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VTI

Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund ETF Shares

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Reddit Posts

r/investingSee Post

What to do next? I am running out of ideas

r/investingSee Post

Problem with Redundancy/ Overlap

r/investingSee Post

Should I invest now or wait?

r/investingSee Post

23 F advice on my long term portfolio: VTI/QQQM/Costco

r/investingSee Post

Roth IRA investnent recommendation

r/investingSee Post

Is it ok to never have bonds if you start investing early?

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Reminder: Just invest in VTI/VOO

r/investingSee Post

Backdoor vs more investment choices

r/stocksSee Post

How are u guys doing?

r/StockMarketSee Post

HELP ON MUTUAL FUNDS

r/RobinHoodSee Post

Let's go! For most, the best investment route is to just purchase a S&P500 index fund/ETF and hold on (*while adding to it often and extra when markets are in a down-cycle). Vanguard's VOO and VFINX have low expense ratios % and are great choices! VTI / VTSMX are also good (total market) options.

r/smallstreetbetsSee Post

Let's go! For most, the best investment route is to just purchase a S&P500 index fund/ETF and hold on (*while adding to it often and extra when markets are in a down-cycle). Vanguard's VOO and VFINX have low expense ratios % and are great choices! VTI / VTSMX are also good (total market) options.

r/WallStreetbetsELITESee Post

Let's go! For most, the best investment route is to just purchase a S&P500 index fund/ETF and hold on (*while adding to it often and extra when markets are in a down-cycle). Vanguard's VOO and VFINX have low expense ratios % and are great choices! VTI / VTSMX are also good (total market) options.

r/investingSee Post

Capital loss and wash sale rule

r/investingSee Post

Beware of Money Managers who Talk Like This

r/investingSee Post

VTI all the way? Or with SWYMX or SWTSX?

r/optionsSee Post

Poor mans covered Call

r/investingSee Post

I hit $100,000 in Broad Market Index Funds (mostly VOO and VTI) this Jan

r/investingSee Post

I have about 10k on hand. Thinking 50% VTI or VT,30% VXUS, and rest 20% in stocks. Unsure about my ETF choices though

r/StockMarketSee Post

18, Any thoughts on picks?

r/investingSee Post

Setting Up First Roth IRA

r/StockMarketSee Post

19, Any advice is appreciated!

r/investingSee Post

Help a Slav to start investing ^_^

r/investingSee Post

Riskier assets in IRA vs Roth?

r/investingSee Post

Target Date Funds (TDF) in Taxable Account for Money Needed in 4-5 Years?

r/optionsSee Post

Covered call strat on VTI but selling 1-2 year out calls

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Bad idea?

r/investingSee Post

Thoughts on moving money from Acorns to VTI and /or QQQM

r/investingSee Post

What to do with $300,000 just sitting in my checking account?

r/investingSee Post

Where is the love for VUG ?

r/investingSee Post

DCA or one time purchase?

r/investingSee Post

ETFs in different investing accounts

r/investingSee Post

Saving for potential house - options?

r/stocksSee Post

Hedging against AI?

r/stocksSee Post

VT vs. combo of VTI and VXUS

r/investingSee Post

Thoughts on 31yo investment portfolio - big pay raise next year and questions

r/investingSee Post

100% stocks is not universally good advice. Stock market indexes are not always the right benchmark for your performance.

r/investingSee Post

What do you think about this strategy?

r/investingSee Post

Is FZIPX same as AVUV? Looking for Low ER small cap ETF

r/investingSee Post

Looking for advice on my investment plan

r/investingSee Post

I'm creating a portfolio for my brother, any thoughts?

r/stocksSee Post

Lost eBay Lego bid war, now have 1.3k, what stock to invest for coping

r/stocksSee Post

BBUS as a good alternative to VOO?

r/investingSee Post

Where to invest 10k leveraged from CC cash advance (5% fee)?

r/stocksSee Post

Is this portfolio unnecessarily complicated?

r/investingSee Post

As a non-US resident is it worth getting Ireland-domiciled ETFs?

r/investingSee Post

3rd year of maxing out my roth ira. How do my allocations look

r/stocksSee Post

Sell some of the VTI to buy Apple, Amazon, NVidia

r/stocksSee Post

Long term stocks

r/investingSee Post

2 accounts, wondering what to do

r/investingSee Post

Liquidating VUN for a US-equivalent ETF

r/investingSee Post

Looking for advice for my Roth IRA

r/investingSee Post

My annual investing checkup

r/investingSee Post

Thinking about Bond ETFs, especially SGOV and BKLN

r/investingSee Post

Start adding international to my brokerage account?

