrupt the chain especially when considering nation states and computational capacity around the time of Bitcoins inception.

Mentions:#BIP

[Sharded Secret Key Reconstruction (SSKR)](https://developer.blockchaincommons.com/sskr/) is an interoperable standard the is an improvement on SLIP-39. One of the main improvements is that SSKR can do a BIP39 <-> SSKR roundtrip which SLIP-39 cannot do. This is important. If splitting a BIP-39 seed I suggest using SSKR rather than SLIP-39. Each share can [stamped on steel washers](https://blockmit.com/english/guides/diy/make-cold-wallet-washers/) then stored in several secure locations. [Steel tags](https://github.com/BlockchainCommons/crypto-commons/blob/master/Docs/sskr-cold-storage.md) are an option too. Here's a handy app for securely generating the shares on an air gapped Ledger device: [https://github.com/aido/app-seed-tool](https://github.com/aido/app-seed-tool)

Mentions:#BIP

SLIP39 is only supported by TrezorT and the older model Keystone wallet. It has a smaller wordlist, so longer shards (up to 33 words). By design SLIP39 is not interchangeable with BIP39, so if you already have coins on an existing BIP39 wallet you would need to move them on chain to SLIP39. This limitation exists as a security assumption with SLIP39 is that you need N of M threshold shards to spend, and if there were an undestroyed BIP39 mnemonic out there, then your funds could be spent without your control.

Mentions:#BIP

There are multiple options 1. Keep them on separate addresses, label your utxos/addresses to keep track of which is which 2. Use multiple accounts in the same wallet (RECOMMENDED). So, m/84'/0'/0' (Account 0) is KYC, m/84'/0'/1' (Account 1) is non-KYC. You can manage them both on your ColdCard inside the same wallet (by providing an Account number in Address Explorer, for signing transactions, exporting files...). You can keep using the same wallet file in Sparrow, with separate tabs for each account. 3. Create different wallets on the same seed using a passphrase. 4. Use [BIP-85](https://coldcard.com/docs/bip85/) to generate separate seeds from a master parent (so you don't have to manually backup these seeds, you can recreate them anytime using your master seed and index number.

Mentions:#BIP

You need keys to own bitcoin, a wallet gives you keys (BIP39 seed phrase). Someone earlier said when you complete the purchase on exchange you own bitcoin, this is not true, you only own bitcoin to your keys.

Mentions:#BIP

The BIP39 word list is on the internet. Do not post your seed words on the internet.

Mentions:#BIP

I thought about this more and I didn‘t realize that at first: The question of „is the signature using my passphrase?“ is very easily verfiable. Meaning, if it weren‘t using the passphrase in general, people would know. If it were only my device that isn‘t using the passphrase then my device would‘ve been tampered with which I find far fetched but I guess possible. If I buy a coldcard device now and enter my seed and passphrase in there, it should theoretically come out to be the same keys. That way I could verify if my ledger is using the correct keys for signatures. I‘d first need to check if the BIP39 implementations are the same though. I‘m not worried about the keys leaking. Especially because I only use temporary passphrases too. CCC didn‘t manage to break the Ledger either iirc.

Mentions:#BIP#CCC

> This is a genuine question and I am genuinely interested but no matter how often it is asked, noone ever provides a credible answer. The vast majority here in this subreddit have no idea about this space. There is an entire industry working on bitcoin products and it's growing each year. > So what is being created in the bitcoin space that is going to facilitate mass adoption? Well part of that depends on what your vision of adoption is. Your vision may not be what my vision is, my vision is very broad as it can go many ways. (And in many ways, bitcoin adoption is getting to "mass adoption" levels. How do you even define that? At this point it's the #10 assets class by marketcap in the world and growing. That's pretty incredible) But there have been many things going back a few years: Segwit, BIP 39, Lightning, Fedimints, ETF, etc. Not all are perfect, not all will work. But they are being worked on. There are many companies working on other products as well such as Strike. I would recommend listening to the Scaling Bitcoin podcast on What Bitcoin Did with Lyn Alden which goes over some of these ideas along with the issues with them. The biggest hinderance today with mass adoption, in my opinion, is taxes. If there is some tax law that says "Purchases under $200 are excempt from capital gains taxes with bitcoin" that would be a major help and there are Senators who are proposing such laws. I'll also say that buying and holding bitcoin IS adoption. Bitcoin is unique in that unlike our currency fiat system where the value goes down over time, bitcoin doesn't have the inflation issue. So buying and holding is adoption. And in that sense, the ETF is a huge push to mass adoption as it gives you the option to expose yourself to this monetary system without some of the risks of self custody along with holding in a tax advantaged account. One thing is - the idea that every single transaction (such as you buying a cup of coffee) will be posted on the base layer of bitcoin is pretty much not going to happen. Many of the products will use some type of centralization/trust but be built on the backbone of a decentralized monetary network. One example is within Coinbase you can send to other Coinbase users for free. This is just like a wire transfer from Bank to Bank. Currently our fiat system is this but built on the backbone of a centralized monetary network.

