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r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The Newest Crypto Bill Introduced in Congress

r/BitcoinSee Post

🚨 BREAKING: ARKK analyst has discovered that Bitcoin has historical 9 straight weeks of candles 🕯

r/BitcoinSee Post

What is creating this big sell pressure this last days? Why MARA and COIN are up but BTC down? Feels like a coordinated attack trying to liquidate leveraged longs.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What is creating this big sell pressure this last days? Why MARA and COIN are up but BTC down? Feels like a coordinated attack trying to liquidate leveraged longs.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Hedgies Don't Pass Go: Straight To Rekt City

r/BitcoinSee Post

I'M ALL IN: Bitcoin & The Exponential Age.

r/BitcoinSee Post

Analysis: Correlation between Bitcoin and the stock market correlation are near an all time high

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Analysis: Bitcoin and Stock-market correlation are near an all time high, possibly indicating BTC is largely adopted by traditional institutions

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Cathie Woods “big ideas 2022” - an alternate take based on her ETFs performance. She can’t manage money, I can’t trust her hopium.

r/BitcoinSee Post

BTC vs ARKK ETF. Since October, they have literally been the same chart

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Is cryptocurrency still relevant in 2022?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Valuable article from ARKK how to value bitcoin in on-chain analysis. Obviously, these metrics can be used for any other cryptocurrency.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ARK Invest ($ARKK) just published this whitepaper on how to value Bitcoin's fundamentals using the power of on-chain data.

r/BitcoinSee Post

ARK Invest ($ARKK) just published this whitepaper on how to value Bitcoin's fundamentals using the power of on-chain data.

r/BitcoinSee Post

Technical Analysis...

r/BitcoinSee Post

Looking at getting GBTC for my roth. Is it worth putting some MSTR or ARKK in there as well, or stick with just gbtc?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Is Grayscale GDLC the best arbitrage play of our lifetime? 20% discount to net assets? or is something odd happening?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Tokenized stocks on FTX issue

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Cathie Wood's ARK funds hold millions of Robinhood shares ($HOOD)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Coinbase will propose a regulatory framework for crypto to federal officials in the coming days (not confirmed by their official spokesperson yet). Cathie Wood's (ARKK) bought more shares of Coinbase on Tuesday/yesterday.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Tired of Crypto apps, exchanges, hardware wallets? Consider the Stock Market.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ETFs could be the Catalyst that send Bitcoin to Six Figures

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Aunty Cathie bought 1 million shares of Grayscale Bitcoin Trust during crypto’s drop below $30,000

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Sector Rotation : Why you shouldnt panic during sell offs (long term perspective)

Mentions

She also thinks her basket of dogshit companies in her ARKK fund labeled as “Disruptive innovators” will like 20x by 2030. Saying that the overall market cap of these types of companies as a whole “currently valued at 13 trillion” will be worth over 200 trillion+. Lady is delusional.

Mentions:#ARKK

ARKK is down 1% over the past 5 years so why does she continue to get screen time?

Mentions:#ARKK

tldr; Cathie Wood’s ARK Innovation ETF (ARKK) came roaring back in January, notching a partial bounceback from its tumultuous time in 2022. Shares of the exchange traded fund closed out the month at $39.93, a near 28% increase from the end of December. The fund also holds millions of shares of cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase. *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Cathie did an amazing job with its ARKK ETF. I believe she is right again.

Mentions:#ARKK

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

The stock market is on hopium that FED interest rate hikes are coming to an end, the economy is “strong” enough to handle them, and that the FED will cut rates this year despite saying they won’t. This leads to a risk on rally which includes BTC and tech. Just look at how ARKK has performed in comparison to 2022. Everything growth oriented is rallying right now. However, if you think this isn’t the bottom and the economy will get a lot worse, then you should look for defensives that will rally from people rotating their profits out of this rally. Personally, I’m bullish on Verizon. For BTC I feel that this is a massive short squeeze after liquidating big players in the market. It looks like the contagion has stopped for now, because this rally will allow overleveraged companies to sell. I’m sure a lot of companies (binance) were shitting themselves and scared of going under. So mark my words, this rally can’t go too high because big money needs to deleverage and reduce risk.