r/stocksSee Post

Help me out please.

r/investingSee Post

Limited International Fund Options in Employer’s 401K Plan?

r/investingSee Post

Choosing spouses growth stocks for taxable account

r/investingSee Post

Buying security after wash sales

r/wallstreetbetsSee Post

Three things that will happen in the next 1-2 months. Willing to ban bet any of these if you are.

r/stocksSee Post

(23) Investing in VTI?

r/investingSee Post

Portfolio advice for begginer

r/investingSee Post

Trying to understand investing in SCHD

r/investingSee Post

Question about tax loss harvesting with VTI & ITOT

r/investingSee Post

Investing a large sum into stocks

r/investingSee Post

Okay Portfolio Going Into 2024? [23 YOLD Looking for long term investments]

r/investingSee Post

Seeking advice regarding AUS trading.

r/investingSee Post

Thinking about a higher growth portfolio for the new year.

r/stocksSee Post

Advice needed

r/investingSee Post

Random question about ETF prices

r/stocksSee Post

Please, your perspective on our shared investment plan?

r/investingSee Post

Investment based on time Horizon

r/investingSee Post

30 year old. What's got the greatest possible potential for returns? TQQQ?

r/investingSee Post

TQQQ + bonds? 65/35? 30 year old

r/investingSee Post

Upcoming Roth IRA enquiry

r/investingSee Post

What is the quality of stock markets in other countries compared to US?

r/investingSee Post

Is it worth staying in Vanguard admiral funds?

r/investingSee Post

Searching for advice on F1 NRA brokerage accounts (Vanguard Vs. Schwab)

r/stocksSee Post

Does it make sense to add individual brokerage account?

r/investingSee Post

Stocks just keep going up

r/investingSee Post

Started 529 account for child, invested in "NH Portfolio 2042 (Fidelity Index)"

r/investingSee Post

Mortgage Payoff Strategy - Thoughts?

r/investingSee Post

Recurring investment portfolio for 2024

r/stocksSee Post

Some things that have helped in my investing journey

r/investingSee Post

Investing for a house in retirement

r/investingSee Post

With IRAs about to reset for 2014 what are you all planning to buy?

r/investingSee Post

Was gifted a brokerage account

r/StockMarketSee Post

Portfollio allocation after move from edward jones

r/investingSee Post

Max out Roth IRA all at once in Jan?

r/investingSee Post

Question about different S&P500 funds

r/investingSee Post

Investment Advice: ESPP and Portfolio

r/stocksSee Post

How to reinvest back into the market?

r/stocksSee Post

Do you ever buy stocks outside of the indexes and Mag 7 near all time highs?

r/investingSee Post

Should I have more diversity with my Investments

r/investingSee Post

Investing brokerage accounts for my kids and nieces - best course of action?

r/investingSee Post

Heavy OTC (FOCPX) Position???

r/investingSee Post

Investing advice for moving around 100k into ETFs

r/investingSee Post

I've got $500K burning a hole in my pocket: should I bet it all on tech stocks?

r/stocksSee Post

I've got $500K burning a hole in my pocket: should I bet it all on tech stocks?

r/investingSee Post

Investment Choices for Brokerage Account

Mentions

Start a 529 for each of them for their college fund. There's a strong argument for VOO, but once rate cuts are becomign closer to reality there's also a good argument to go back to VTI as real estate and small caps can start afford loans again and recover while money theoretically may shift away from tech.

Mentions:#VOO#VTI

>International citizens also don’t invest in their own stock market like the US citizens do. Of course they do. Try talking to people from other countries. Besides, there's Americans that don't invest at all. >What international citizens do invest in is real estate since it is tangible and they have to live somewhere. That's a massive generalization and not universally true. >Let’s also talk about the foreigners who also invest heavily in the US stock market because of it’s growth. Based on global market cap weights the US market is the biggest, so yes many non-Americans will invest primarily in US stocks because of this. It doesn't have anything to do with liking US stocks. >Most would rather put their money in the US than in their own stock market. I even see people outside the US posting their portfolios here and most have significant US exposure. Again, if a non-US investors is investing based on global market cap weights, then of course they will invest primarily in US stocks. But not all of them need to invest in the US to have good returns. In fact some of them can have better returns by avoiding US stocks. [South Africa and Australia have provided better real returns than the US since 1900.](https://www.credit-suisse.com/media/assets/corporate/docs/about-us/research/publications/credit-suisse-global-investment-returns-yearbook-2023-summary-edition.pdf) Not only South Africa and Australia, but other countries have provided higher nominal returns than the US. You seem to think the US has always provided the highest returns, but they haven't. >As the great Warren Buffett says, “don’t bet against America.” International diversification isn't "betting against" America. If someone investing in some International stocks is betting against America, then someone investing 100% in VTI is betting against tech. See how stupid that sounds?