Mentions:#BIP#ETF

Satoshi did not describe a full featured SPV wallet in the whitepaper. He only outlined a method to verify that a known transaction was included in a block. For a lightweight wallet, we need a method to retrieve each transaction belonging to that wallet. This need led to the introduction of bloom filters by BIP 37 (*Mike Hearn, Matt Corallo*). Before that, an SPV wallet had to download every full block to scan for its wallet addresses, resulting in minimal user experience benefits over a full client (the same slow synchronization to the network, etc). However, it was later discovered that BIP 37 has serious [privacy issues](https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/BIP37_privacy_problems). The next milestone in lightweight clients is Neutrino, which is actually in practical use. You can run LND as a Neutrino node, and it's a fully-featured wallet with Lightning Network support. Altough, there are still significant user experience benefits in using Electrum servers over Neutrino for a wallet, as highlighted in this [Electrum issue](https://github.com/spesmilo/electrum/issues/5912#issuecomment-691042112). This is why Neutrino wallets have not gained widespread usage.

Mentions:#BIP

Because every altcoin is a rejected BIP. They are broken rejects. Compromised ethos + security. There is only Bitcoin and then the slew of butthurt crybaby Because their shitty code didn't make the cut.

Mentions:#BIP

Titanium for the most corrosion and heat resistance. Stamp the BIP39 digits into two Ti sheets and store them in different geographical locations. There's kits on eBay.

Mentions:#BIP

its "sort", word 1661 on BIP39 wordlist.

Mentions:#BIP

Install Sparrow Wallet on a computer or Blue Wallet on mobile, click on import wallet, write out the 12 or 24 words you have, separated by space. Words are from the official BIP-39 wordlist which you can find on GitHub. Pretty much every wallet accepts the standard BIP-39 format.  Next step is to decide what you want to do with these coins. Do you want to hold it or sell it? Do not share these words with anyone. Do not input them anywhere online. Do not take pictures of it. Do not store them in the cloud. Anyone who sees your words can take all your coins. 

Mentions:#BIP

Is “soar” a BIP39 word? And if so, has anyone mentioned the possibility that the word in question is “soar”? If not, someone should recommended trying the word “soar” assuming “soar” has not already been mentioned. Is it “soar”?

Mentions:#BIP

Words from the BIP39 wordlist that start with SO (assuming they are the first 2 letters) soap sock soda soft song soon sort soul soup

Mentions:#BIP#SO

Since the BIP-39 word list is finite, 2048 words, it should be easy to compare those four letters to the list. This is a good example of why writing in block letters is the only way to be certain.

Mentions:#BIP

Look up the BIP39 word list and go from there. From that alone you can rule out soar which seems to be a popular answer. Good luck!

Mentions:#BIP

STOP SAYING “soar”!!!! “soar” IS NOT PART OF THE BIP LIST!!!!!