Mentions:#BTC#ARKK

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/10af5f6/daily_general_discussion_january_13_2023_gmt0/).

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/109k9wk/daily_general_discussion_january_12_2023_gmt0/).

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/109k9wk/daily_general_discussion_january_12_2023_gmt0/).

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/109k9wk/daily_general_discussion_january_12_2023_gmt0/).

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

crypto going bust, means lots of margin calls for players as Tether, GBTC and this is possible on full blown recession. But i'm pretty sure we create new inflation wave downroad before we go into such phase. everyone are just want go back into bull market as soon as possible, and thus create house on sand. So far gamblers are out ARKK is down 84% just like nasdaq from 2001 bubble.

Mentions:#GBTC#ARKK

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/109k9wk/daily_general_discussion_january_12_2023_gmt0/).

tldr; Ark Invest, the investment firm led by Cathie Wood, purchased another 33,756 shares in crypto exchange Coinbase (COIN), on Tuesday. The purchase is worth roughly $1.45 million based on COIN’s price of $43.23 at press time, with the shares allocated to the ARK Innovation ETF (ARKK) fund. *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*

There’s a reason why $ARKK is down on the 5 year chart

Mentions:#ARKK

Shorting the fund is probably more effective. People get into a rage over Cathie Wood since ARKK is down 80% from ATH. You'll see people on WSB shorting out of spite.

Mentions:#ARKK#WSB

I once had a large portion of my portfolio in ARKK. It's a much smaller portion now. Not because I sold any, just because it tanked so hard.

Mentions:#ARKK

I have faith in Coinbase, built over years of use and seeing the platform develop. My first BTC purchase was on Coinbase in 2017! I've been invested in ARKK for much less time and can only blame myself for following a hype bandwagon and throwing in large sums at the top. I'm usually more prudent when investing. Anyhow, here we are. I'll see if Ms. Woods can impress me as much as Coinbase has.

Mentions:#BTC#ARKK

Except it isnt really Cathys fund, its her investors fund which she is spending rather recklessly throughout the year. She has been catching knives in all her major holdings - TSLA, COIN etc.. ARKK has all but erased its entire gain of the last few years ...

I thought there would be some discount with how ARKK is doing.

Mentions:#ARKK

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/zpcbey/daily_general_discussion_december_19_2022_gmt0/).

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

I can't believe I actually made a tiny profit trading COIN last year. Was a small window of opportunity. (But then I'm down 10K in ARKK. Karma.)

Mentions:#COIN#ARKK

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Why does anyone care? Her track record is the opposite of impressive at this point. She underperforms the US stock market over the duration of her fund with much more risk (https://www.portfoliovisualizer.com/backtest-portfolio?s=y&timePeriod=4&startYear=1985&firstMonth=1&endYear=2022&lastMonth=12&calendarAligned=true&includeYTD=false&initialAmount=10000&annualOperation=0&annualAdjustment=0&inflationAdjusted=true&annualPercentage=0.0&frequency=4&rebalanceType=1&absoluteDeviation=5.0&relativeDeviation=25.0&leverageType=0&leverageRatio=0.0&debtAmount=0&debtInterest=0.0&maintenanceMargin=25.0&leveragedBenchmark=false&reinvestDividends=true&showYield=false&showFactors=false&factorModel=3&portfolioNames=false&portfolioName1=Portfolio+1&portfolioName2=Portfolio+2&portfolioName3=Portfolio+3&symbol1=VTSMX&allocation1_1=100&symbol2=ARKK&allocation2_2=100)

Mentions:#ARKK

tldr; Ark Invest added 296,578 COIN shares to its exchange-traded funds (ETFs) on Wednesday. The largest purchase of 176,364 shares went to the flagship Ark Innovation ETF (ARKK), increasing its holdings to a total of 6,139,480 shares worth $246.7 million. *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/zjfh30/daily_general_discussion_december_12_2022_gmt0/).