Mentions:#VTI

Probably the main points for most investors are: mutual fund or ETF? Portability (move investments between institutions). Mutual funds are usually exclusive to the brokerage. So if you have a Fidelity mutual fund and then decide to move all your investments to Schwab, you may have to sell your Fidelity mutual fund and buy the equivalent Schwab mutual fund. This may trigger a taxable event if the account type is not a tax-deferred account like a Roth, IRA, etc... mutual fund or ETF? Mutual funds usually have monthly or quarterly distributions...another taxable event. So similar to the previous point, this can be a non-factor if held in a tax-deferred account. ETF's can have a distribution schedule in the form of a dividend. It really depends on the ETF. mutual fund or ETF? Expense ratios. Because mutual funds are usually a "product" that is exclusive to the brokerage, they can offer "no fees / no loads" as way to attract investors. In this regard, they can better than ETF's. The caveat is that you basically have to stay with that brokerage...unless it is a tax-deferred account, then it does not matter. You can buy and sell any equity in a tax-deferred account Roth, IRA, etc...), and only pay taxes when you withdraw the money (hopefully retirement age). I have never seen an ETF with no fees (expense ratio). VTI is a commonly recommended because it has something like .03% expense ratio. SPY, the most traded ETF, has an expense ratio of .09% mutual fund or ETF? Purchasing either equity can have limitations, depending on your brokerage. Most mutual funds let you invest as little as $1, with the caveat that some may have a "minimum investment after 1 year". For example, if the minimum investment is $1000, you can add $1 today, and then $1, and then $43 the next...it does not matter how much you add, as long as you have $1000 in there within a year of buying the mutual fund. This encourages setting up automatic deposits. Purchasing an ETF, in most cases, has to be done in whole shares. So if an ETF is trading at $453.43, your minimum investment will be $453.43. Some brokerages will allow "fractional shares", so that would be functionally similar to purchasing a mutual fund. Also, ETF prices fluctuate by the minute. Mutual fund prices are calculated once per day, at the end of the day. Mutual funds get poo-poo'd a lot on reddit, because everyone likes to regurgitate "VTI and chill", like it is a cool thing to do. It is good "general" advice, but not always the best advice. It really depends on if you ever change brokers, if you ever need to withdraw the money, type of account, etc...

Mentions:#VTI#SPY

I think the data speaks for itself: [https://portfolioslab.com/tools/stock-comparison/CSPX.L/IVV](https://portfolioslab.com/tools/stock-comparison/CSPX.L/IVV) IVV is better. But just food for thought: You are influenced by home country bias, maybe VTI would be safer in the long run.

Mentions:#IVV#VTI

This is one of the endless debates in investing. By every form of investment theory, only investing in a single country (a la VOO or VTI) brings uncompensated additional risk. Historical trends also clearly show that US and exUS performance does swap leadership positions. HOWEVER theory is not always reality, and we have been in a period where the US economy is just outperforming on a whole new level. Europe is limping, and even Chinas growth story seems to be entering a new weaker phase. All the worlds biggest companies are based in the US, the innovation is here, and even with all the global headwinds the US economy is still cruising. Yes it's recency bias, but there's no indication this turned will shift anytime soon. Anyway, I try to balance out those thoughts for me personally. I do VTI/VXUS, 80/20. I'm overweight US for sure, but I'm comfortable with that. For the record, I don't know if I'm making the right decision. I may be shooting myself in the foot on their side of the fence. Dragging myself down with international, or setting myself up for future pain with too much US. I'm just making the decision I am most comfortable with.

Mentions:#VOO#VTI#VXUS

And to answer your question most of those things are not priced into VTI since they are personal to me or characteristics of VTI which itself does not set prices of its component parts.

Mentions:#VTI

>No because the US has proven it grows faster for decades. That depends on the decades we're talking about. I can name you a bunch of decades where they didn't grow faster. >You want them separated. If you held VTI and VXUS at the same proportion they reflect in VT you'll get the same results. I have no idea why you think separating them makes any difference. Holding 50/50 VTI and VXUS would give you even ***more*** International exposure than VT.

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS#VT

Just do half VTI and half VXUS

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS

If you really need the money in 3 years, I would go with a high yield savings account. The problem with even “safe” investments like VTI or VOO is that there are negative years. If you can wait long enough this is usually not a problem but 3 years is not very long.