A 24-word BIP39 mnemonic is made from 24 x 11-bit bitstrings. There are 2048 words in the list, 2^11 is 2048, so an 11-bit bitstring can be interpreted as a number form 0-2047 12 x 11 = 264 and BIP39 only uses 256 random bits. The other 8 bits are made by hashing the 256 bits, then using the first 8 bits of the hash as the last 8 bits of the 264 These extra 8 bits are used as a checksum The 24th word is made from the last 3 bits of the random and the 8 bit checksum. This means that a mnemonic can usually nor be made from 24 of the same word. There are 11 words in the 2048-word list where the checksum happens to line up so that 24 of the same word makes a mnemonic with a valid checksum. The first of these is bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon bacon The full list is *bacon flag gas great slice solution summer they trade trap zebra*

Mentions:#BIP

this guy BIP39s

Mentions:#BIP

Soar is not a BIP39 word

Mentions:#BIP

>According to the BIP list, if we consider "s" to be the first letter, and assuming that op did reduce the all seed phrases to four letters, there are 48 seed phrases starting with "s" and four letters in length: What you are talking about is called "words" not "seed phrases". A seed phrase is 12 to 24 words long and refers to around 4 billion of belonging keypairs and adresses.

Mentions:#BIP

[https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039/english.txt](https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039/english.txt) According to the BIP list, if we consider "s" to be the first letter, and assuming that op did reduce the all seed phrases to four letters, there are X48 seed phrases starting with "s" and four letters in length: 1. safe 2. sail 3. salt 4. same 5. sand 6. save 7. scan 8. seat 9. seed 10. seek 11. sell 12. shed 13. ship 14. shoe 15. shop 16. sick 17. side 18. sign 19. silk 20. sing 21. size 22. skin 23. slab 24. slam 25. slim 26. slot 27. slow 28. snap 29. snow 30. soap 31. sock 32. soda 33. soft 34. song 35. soon 36. sort 37. soul 38. soup 39. spin 40. spot 41. stay 42. stem 43. step 44. such 45. suit 46. sure 47. swap 48. swim

Mentions:#BIP

try the BIP-39 list https://www.blockplate.com/pages/bip-39-wordlist good luck mate!

Mentions:#BIP

If we could see more of your handwriting it works help - not the rest of your BIP39 though ofc.

Mentions:#BIP

soar is not part of BIP39 words

Mentions:#BIP

Assuming the first 2 letters are "SO", here are the possible BIP39 words with 4 letters. soap sock soda soft song soon sort soul soup

Mentions:#SO#BIP

> My thinking was to use the Ian Coleman "IC" site for its strengths and choose a different language as any hacker getting it from the USA would likely try English Why is English a problem? Are you thinking of dictionary attacks? I don't believe that applies here. Dictionary attacks work with *passwords* because people are not very random with their choice of passwords and like to make short ones based on a word or two. Key word: "choice". Passwords people choose tend to be low-entropy, because people are bad at randomness. However, here you are letting an RNG generate 128–256 bits of entropy. The mnemonic is nothing but an encoding of that entropy. It doesn't make it any easier to guess. But it *does* make it easier for you to handle as a human. That is, *if* you use the mnemonic, as opposed to just copying master keys or whatever. > derivation 84 (I was just saying 32 because earlier because it was the standard and messing it with is a good way to make your coins unrecoverable) thru experimenting I realized only 84 will produce bc1 addresses, which I think is best going into the future. BIP 84 is the standard that specifies the derivation path for P2WPKH (pay-to-witness-public-key-hash) wallets, P2WPKH being the script type that has "bc1q" addresses associated with it. So it makes sense you get those only if you choose BIP 84. Other choices there, other than BIP 32, correspond to other script types. One that is missing on that page is BIP 86, which is for P2TR (pay-to-Taproot) scripts, which have "bc1p" addresses. But then, Electrum doesn't yet support P2TR wallets. > 1. ... > 2. ... > 3. ... I'm not sure I understand what this is about. Were these different things you tried? Did you create multiple wallets using these different steps? Or something else? > if I could get the QR to work that would be great, but getting the laptop camera to snap a picture in a mirrror didnt work. QR codes generally cannot be scanned in mirror image, as they are not designed to make such a distinction apparent to a scanner. A mirrored QR code looks superficially like a non-mirrored one turned a different way, but things are in the wrong places. If you really need to have a device scan a QR code from its own screen, you need to use an even number of mirrors, so the image goes back non-mirrored. However... > However next to the camera button there was the choice to "Read from file". I snapped a screenshot (.png) and went to the .png file and entered it. It took a few seconds but it seemed to load/accept it Yes, this is a lot easier. But is even that really necessary? Does Tails prevent you doing a simple copy-and-paste of the field, instead of going through all that rigamarole? I'm not familiar with use of Tails, so I don't actually know. But surely there is an easier way than what you're trying to do. > enter 12 more custom words (this is another reason im using IC, I get a good set of 12 more words This is your passphrase, then. That's what the "extend with custom words" option in Electrum is referring to. > then the PassPhrase There is no "then" at this point. You have already entered your second 12-word phrase as the passphrase. There is no option to add anything more. If you want to enter 24 words in Electrum (which is of dubious benefit, as Bitcoin keys, being ECC, only have ~128 bits of security, the same as the entropy you get through a 12-word mnemonic), then just generate a 24-word mnemonic, which Electrum will accept as a BIP 39 mnemonic. It's only Electrum mnemonics that must be 12 words. > HERE IS the main reason Im trying to use the IC -as long as it doesn't make my wallet unrecoverable- it generates a 100 digit passphrase, the longest allowable, in my brain I hope you have a savant-level memory, because there is no way *I* would be able to remember something like that. And there is no way I can recommend it to anyone, including you. Word of advice: unless you have superb discipline, don't try to get fancy with your security measures. A lot more people lose their bitcoin by losing or forgetting all the details of what they did than by actually having it stolen.