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/zi7uwk/daily_general_discussion_december_11_2022_gmt0/).

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

It's probably inspired by ARKK.

Mentions:#ARKK

Still sounds better than ARKK.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z9k3aj/monthly_optimists_discussion_december_2022/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z97v8h/daily_general_discussion_december_1_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z4sdjp/daily_general_discussion_november_26_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z3yh86/daily_general_discussion_november_25_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

ARKK - the second sound of a soul leaving the human body.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Maybe, but given she's down nearly 70% for the same I would consider that data point well and truly obsolete now. This year alone wiped out 5 years of gains and if the trend continues, ARKK will end up lower than its inception price from 2014 within the next year or two (it's already pretty close).

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Where are you getting your numbers from? ARKK is -4.41 %, not positive anything. Even if you bought 5 years ago, you would be down on it.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z1empq/daily_general_discussion_november_22_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Oh God. I would love to see the people that invest in that mess of an ETF.. ARKK has to be the biggest pile of shit I have seen in a good bit.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

ARKK has returned ~23% annually since its launch in 2014. This beats the S&P 500’s ~14% annualized return over the same period. Math might not be my strong suit, but I can look at two numbers and tell you which one is bigger at the very least. The past 12 months have been unkind to everyone in this space. No trader or fund is immune here. That being said, what about her track record give you the impression that you're smarter than her?

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Considering that ARKK has lost 70% of its value in the last year and is currently trading at a 5-year low, I'm not sure that Cathie Wood is the investor to follow.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

My ARKK holdings are down so much I don't even bother removing them. They're my worst ETF investments in the past 2 decades. ARK is like the ICP of ETFs. No one takes it seriously anymore.

Mentions:#ARKK#ARK#ICP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

ARKK lady just bought a bunch more if that means anything.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

We all love and know Cathie Wood (ARKK) the trend is your friend.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Cathie has been consistently buying up heavy bags the last year, my guess is for a pretty hefty under-the-table paycheck to an offshore company of hers or in crypto. So I see ARKK investing into something as terrible news. But that's just my view

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I agree they should prove it. But I also know that Grayscale’s parent company is the largest shareholder… why would they buy into something that didn’t exist? ARKK bought GBTC… they wouldn’t do DD? Coinbase and Grayscale are both heavily regulated by the SEC and audited… everyone is in on it? I think they have the bitcoin, but you don’t have to think that or buy any.

Mentions:#ARKK#GBTC
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I personally prefer to keep my keys. But if I had a retirement account that could buy it I definitely would. I also understand people that do buy it. ARKK bought it precisely because of the this.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I trust Bitcoin, but not someone who runs ARKK.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I was pretty sure that Grayscale is going to survive, but then I read this. >Ark Invest had recently acquired the Grayscale Bitcoin Trust shares at a total value of 2.8 million. Anything $ARKK touches nowadays turn into shambles. So, now i am not sure. ​ On a serious note, GBTC and ETHE trusts are controlled by Grayscale, and not genesis. Their may be some turbulances, and premium may further decrease considering the current financial troubles. But, I don't think they are going to dissolve $10B worth of GBTC and ETHE, just to solve the problem of $175M locked in FTX.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

tldr; Ark Invest, the investment firm run by long-time Bitcoin bull Cathie Wood, has purchased 420,949 shares of Coinbase worth $21.4 million. The largest part of the total amount of purchased shares went towards ARKK, the company’s flagship exchange-traded fund that invests in companies targeting disruptive innovation. Shares in the company are down almost 80% since the start of the year. *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*

Mentions:#ARKK#DYOR
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I don't have a dog in this, but I'm invested in equities... the divergence between Crypto and equities is pretty interesting to me. It looks like WS is crashing anything that is considered speculative (ARKK/Crypto) but everything else is holding up pretty well. Now that those supports have been taken out, you gotta figure $13k is coming soon.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I got burned by ARK and then years later bought into the etf ARKK and got burned by that too lmao.