Mentions:#VTI#VOO

Everyone has their own investing preferences, strategies, goals, risk tolerance, etc. VTI is a fantastic option for long term investing in every single stock in the US

Mentions:#VTI

>In my opinion, it is a high exposure It is market cap weight. VTI is market cap weight within the US, VXUS is market cap weight outside the US. Why not follow market cap weight across US/ex-US as well? >and if the US dominance continues you, will underperform compared to other portfolios with a lower allocation And if favor flips back towards ex-US, VT will outperform your 70/30.

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS#VT

VT is 40% international exposure. In my opinion, it is a high exposure and if the US dominance continues you, will underperform compared to other portfolios with a lower allocation. While I believe having international exposure is important for diversification, as of right now, 40% is too high. I would personally recommend no greater than 30%. VTI & VXUS are great funds for this.

Mentions:#VT#VTI#VXUS

Maybe you meant VEA (developed markets) as VTI is total U.S. In any case I specifically avoid developing markets because I just prefer to avoid some of the risk inherent in those stocks.

Mentions:#VEA#VTI

>when you start to finally see one of them outperforming the other. By the time you see it, you've missed out on the outperformance. How long would VTI or VXUS have to underperform before you accept it's a trend? Are we talking 6 months? 2 years? 10 years? And then what happens when it starts to outperform, change allocations again? This is the definition of buy high, sell low. The benefit of VT is there's no temptation to time the market. Let the global market decide your allocations. VTI & VXUS makes sense if you want a different ratio than VT, but I wouldn't recommend changing it. Like if you want 70/30 then you keep rebalancing to keep it 70/30, just like you'd keep rebalancing if you hade bonds.

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS#VT

Additionally VTI is not world total market, the stocks from 2 most interesting countries China and India are not there, because countries block foreign capital from investing in their most promising stocks. So VTI is US, EU, Japan and a lot of crap.

Mentions:#VTI#EU

Given this, would VTI & VXUS make sense? You’d want to allocate between US and ex US equities when you start to finally see one of them outperforming the other.

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS

Feedback on my ROTH IRA and investment help for a young investor. I’m 19 and have been investing into my Roth and taxable brokerage for just about a year now. I’ve watched numerous videos on how to invest in a Roth at my age and have seen many different strategies but would like to get other opinions on my portfolio from other voices and people who have been in the markets longer then I have. I contribute $525 a month into my Roth and $100 into my taxable brokerage account as of now for reference. My current Roth IRA breakdown goes as such. 25% $VTI 22% $SCHD 19% $O 13% $STAG 12% $MAIN 9% XLV My current plan is to sell out of $STAG because I am practically at break even and have seen no gains besides the dividend reinvestments and allocate a majority of this holding into VTI and SCHD split. I know as a young investor I should be based more so on growth oriented stocks and ETFS but the instant payments from MAIN and O$ which I’m up a good % on are just too pleasing to my mental. For my taxable I have just about 1000$ in it and just have a 50/50 $DGRO $SCHD split. Any thing helps and would love to discuss any portfolio changes thanks !

Same question, I was 70/30 VTI/VXUS but idk, I’m 32 and VT looks more appropriate for me

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS#VT

There are diminishing marginal benefits to diversification. An argument for VTI that has nothing to do with performance is it is diversified enough but has a lower expense ratio. It is also more tax efficient with a lower yield. From a philosophical standpoint you might not be comfortable with governance across all companies in VT. These are some reasons I keep developed markets (VEA) instead and keep it as a smaller-than-market weight. Doesn't hurt that I also just believe the U.S. companies will continue to outperform.

Mentions:#VTI#VT#VEA

Probably. But honestly I only play options with what I consider my slush fund. When I hit over $75k or so in uninvested money in my non--retirement acct I just stick all but 25k into VOO/VTI/SCHD and play with the rest. Until the next quarter when my company options mature and I start again.

Mentions:#VOO#VTI#SCHD

As SirGlass said, the difference is negligable, but you'll find varying opinions one way or the other same as VTI vs VOO. I was always camp MF because Vanguard didn't have automated investing in ETFs. But once they added partial shares for their own ETFs, they also added automated investing. In typical Vanguard fashion, MFs can pull directly from your bank and into the fund on a schedule. The ETF automation configuration screens look completely different, are in a completely different place, and you have to pull money from your settlement account (which is a MF and has to be pre-deposited with the above setup first). It works fine once you have the damn logistics figured out, but if the funds I was in weren't 100k minimum MFs, I'd skip the ETFs on them too because it's a pain in the ass.