There should be 2048/16 (=128) of these "bacon seeds". There are 2048 BIP39 words and 1/16th of them will be able to use the same final word with a valid checksum. So OP is suggesting to not really use the seed words for security and just rely on the passphrase as a traditional password for the wallet. Interesting. A 12 word seed phrase has 128 bits of entropy, so a passphrase with 128 bits of entropy should provide equal security as a 12 word seed phrase.

Mentions:#BIP#OP

A BIP39 seed phrase is 12 or 24 words including a checksum. There are several valid seed phrases using the same word repeating. bacon bacon bacon (24 bacons) is one of those valid seeds. "the bacon seed." bacon.

Mentions:#BIP

You are right. But let's analyze the risks. If you don't trust that your HW has a correct random number generator you can use dice to generate words and some open source BIP39 commands on an offline PC for the checksum word. And then of course scramble-format the hard drive. Any other risks left?

Mentions:#BIP#PC

>but the standard is BIP 39, and that is widely portable Not quite. BIP39 includes lots of (optional) things that are not at all widely supported by existing wallet software, e.g. passprhase (aka seed extension). Not even the word list is that "standard"

Mentions:#BIP

Maybe you didn't read the BIP > Unanimously Discourage for implementation

Mentions:#BIP

Fair enough, not adopted by Bitcoin core, but a standard that has officially been published as a BIP. Point being it isn't a proprietary thing.

Mentions:#BIP

The passphrase actually "change" your seed. The seed is used as entropy to then generate your private keys. The process is described here: [https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039.mediawiki](https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039.mediawiki) &#x200B; So what you need is a software or (better) a hardware signer compatible with BIP39. That would be pretty much all of them. Just import your seed phrase, and find the option to add the passphrase and you are all set. Also as a note: your 12 or 24 words are a different wallet (different private and public keys) altogether from the same mnemonics with passphrase.