Mentions:#ARK#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/yo70l5/daily_general_discussion_november_7_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

How’s ARKK doing, Cathie?

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/ykmhcv/daily_general_discussion_november_3_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

We can speak again about Kathie's brilliance when ARKK recovers the 76% that it has lost from it's high. You read that right, 76%.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Based on the documentation / fund descriptions, I would expect a fund like ARKW or ARKK to have significant exposure to companies like Tesla, Roku, Coin, Zoom, Square, Twilio, GBTC, etc. It's not like these funds are advertised as being "safe retirement packages". They are advertised (literally says in the prospectus since their inception) as being extremely high risk, with 10+-year time horizons on projections, targeting some industries that yet to be regulated, and says explicitly in all documentation **"Please read the risk disclosure carefully."** If you want low-risk with significant exposure to established companies, there are a thousand ETFs for that. But some people like *some* high-risk, targeting specific industries, in their portfolio.

Mentions:#ARKK#GBTC
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Please use it to pay us back for ARKK. Thanks.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/BitcoinSee Comment

Love/hate relationship with her. I like the progressive objectives in some of her funds and i can invest my wife’s portfolio into her funds cuz it’s important to her to support women, but f’k is she awful at buying tops. ARKK funds are extra rekt

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I think this was ARKK investments or at least they made a similar prediction. Their predictions are always wild.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Finally, somebody being more bullish on Bitcon than ARKK invest. (I believe ARKK is predicting 1.25M by 2030)

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

ARKK? Lol.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Lol damn looking at ARKK's price hurts

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I believe it's from the same people who brought us the inverse ARKK (Cathie Wood) ETF.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

exactly. It's a nice idea but the timing is atrocious frankly. You could track many *existing* ETF's for this year and the performance would also be atrocious. \*cries in Cathy Wood's ARKK\*

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. These responses are US-based. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many individual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Pros: > > * Regulated by the SEC. Very low risk of being shut down by regulation > * Very easy to trade on stock trading platforms > * Allows you to diversify by investing in a bucket of stocks > * High security. Almost no risk of getting hacked, rugpulled, or scammed, etc. > * Low risk of account or balance loss due to user error. Customer support systems exist to recover from user mistakes. > * Very low volatility compared to crypto investments > * There is a huge variety of different ETFs (market index, sector, leveraged, inverse, active/specialty, exotic) > * Index ETFs follow market indexes and typically have very low management fees. Typically provides a 7-9% annual total return. > * Exotic and foreign market ETFs allow you to easily trade buckets representing assets that you typically would not have direct access to. > * Most exchanges do not charge transaction fees for trading ETFs. > * Market cap in the $10s of Trillions > > The biggest pros compared to crypto are that ETFs are low risk, low volatility, secure, and will allow you to sleep peacefully at night. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Pros: > > * The main pros for crypto ETFs are the same as for ETFs in general. They are regulated by the SEC and have low risk of being shut down by regulation. You don't have to worry about storing your own coins or not being able to recover your account. > * With ETFs, you can invest in blockchain companies and mining companies, allowing you more diversification of of your crypto investments. > * ETFs make it easier to invest indirectly in crypto within traditional tax-advantaged and retirement accounts. > * Fees to buy/sell crypto directly can be very expensive. Coinbase (non-Pro) and Gemini (non-ActiveTrader) often charge 1-3% fees for crypto purchases. ETFs don't have trading fees. > * ETF trades are settled near-instantaneously compared to crypto-settlement, which can be as slow as 30 seconds to 30 minutes. For withdrawals, ETFs use ACH, which takes 3-business days while centralized crypto exchanges like Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, take a much longer 5-10 days. FTX US even has a super-long 15-day fiat withdrawal period.^1 > * While they don't yet exist, there could be crypto ETFs in the future that allow you to hold a variety of different coins at once in a single ETFs. This would allow you to diversify. It would also save greatly on fees since the ETF gets benefits from economies of scale. > * Less hassle with taxes. It's so much easier to fill in 1099B and 1099-DIV for traditional investment accounts. > * It's much easier to set up beneficiaries for your crypto in traditional investment accounts. > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing, but they do make it much easier to hold a basket of cryptocurrencies without buying each of them individually. > > --------------- > > Footnotes: > > 1. CEXes withdrawal time is usually based on when you deposited the fiat on a FIFO basis, so it can be shorter than the usual 5-10 days. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoq7s/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_proarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Yea, but do u want ARKK, or BTC exposure?