Mentions:#VTI#VOO

Look at the SCHD stock price chart over the past 5 years. It's a bit slower the past year, but in general their investments have decent growth, so that $2295 itself will also grow over the years. You both grow the principal and earn dividend income. With HYSA the principal remains the same, and you just take whatever rate the bank gives you, which will likely decline in the coming years as interest rates get cut. The downside with SCHD it is ultimately tied to the stock market, so yes, your principal could decline in value if the stock market crashes, but if you don't panic sell, America has always recovered from its crashes. Also, SCHD is much more diversified than VTI (nearly 30% tech) and VOO (Nearly 50% tech). If you are worried that the tech sector might be in a bubble and risk a rug pull if the current AI hype doesn't pan out or just dies down next year, SCHD is fairly safe from that

Set up recurring stock purchases. Depending on your budget. For example, buy $50 of SPY, NVDA, TSLA, BRK.B, VTI daily. Any extra cash in your brokerage can earn 5% to 5.25% APY If there's a massive red day, you can manually buy more than $50.

Holy shit. Congrats and fuck me. Take a chunk of that and buy some VTI or SPY or something.

Mentions:#VTI#SPY

I agree. The S&P500 (VOO) is very tech heavy, so pairing SCHG with VTI would increase your exposure to the market.

Mentions:#VOO#SCHG#VTI

You could just put it all in VOO and likely outperform any other more complicated strategies. It’s an S&P 500 etf with low fees. It’s inherently diversified. If you want more diversification you could do VTI. It’s a total us stock market etf with low fees. It’s more diverse and generally returns a little less than a S&P 500 index. If you want more diversification you could add in an international fund like VXUS or VTIAX. They typically don’t perform nearly as well as US stocks but the guys advocating for going international will say that past performance does not guarantee future success - yadda yadda, I just don’t care about international stocks personally and am ok accepting more risk to likely come out much further ahead by not putting a significant chunk in international. Personally I like risk, so I just put it all on VOO. And it’s not really a risky strategy, just more risky than the boggleheads recommend.

Yeah that's ridiculous. Figure out whatever bond or cash allocation she wants (in a high interest savings account). Then take the rest and buy VTI. Done.

Mentions:#VTI

This is great advice. "Real" options trading is all about statistical distributions. With only 1k, you can't manage sizing and risk in a reasonable way without trail risk threatening ruin. Options strategies only use a few percent of an account, so 1k means your value at risk should be less than 100 at a time. There are very very few strategies that can succeed like that. 1k is a lotto ticket, not really trading. Taking that 1k and but and holding in a broad market ETF is definitely my suggestion. Or practice asset allocation between something VOO/VTI, and fixed income ETFs. When you have around $20k, you can start thinking about trying "the wheel" on some stock that's around $100-$200 if you want to do your toe in options trading. My opinion: if you start options trading with less than $5k, you will probably lose it all even in a normal market due to stochastic processes. You're really really constrained until 10-20k. Things get a little more comfortable at 50k. You can manage positions comfortably at 100k. Final note: of you want to be good at options trading, take A LOT of math in school. Probability, statistics, numerical methods, differential equations, optimization techniques. All of those are also prepping you for AI/ML. Try to get to the point that you can derive Black-Scholes by hand, understanding the limitations and approximations.

If you gonna sell for crazy gains, I'd go cash or VTI. I wouldn't gamble anymore tbh..

Mentions:#VTI

Thank you so much for explaining this!!! I picked my international fund. I just couldn’t decide between VOO and VTI. I really like SCHG. Since it’s so tech heavy, I was thinking it would pair better with VTI than VOO.

Mentions:#VOO#VTI#SCHG

50% SCHD seems like an odd choice. I'd prob do 50% VTI, then for the rest of your questions: 1. Tech - VGT 2. VNQ, but it's not great 3. QQQM (I think VGT already is a better QQQM anyways) 4. VOO, the GOAT

As I said in another recent thread, DRIP is only if you'd buy the stock at the current price. There's nothing wrong with holding a stock long term but not reinvesting in it. I scooped up some regional banks' stock in 2020 during the worst of the pandemic. They have an excellent yield compared to the purchase price but I think they're currently overvalued compared to general market, so I don't DRIP them. On the other hand, I have some staples like KO and funds like VIG that I just leave reinvesting. *what do you use it for* Pretty much anything I don't DRIP goes into an VTI/VOO or equivalent fund. All of my brokers have some form of partial share purchase at this point, so it's mostly automated, plus a few days at most.

Reits suck. Dump them. VTI and VXUS or VT. feed and hold for 30+ years then start looking at dividends.