Mentions:#BIP

This. Your last sentence is what i have been unable to get reddit to understand , though im sure the breakdown is on my end. My thinking was to use the Ian Coleman "IC" site for its strengths and choose; a different language as any hacker getting it from the USA would likely try English tick the B39 passphrase derivation 84 (I was just saying 32 because earlier because it was the standard and messing it with is a good way to make your coins unrecoverable) thru experimenting I realized only 84 will produce bc1 addresses, which I think is best going into the future. Thats the easy part, but how to enter it into Electrum and get the "unlimited" addresses. The IC site has the ability to show QR if you roll over the text addresses. 1. Open Create Wallet in Electrum, (if the next choice was Import Private Keys that would be great, but I couldn't get the QR window to except the QR code from the IC website and i sure as h--- am not going to trust myself to type it in. 2. Open Create Wallet in Electrum, Standard Wallet, Use a Master Key - stumped...Master Key has both Public and Private Keys yes. IC site doesn't make it clear. 3. Open Create Wallet in Electrum, Standard Wallet, I have a seed, switch SEED TYPE from Electrum (drop down) to BIP39, enter 12 words, scroll down to tick box "Extend seed with custom words" (which always concerned me because people could add crazy words not in the B39 wordlist, they probably think it is the dictionary, 2048 seems small) then ENTER, enter 12 more custom words (this is another reason im using IC, I get a good set of 12 more words, hit enter retype your first 12, then your 2nd 12, enter, then the PassPhrase (HERE IS the main reason Im trying to use the IC -as long as it doesn't make my wallet unrecoverable- it generates a 100 digit passphrase, the longest allowable, in my brain -takes the longest to brute force, cut and past that in because I will be offline and the laptop won't be ever going back on (spare laptop). I really haven't decided whether to do a paper or thumb drive backup of the 24 seeds, passphrase and printouts of the MasterKey and Private Key, probably both in seperate locations. So what I can't tell is if its going to keep supplying address like I hope it will. An aside, I wish there was a wallet that used a mixed language wordlist, making it say 10x larger, but maybe 2048 is enough.

Complicated. For the full answer, read the SegWit BIP a couple of times The witness performs the same role as the script in a P2SH legacy txinput scriptSig, but is laid out as a stack instead of a start-to-finish script. The variables are at the top of the stack, and the last stack element is the script I'm not spending time looking at your image. You can paste the text of your witness, or if it's a real transaction, the txID

Mentions:#BIP

> the standard is BIP 39 Not entirely. A deterministic wallet using BIP39 recovery mnemonic is created by passing the BIP39 seed into BIP32 BIP32 is a flexible standard, with several common derivation paths and virtually unlimited custom derivation paths, not designed to be portable Also, BIP39 entropy, standard word list, and checksum are optional. A BIP39 seed can be created by entering an arbitrary phrase into the HMAC step. It is possible to use the BIP39 recovery option in Electrum to enter any phrase and create a wallet

Mentions:#BIP

True, but the standard is BIP 39, and that is widely portable. There are probably a small number that use something else. Most notable is Electrum, that generates phrases by its own standard, which most wallets do not support (but there are a few that do). However, Electrum does support *importing* BIP 39 phrases.

Mentions:#BIP

A hardware wallet does still need software to access it. But as far as the company disappearing, as long as it follows standards like BIP 39 (for the mnemonic phrase) and one of the ones for the derivation path for whichever address type you're using (e.g. BIP 44 for legacy, BIP 84 for native segwit, etc.), then even if you're unable to access the hardware wallet in the future, you can still access the funds just by importing the mnemonic phrase into some other wallet, because that is all the information any wallet needs to generate all of your keys and addresses. That's the wonderful thing about deterministic wallets.

Mentions:#BIP

> If Im a BTC only hodler shouldn't i leave the derivation on BIP32 and not the default BIP44? If I understand that tool correctly (you're talking about the "Mnemonic Code Converter"?), BIP 32 just means you enter your own derivation path instead of one of the standard ones. But if you do that, and you later want to import the mnemonic, then you have to get the wallet you're using to use the same derivation path. Why make trouble for yourself this way when you can just use a perfectly fine standard? Also, I hope you understand the purpose of BIP 39, the subject of the tool you're using. It is to put the entropy into a form easier for humans to understand and handle, i.e. 12–24-word mnemonics. If you don't want to mess with those, maybe this isn't the tool to use. Just a thought. OTOH, if you're fine with it, why not just import the mnemonic into your wallet? Then you will get as many of the addresses that can be derived from it as you want, which is one of the great benefits of deterministic wallets.

Mentions:#BTC#BIP

ERC is short for Ethereum Request for Comment - basically the EIP or BIP (Ethereum / Bitcoin Improvement Proposals) equivalent, just for smart contract standards. Proposals like this are not only made before launch - it's an ongoing development process, that continues until today. So yeah, actually Ethereum was designed without the ERC-20 in mind. As a BTC maxi in disguise I don't even want to defend it.