Mentions:#ARKK#BTC
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

What do you think ARKK does. Her funds dying but Cathy is still making money lol.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I think ARKK includes some Coinbase stock but it's around 4% weight or so. Also Tesla is the biggest at around 10%, but they sold 75% of their BTC back when BTC was around $30k

Mentions:#ARKK#BTC
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

That's why I mentioned SARKK, it's the inverse of ARKK

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Depends on if you invested in ARKK or SARKK. Huge difference.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

In 2018 I lost money with a interoperability coin called ARK In 2022 I lost money with an ETF run by Cathy Woods called ARKK.

Mentions:#ARK#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

ARKK and microstrategy definitely correlate the most with BTC (in a positive way).

Mentions:#ARKK#BTC
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

YOLO your remaining cash into 0dte ARKK puts Also, post lossporn Stupid fucking Ape

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Well- 1. Banks can’t ban shit. That’d be the federal (maybe state) government. I am assuming you’re im the US here but which sovereign nation let’s their banks ban things???? 2. Everything is down. Some of my stocks are down just as much as my crypto (looking at you ARKK). 3. You wrote a lot of words about people who can’t even reason out 1 and 2. I’d laugh my ass off if someone had the nerve to open their mouths to tell me this nonsense to my face. Be laughing the rest of the workday.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

70% - Crypto (BTC, ETH, CRO, VET, LTC) 20% - Stocks (VANGUARD, ARKK, TESLA) 10% Cash monies

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I’m going to side with Cathie at ARKK even though her fund is down. She recently was discussing the blackrock and coinbase partnership and said she has heard directly from high ups that blackrock wants to shift 2.5% of its portfolio to btc and is waiting on more clarity in regulation. Once that comes down Cathie said Blackrock will make the move and it will more than double btc’s marketcap.

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

NOOOoooooo, please...we'll need an ARKK to get out...

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

People always brought up her stellar trading history as if she didn't get lucky during one of the greatest bull runs in history. She basically just took huge risks and they paid out for her. That's not special., anyone can do that if they're lucky. And now we're seeing exactly what the risks are - when SPY is down 14% YTD, ARKK is down **52%.**

Mentions:#SPY#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

ARKK is down well over 50% YTD as are her other funds. She isn’t tax loss harvesting because she has no capital gains. Shes cutting terrible trades at a massive loss and trying to spin it as a good thing for her mouth breather fans like you 🤣

Mentions:#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Cathie Wood of $ARKK just sold nearly 1.41 million shares of Coinbase, $COIN, at all-time lows of $53. The average cost average that $ARKK purchased $COIN at was $254.65 and she said it will go to $700 by the end of this year.

Mentions:#ARKK#COIN
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Cathie Wood One of the firm's top ETFs, the ARK Innovation ETF (NYSE:ARKK), has produced a 177% gain over the past five years as of early 2022. While that's well below its peak due to the sell-off in tech stocks, it was still ahead of the S&P 500's 106% return in the same period.

Mentions:#ARK#ARKK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

>I need what she’s smoking I assume she is smoking the cinders of what is left of the ARKK funds. I like ETH, but also don't take a word of what she says seriously.

Mentions:#ARKK#ETH
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Lmao I’m like a opposite boomer 90% Crypto - 70% BTC - 20% ETH - 10% OTHER 10% Stocks 60% Vanguard fund 30% ARKK 10% Tesla

Mentions:#BTC#ETH#ARKK