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS#VT

You are trading not investing, that’s the entire problem. Put everything into VOO, RSP, VTI it really doesn’t matter much but a large well diversified ETF or a vanguard target date fund Then just stop looking so much, if it goes down buy more, it goes up buy more, long run that numbers gonna get very green. If you can’t handle not trading and wont be able to watch it fluctuate up and down then consider a wealth manager or robomanager

Mentions:#VOO#RSP#VTI

I said hedge funds, because on average hedge funds do in fact UNDERPERFORM the market (VTI, etc). So if you are outperforming the market, you are also outperforming hedge funds collectively. https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/030916/buffetts-bet-hedge-funds-year-eight-brka-brkb.asp Keep in mind this is just one example, but there is a lot of research on this topic that comes to the same conclusion; there’s good reasons why Buffet was so confident to make this bet.

Mentions:#VTI

I didn't say hedge fund managers. You stated that you were happy making what the typical funds makes, I assume VTI, VTWO, etc., which is around 10% annually. That doesn't mean index funds make money every year, but over long periods of time that's been the average return. At any rate, I'm done talking to you.

Mentions:#VTI#VTWO

5,000 in Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Meta, Apple and the rest in VOO / VTI

Mentions:#VOO#VTI

FWIW, albeit almost nothing coming from a random commenter. I agree with you about the election. Just look at the recent election in India, I genuinely cannot find a *specific* argument as to why the two regional parties Modi now needs for his majority (vote) would in any way hinder his economic policies (though thankfully makes his changing the constitution less likely) yet as soon as his BJP lost its outright majority the market lost tons of value. (I understand much of this was from of Adani's companies and understand why). I bought as much India ETF as I could. Returns have been better than VTI and I pay very close attention to world politics so it's a bit of an outlier to this particular forum (95% of my investments are VTI or equivalent). TLDR: Anyway all of this rambling to say that with the *exceptional* pessimism surrounding either a Trump or Biden win I agree that post the post election market will dip no matter what. I would almost never advocate trying to time the market, but I think this is the closest to a sure bet you can get. I am keeping significant "dry powder" to take advantage of this as well, of course, to buy more VTI or VOO.

Mentions:#VTI#VOO

They're mostly interchangeable as far as returns go. VOO tracks the US's 500 biggest companies and VTI tracks the whole US stock market. I prefer VTI. It captures the whole market and is more tax efficient than most funds. If you want 40% exposure to the international market as well, go VT which is a 60/40 combo of VTI and VXUS(international). VT is slightly less tax efficient than getting the two funds separate, but it's as comprehensive as you can get for consistent okay gains to set and forget. Many people don't like so much International exposure but it's weighted pretty well to represent the world.

It's over. Pack it up. Seriously though, if you need actual advice; that was a horrible investment. If and when you decide to invest again, just pick a broad index fund like VTI or something like that. Invest, forget about it, come back in a few years, and you'll outpace most "get rich quick schemes". You won't make life changing money, but it pretty consistently does well.

Mentions:#VTI

If you guys don’t mind, could you explain what makes you choose VOO over VTI or vice versa?

Mentions:#VOO#VTI

Honestly, just go for VTI or some other fund that is highly diversified. Just let it accumulate and keep up working your current job. You only need about 1 mill to retire if you own a home so honestly just try and keep saving. Judging by the loss of 70k you seem to have a decent income. Just keep working

Mentions:#VTI

Buy VTI shares

Mentions:#VTI

Would swapping IVW for VTI meet that need? I do prefer taking more risk for growth over the next 20 years

Mentions:#IVW#VTI

I get the attraction of dividend focused funds, but please consider putting at least some of the money into more generally focused funds. It's a minor pain having to manually sell shares periodically rather than just withdrawing dividends, but look at the performance over the past decade (the chart includes reinvesting dividends with a 0% tax rate): http://stockcharts.com/h-perf/ui?s=VTI&compare=VIG,VOO,VYM&id=p20037387721 There's basically no time that the dividend focused funds did better than the general market ones, but over the decade there's ~100% better performance. I do hold a few different dividend focused funds in my Roth as a hedge against the market changing, but consider keeping some of it in a broad market fund instead. Income is income, it doesn't matter whether it comes from a dividend (which you have no control over) or selling ETFs/stocks selectively.