Mentions:#BIP#BTC

I know not truly unlimited, but for my short lifespan I consider it to be. The site does say it generates verifiable mnemonics, not that I believe every website I believe but it is open source and looked at quite critically. Not sure what can be pointed to seed and addresses wise as to why it is inferior in my use case of 1. Electrum on Tails (on a dedicated older offline laptop with wifi card removed) 2. Not wanting the retraint of the way Electrum handles BIP39, instead of a cold wallet. Otherwise I'd just do the whole thing on Electrum of course. Are you of the opinion that BIP39 is not worth the tradeoff, I've heard that, stay with Bip38 passphrase and 24 words and 44 derivation, not a bad choice too.

Mentions:#BIP

Hmm maybe "SECRET" is a BIP32 base64-encoded "master extended key": https://learnmeabitcoin.com/technical/extended-keys Maybe not!

Mentions:#BIP

> Use the "Show 20 more rows" button But didn't you say below you don't want 2Billion in your wallet? I don't want 40 or 400 either. I want it to keep generating after 20. Im guessing thats the difference between a webpage and installed software or maybe when I import it into say a coldcard, then I import it into Electrum or Blue the "watch only" will be able to create as many receive addresses as possible. > Use BIP84 Yes thanks I saw that was the only was to get the bc1 adresses. > It says that because you don't have a mnemonic ok > 2 billion per subchain. You don't want that in your wallet ok

Mentions:#BIP

> If I leave it at the default 20 is that all I get Use the "Show 20 more rows" button > shouldn't i leave the derivation on BIP32 Use BIP84 > when you change it to anything other than BIP44, it says "invalid root key" It says that because you don't have a mnemonic

Mentions:#BIP

BIP39 (the wordlist used for seed phrases) consists of 2048 words. Given a pass phrase of 12 you have 2048\^12 possible combinations that make up the phrase. If you split this seed phrase in half and an attacker gets half the phrase, they only have 2048\^6 combinations to brute force the remainder of the key. The proper way to do it is what I mentioned above as it does not weaken the phrase (the ability to brute force it) when one Multisig key or one share/part of the phrase using Shamirs Secret Sharing (SSS) is stolen. If you spend some time reading about how these work (Multisig and SSS) then you will understand the difference. Some people even [oppose the use of SSS](https://blog.keys.casa/shamirs-secret-sharing-security-shortcomings/).

Mentions:#BIP#SSS

BIP-39 is a standard followed by most, but not all, wallets.

Mentions:#BIP

There are 66 combinations to try if you know that two of the words are swapped. A *human* could do that in less than two hours inputting seed phrases manually into a wallet app. Also, note that BIP-39 specifies a 4-bit checksum that is encoded with the seed phrase. Most of the 66 possibilities are not valid seed phrases and don't even need to be checked thoroughly for coins.

Mentions:#BIP

There are only 66 combinations for two swapped phrases, and chances are they don't all need to be checked thoroughly because BIP-39 has a checksum as part of the phrase.

Mentions:#BIP

Most likely not a manual process - maybe just a trojan/malware/virus which sits in the background and scans all your files/emails for words from the BIP39 list. Any instance of those words results in the file/email being sent to the malicious party for checking.

Mentions:#BIP

The BitBox02 Bitcoin-only edition is a hardware wallet with radically focused firmware dedicated exclusively to Bitcoin. Less code means less attack surface, which further improves your security when storing your Bitcoin. BitBox02 is very similar with the Coldcard Mk3. Both hardware wallets use the ATECC608A secure chip. But unlike the Coldcard, it has a faster 120 MHz microcontroller chip. This makes multisig setups faster and easier to perform. Furthermore, the onboarding process on the BitBox02 is simple and effortless. You can do the initial setup within a couple of minutes, as your encrypted backup gets stored on the SD card. But to increase your security, you can also get your BIP 39 seed phrase from the BitBoxApp. In comparative terms, the BitBox02 is the hardware wallet that: 1. Follows the open source ethos of Trezor; 2. Takes user interface simplicity cues from Ledger; 3. Offers physical security like the Coldcard. 4. Swiss Engineering The BitBoxApp also allows you to run a full Bitcoin node and also features Tor routing. This means that you get more privacy and security for your transactions. Also, the BitBoxApp combines all Bitcoin address types under one menu. This is great for newbies, as they don’t need to differentiate between legacy and bech32. By ticking the “Coin Control” box, you get to manage UTXOs, It’s a user feature which boosts your financial privacy in a way that very few wallets do. Hope this helps 🙂

Mentions:#SD#BIP

You can use the seed phrase you have set up aleady and use the BIP39 passphrase option in the options tab BEFORE you log in with your companion app. You can choose any pasphrase you want. This will create an entirely new wallet though. You can choose for it to prompt you always(asks for passphrase each time you log in) , once (the next log in attempt), or never(which will show you the wallet attached to the seed).

Mentions:#BIP

I try to call it a hardware key. It isn’t perfect but I think it helps people to think of a Ledger or a Trezor as a key, that they use to unlock their wallet. Keychain might be better since it is a different key per blockchain, or may even be more than one key for one blockchain. But key works well for me. It is only one BIP-39 private key that you can view in different ways.

Mentions:#BIP

>Same seed The concept of seed and deterministic wallets was only introduced with BIP32 in 2013.

Mentions:#BIP

Crypto people have a tendency to go for what looks like the most secure option. I guess the people who wrote BIP 39 assumed 256 bits are better. Here is [an article](https://foundationdevices.com/2023/06/make-12-words-the-standard/) with a better explanation than I can provide myself.

Mentions:#BIP

“Seed” and wallet derivation paths (enabling you to derive multiple wallet keys from the same seed) were not thing back in the day. It was just a binary wallet.dat with the private key, generated randomly, and not deterministically from a seed phrase. BIP39 mnemonic phrases were introduced in 2013, while Satoshi disappeared in 2011.

Mentions:#BIP

You don't need to sync the chain, you can simply use [https://github.com/KomodoPlatform/komodo-wallet-desktop/releases](https://github.com/KomodoPlatform/komodo-wallet-desktop/releases), which has POT listed and uses electrum servers. If you import your privkey, you will have access to POT and can send them to CEXs to sell them, eg [https://freiexchange.com](https://freiexchange.com), [https://freixlite.com](https://freixlite.com) or [https://xeggex.com](https://xeggex.com). Komodo Wallet does not support trading POT on native chain, since the code is too old and does not support BIP65.

Mentions:#POT#BIP

BIP39 didn't exist yet back then

Mentions:#BIP

a BIP39 passphrase is a great idea, just make sure its complex enough not to be brute forced (12+ characters long), kept separate from your 12/24 seed phrase. Even if someone finds your seed, they'd have to get the passphrase.

Mentions:#BIP

This might help. https://river.com/learn/terms/d/derivation-path/#:~:text=A%20derivation%20path%20is%20a,a%20part%20of%20BIP%2032.

Mentions:#BIP

Yeah, absolutely. BIP85 child seeds would be even better. 

Mentions:#BIP

I would not recommend doing that. Keep a single seedphrase, and don’t reuse addresses. Fyi, if you really want to keep it seperate in a wallet application, you don’t need to create generate new wallets (with each having its own seed), you can just create new accounts on an existing seed (increasing the index in rhe derivation path). There is also BIP-85 cor creating child seeds out of a master seed. And there are passphrases. And you can combine all of it. But keep it simple. 