The potential upside is limited but for me it is a guaranteed upside as long as I remain solvent. other stuff may have more potential upside but defintely not guaranteed. and yeah I'm generally long market using VTI

Mentions:#VTI

Thanks! I think I'll go with a VTI/VXUS 90/10 split. Currently doing that in my IRA as well

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS

Agree wholeheartedly. I bought $8,500 of VTI this morning. I figure I can't retire for the next 15 years and I can just about guarantee it will be higher 15 years from now. Stressing about it today accomplishes nothing.

Mentions:#VTI

How soon do you plan to use the money? If you’re investing in VTI then I assume 10+ years. If that’s the case does the election later this year really matter that much?

Mentions:#VTI

The historical 15 year average return of the market (VTI) is around 14%, which is more than you would get from a high yield savings account. The trade off being more risk. However, the more time you have that money can be invested for you, the less risky it is as you have leeway to endure through any periods where the market may correct. I would suggest scrolling up to the opening post and finding the links to the getting started resources. You can also checkout learning material at sites like [https://www.investor.gov/](https://www.investor.gov/)

Mentions:#VTI

If you’re looking for someone else to make that decision for you, you probably ought to reconsider this game and buy and hold VTI instead.

Mentions:#VTI

all of your assumptions and comparisons are based on moving to an only slightly more diversified fund (SPY). you're missing out on mid- and small-cap US stocks (e.g. in VTI) and international stocks (e.g. in VXUS or VT). those would have a greater likelihood of recovering than your single mega cap stock and SPY (should they crash) while providing theoretically equal returns (if they don't), thus having better risk-adjusted returns.

You need to sell anytime soon and call it a day, put it into something boring like VTI and enjoy good dividends retirement Crash incoming possibly, btw congrats and fuck you

Mentions:#VTI

You’re ahead of the game if you’re that early but don’t be an idiot and just max your Roth IRA and buy VOO and VTI or something similar and then invest the rest into whatever you’re doing now. Roth IRA at even 20 will be worth around 2M by 65 tax free. If you haven’t done that already, do it.

Mentions:#VOO#VTI

Im in the same boat but with VOO and VTI lol

Mentions:#VOO#VTI

Going to counter with VTI

Mentions:#VTI

The sp500 is up 15.4% year to date and 25.37% over the last year. VTI is up 23% over the last 12 months. Since we have no idea how risky or tax efficient your portfolio is, it’s impossible to tell if you are over or underperforming based on these screenshots.

Mentions:#VTI

My holdings in the red today: Nvidia, VTI, HIMS, QQQ, Apple, VXUS, Eli Lilly. My holdings in the green: Japanese Hedged Equity, Boeing, GameStop Ik it’s one bearish day, but that reads as end times lol

Very aggressive approach definitely not moderate risk however you should look to diversify your portfolio. Large cap and S&P 500? Heavy overlap here so you should consider VTI which also includes small and mid cap companies. Not sure why you hold a Nasdaq fund and a Semiconductor fund as most of companies can be found in the S&P 500. There’s also no international exposure which means you’ve placed a big bet on the US.

Mentions:#VTI

This is why diversifying is smart. Most of these stocks are down 2-5% today, but VOO (S&P500) is only down 0.28% and VTI (total stock market) is only down 0.25%. Some other diversified funds are actually up today, such as VFVA (Vanguard value ETF) which is up 0.48% today.

Mentions:#VOO#VTI#VFVA

FXROZ or VTI are good options for low-cost index funds. HYSA's are best from large FDIC-insured banks that offer 4.3% or more currently (some 5%+).

Mentions:#VTI#HYSA

It’s not dumb to invest with small amounts, it’s dumb to try and gamble to get rich quick. Many people have been successful investing putting in a couple dollar a week into something like VTI and letting compound growth do the rest.

Mentions:#VTI

I'm ready for downvotes for this advice: invest in yourself first. learn skills, take courses (real or virtual), buy tools or software, practice, learn, grow. You will make vastly more money (at your level of investment) by becoming more valuable and employable, than you will by adding $10 a week to your portfolio. If you want to do both, then you should invest in things that are going to regularly increase over long time periods. There's nothing wrong with VTI (full market, stable over long periods) or VGT (tech, more risk, more volatility, potentially more reward).

Mentions:#VTI#VGT

Telling a 65 yo to sell his properties and invest in VTI. Come on bro. Go back to your boggle head corner and stay there.

Mentions:#VTI

So add an extended markets fund. Or replace the S&P holding with a US total market fund (like VTI) to have both in one. Maybe some international stock too.