Mentions:#BIP

>That part I understand, what I don't understand is how did you create a paper wallet and how did you make transaction step by step Software Savvy: Ditch websites, you needed to download software like Bitcoin Core or Electrum. Randomness is King: Run the software, click "Create New Wallet," and boom! Out pops a string of gibberish called your "private key." This is your Bitcoin lifeblood, treat it like Fort Knox gold. Paper Power: Back then, digital wasn't cool. Print the two QR codes (one for public address, the other for the private key – remember, never share this!) on clean paper. Laser printers were the preferred gunslingers for durability. Sending and receiving – the Bitcoin saloon brawl: Sharing your loot: To receive Bitcoin, flash your public address like a saloon door. People could scan your QR code or manually type it into their software. Easy-peasy. Saddle up for sending: This was where things got dicey. Open your software, pick "Send," and enter the recipient's address (scan their code if you're feeling flashy). Now, the real showdown: specify the amount of Bitcoin you're sending. Signing with your secret six-shooter: Remember that private key? This is where it shines. You either typed the whole thing in (yeehaw, risky!), or used a combo of it and a password. Think of it as your unique branding iron marking the Bitcoin. Bonus tips for surviving the Bitcoin blizzard: Encrypted treasure?: Some software offered BIP38 encryption, adding a password lock on your private key. Think of it as a double-padlock on your gold chest. Multiple stashes: Don't put all your eggs in one basket! Print multiple copies of your paper wallet and store them in secure hideouts. Think bank vaults, not desk drawers. Safety first: Public computers and networks were like dusty, bandit-infested towns. Avoid using them for anything key-related. Remember, Bitcoin was still a rough-and-tumble frontier back then.

Mentions:#QR#BIP

One idea is to generate a seed.... then use a cold card to generate BIP-85 child seeds. Child seeds are number 0, 1, 2, 3 etc. All that's needed is the 'original seed' to recover literally all the child seeds. However knowing a child seed tells you nothing about the 'other' child seeds... or the parent seeds generating the Child seeds to begin with. This way if they lose the child seeds you can always generate them again from the parent seed as long as its kept safe (and recover the associated funds). My recommendation would maybe be this... based on a cold card seed with a passphrase (to generate the parent). Get creative the sky is the limit.

Mentions:#BIP

Make 9 BIP85 seeds, send sats to each. 

Mentions:#BIP

Different BIP85 seeds would be better. 

Mentions:#BIP

[BIP-39](https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039.mediawiki) is a specification that most contemporary wallets follow for creating a *mnemonic sentence*. Some wallets don't strictly follow BIP-39 but even those use a similar method. > This BIP describes the implementation of a mnemonic code or mnemonic sentence -- a group of easy to remember words -- for the generation of deterministic wallets. > It consists of two parts: generating the mnemonic and converting it into a binary seed. This seed can be later used to generate deterministic wallets using BIP-0032 or similar methods. [BIP-32](https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0032.mediawiki) is a specification for deriving a "tree" of private and public key pairs -- more than you'll ever need -- from a single seed (essentially a very, very, very large random number). Most contemporary wallets follow BIP-32. > This document describes hierarchical deterministic wallets (or "HD Wallets"): wallets which can be shared partially or entirely with different systems, each with or without the ability to spend coins. > The specification is intended to set a standard for deterministic wallets that can be interchanged between different clients. Although the wallets described here have many features, not all are required by supporting clients. > The specification consists of two parts. In a first part, a system for deriving a tree of keypairs from a single seed is presented. The second part demonstrates how to build a wallet structure on top of such a tree. With a basic understanding of BIP-32 and BIP-39 you should be able to see why the seed phrases DON'T have to be recorded anywhere to be used. They should ONLY be stored offline, to allow their owner to recover the private and public keys (i.e. the wallet) if needed.

Mentions:#BIP#DON

>You : "Actually you are about to discover one fascinating aspect about bitcoin , since jan 2009, no one successfully hacked it ! r/confidentlyincorrect [CVE-2010-5139: Bitcoin Value Overflow](https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Value_overflow_incident) and [CVE-2013-3220: Bitcoin’s Migration From BerkeleyDB to LevelDB](https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/BIP_0050) were exploited in blocks 74638 and 225430 respectively (though one exploit was done by a non-malicious actor).

Mentions:#BIP

> The goal being to have a whole financial ecosystem on Bitcoin without requiring any changes. Even drivechains from BIP 300/301 won't be needed. Or merge mining as is the case with Rootstock sidechain. Or the hybrid system Stacks is using. Bitcoin remains untouched, everything gets built around it theough rollups, with confirmations on Bitcoin mainchain. i like. thanks for the video. (longer beard = even better code, think about it :P)

Mentions:#BIP
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