Mentions:#VTI

VTI or VOO + VXUS if you're holding in a taxable account. VT doesn't qualify for the IRS foreign tax credit. Fund's need to have 50%+ in foreign holdings to be able to pass through foreign tax credits.

yup, liquidity challenges are a real problem for people more than net worth. If you lose your job or if you want to move and rent out this house you might need money for a down payment. So aside from VOO / VTI earning about 2x OP's borrowing rate on long term average, access to liquidity likely beats emotional "freedom" of no mortgage at their age / stage of life

Mentions:#VOO#VTI

I’ve never heard of VTI or SPY.

Mentions:#VTI#SPY

VTI gets even more US stocks, since VOO leaves out small-cap. VT gets you global exposure. You missed out if you weren't invested in Denmark in 2020, Austria in 2021, Portugal in 2022, or Italy in 2023.

Mentions:#VTI#VOO#VT

Dump it in VTI, retire at 45 at a 4% withdraw annually and you’ll be able to live on $175k a year and leave behind a trust fund. Or put it all on black. Either way congrats and fuck you.

Mentions:#VTI

I just did something similar this morning, but none of the things I sold to buy ETFs were tech stocks. I can't being myself to sell anything in tech because of the way tech is currently exploding, but I think it's worth it to sell anything underperforming and roll it into VOO or VTI

Mentions:#VOO#VTI

Young investor starting out. Any ideas / suggestions on my portfolio? - BND - NVDA - VTI

Mentions:#BND#NVDA#VTI

I'm with you here. That being said, I did liquidate my ASTS shares (6000) after they were up over 150%. I'm putting more of that into RKLB now and likely a longer term hold, and boring old VTI.

Lmao a bunch of regards just looked up VTI Spy all the way though ![img](emote|t5_2th52|4258)

Mentions:#VTI

I'm (22 y/o) debating whether to dump my pension in SPY or VTI. Lmk what you think; upvote for SPY and downvote for VTI ![img](emote|t5_2th52|12787)

Mentions:#SPY#VTI

I'm (22 y/o) debating whether to dump my pension in SPY or VTI. Lmk what you think; upvote for SPY and downvote for VTI ![img](emote|t5_2th52|12787)

Mentions:#SPY#VTI

VTI

Mentions:#VTI

Depends on your time frame. It is most likely you will lose 0-10% in the next 3-6 months . Long term ( 5-10 years ) in a good etf like VTI OR SPY you should be golden . If your to scared to invest it, put it the cash account for vanguard and make 5+%. Make sure to keep a cash cushion 3-6 months of expenses.

Mentions:#VTI#SPY

I can still call this month to have a VTSAX>VTI conversion with no fee?

Mentions:#VTSAX#VTI

VGLT / TLT or the overpowered option in TMF Yes, bonds. 20y+ bonds. They will go up up up imo in the next 6-18months and we are still early imo.. That is - too - cause I dont see any bonds yet in your portfolio? Else, just go index funds, VTI or VOO both are fine and add some international i.e. VXUS, classic 80/20 split.. Gl!

Charting is nonsense, it doesn't work. And frankly *you're right*, the market is efficient and people with *years of experience and the best possible education, models and AI are your enemies*. Your chance if winning is extremely small. You'd not try tok outrun Usaine Bolt, outswim Michael Phelps or outsmart Albert Einstein. Yet every shoeshine boy thinks he can outsmart economists, hedgefund managers and professional investors. Nah, you can get *lucky* short term but long term you'll lose. The only way to win, statistically, is to *not play at all*. Buy a whole market index fund, buy the S&P500/VTI/VOO and get a guaranteed good return over time. Set aside 10% of your money and try charts, TA, resistances, trading letters, pods, reddit pumps or whatever. Try your luck...and be prepared to lose.

Mentions:#VTI#VOO

Doubt it will stop people from making money from VTI.

Mentions:#VTI

Ooh very nice. Looks like I missed this one when I added VOO and VTI to my radar way back when.

Mentions:#VOO#VTI

1. Funds seem fine to me 2. VTI or VTI and VXUS or just VT are all good options 3. Nah you don't need to worry about any of that

Mentions:#VTI#VXUS#VT

Technically your brokerage could just be all VTI as everything else is subsumed in it. I'd at least combine VTI and SPY into just VTI. The others would make you overweight tech but if you feel good about it, sure?

Mentions:#VTI#SPY

Hi all! I have read so many posts and it gets confusing after a while to determine how I should go about which etfs to choose. What I have narrowed it down is Growth ETF: QQQM, SCHG, and VOO Roth IRA: SCHD, VOO, VTI To be blunt I just want to know if these etfs are worth my money to invest. Ideally in the next 5-10years I would like to have a part time job and live off of $10,000 worth of annual dividends (i plan to move with my partner to the Philippines). Any advice on these etf picks and other etfs would be great!

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