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Bloktopia

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Reddit Posts

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Inside BLOK ETF: ‘We Use the Miners to Play Offense and Defense’

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What to do with friends that don't listen?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

A look at some of the 'must watch' Metaverse projects for 2022 and how they're doing at the moment.

r/CryptoMoonShotsSee Post

Hyped Launch TODAY at 7PM UTC! Own 0.2% and Become a Shareholder for the Beach Clubs !

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

BLOK seems to have broken macro resistance and retested.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Important red flags to remember when investing!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

I invested $30k last year, and currently down $19k, looking to invest more.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

I think Bloktopia stole my BLOK stake

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Does Defi and/or developer activity influence your decision to buy crypto?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Bloktopia (BLOK) project - red flags

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Best Upcoming Metaverse Projects (That aren't Facebook!)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Best Upcoming Metaverse Projects (That aren't Facebook!)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Best Upcoming Metaverse Projects (That aren't Facebook!)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

When will this shit improve?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Top 5 Metaverse Coins Below $1 to Watch in 2022

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Tale of a scam

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Some great investments for 2022

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Looking for advice!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Am I fked?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How To Buy Bloktopia (BLOK) The Easiest Method (IOS & Android)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Please help out newbie decide which projects to choose from my list

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

My Blockchain Gaming / Metaverse Tokens Watch List:

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How To Buy Bloktopia (BLOK) The Easiest Method (IOS & Android)

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Which crypto players for the metaverse (current and future) do you know?

r/SatoshiStreetBetsSee Post

Bloktopia & BLOK (Metaverse Project)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What's the next metaverse play with high ROI left in it? Here's my research from today.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Verasity (VRA) vs. Bloktopia (BLOK) [2021]

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Unpopular opinion: no I won't buy thousands of dollars of virtual lands to be part of your club.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Potential Metaverse Token

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Update for “help little fish turn big!”

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Best metaverse investments?

r/BitcoinSee Post

NToday I took the plunge and became a crypto holder. I bought $100 of bitcoin (and paid $3 in fees). Are there any good books on cryptocurrency and trading?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Today I took the plunge and became a crypto holder. I bought $100 of bitcoin (and paid $3 in fees). Are there any good books on cryptocurrency and trading?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Technical Analysis with iChimoku Kinko Hyo - BLOK - ONE - HBAR - SOL - LTC

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

For someone who sits 12+ hours in front of the pc, which "cryptogame" would you recommend?

r/SatoshiStreetBetsSee Post

New to crypto investing, would like some direction

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Metaverse: next crypto trend?

r/CryptoMoonShotsSee Post

BLOK Analysis - runner for the week

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

$BLOK Analysis

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

I don’t know what to do with a 20% of my portfolio

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What Is Bloktopia (BLOK)? One of the Biggest Metaverse Projects

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Metaverse season is going to be huge since Mark Zuckerberg decided to invest into Metaverse.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Best Upcoming Metaverse Projects (That aren't Facebook!)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Bloktopia just announced a partnership with Travala.com, Avalanche, and Elrond in the span of two weeks.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Everything you need to know about BLOKTOPIA (BLOK) and why it will change crypto forever.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What is your two Favorite alt coins and why?

r/CryptoCurrenciesSee Post

Look at this... Bloktopia metaverse... 21 story virtual reality tower as a tribute to Bitcoin. BLOK did $100,000,000 in the first 48 hours of launch on Kucoin

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

BLOK to launch on KuCoin exchange and QuickSwap -Already taking off 🚀

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Any thoughts on owning the ETF $BLOK, which focuses on Blockchain Tech companies versus owning just $BTC itself?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Bloktopia Review: Polygon Based Decentralised Metaverse – Next 100X Project?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How to invest in crypto by investing in the stock market.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How to invest in development of crypto space

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Diversifying with Crypto stick ETFs

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Crypto trends down and crypto tech ETFs trend down with it.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Newbie question - why buy crypto directly instead of crypto ETFs?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Investing in Blockchain technology

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

My post today is about my investments into stocks where I want to get exposure to crypto and blockchain in legacy markets

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What Crypto ETF Y'all Like?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What would a Fidelity Bitcoin ETF mean for Bitcoin?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Anyone in on the crypto etf BLOK mentioned in this video? Seems decent...

Mentions

r/BitcoinSee Comment

PAXFUL SCAM COMPANY Don't using this company.. FROM 10 days trying to contact support teams but no answer. My issue is not a big issue just need verfiy phone number ( PAXFUL said need a mints to do this ) from 10 days no one back to me... Paxful trying to buy my account  but not accepted... PAXFUL CREATED A FAKE BUYER ACCOUNT TO STEEL MONEY.. ANYONE'S SENDING MONEY AND NOT RECEIVING ANYTHING MESSAGES ME TO SENDING IT TO MY LAWYER.. TRYING to HACKING my account.. AFTER THAT REPLY AND TELL ME ( HAVING SIMILAR PROBLEM) SO PAXFUL NO ABOUT HACKER'S OR PAXFUL A HACKER'S... PAXFUL DOWN BLOK MY ACCOUNT IF NOT A SCAM COMPANY PROVING THAT BY REPLY... IF NOT A SCAM.. I HAVING A PROVING THAT A PAXFUL A SCAM... ANYONE'S HAVING BALANCE IN PAXFUL SENDING OUT TO ANOTHER PLATFORM..( IF YOU CAN) HAVING A PROVE... IF PAXFUL NOT A SCAM REPLY DON'T BLOCK MY ACCOUNT...

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Kaspa, BLOK, Cone.

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I just looked up the fidelity one and it looks like I can buy it, along with BLOK. It doesn't appear to be blocked

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

KAS, TIA and if you wanna gamble BLOK and SDEX. Nfa

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

KAS if you're looking for one you might not have heard of. The others I'm in are are well known big caps except BLOK, but I'm holding that mostly because it's all profit, I think the project is great and all but I think the meta verse itself is kinda dead. The rest is your typical large caps like ada, dot, atom, BTC, eth, and a tiny bit of cro. I'm also looking for more stuff daily but it's very hard to find, especially something that hasn't pumped already.

Mentions:#KAS#BLOK#BTC
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Bitcone (CONE) Bloktopia (BLOK) Smardex (SDEX) I'm always hunting for more.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

$SOS, $TOWER, $LAMBO, $LUNC, $BLOK. And there was some coin about planting the trees or something like that I bought on PooCoin? Maybe it was $SAVE? And also I think I still got some $BTT on BitFinex. But then I also got a few of those that I bought high and are underwater, lol.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I have a separate portfolio in my tracker called 'bogged', and it contains these: * BLOK * GRT * BUNNY * LUNC * WAGMI * ONEDAO

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I'm still holding my BLOK that I got for free after I bought some early and made a good amount on. I sold 80% around the top and kept the rest. Every day it goes down more and more. Ya I think the metaverse isn't going anywhere. It's really just a game, and a shitty one at that.

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

tldr; Despite the high year-to-date returns of crypto-related ETFs, many investors are hesitant to invest in these products. For example, the Valkyrie Bitcoin Miners ETF (WGMI) has returned 196% this year and ranks fifth among all ETFs, but its assets under management remain relatively low at $21 million. Similarly, the Invesco Alerian Galaxy Crypto Economy ETF (SATO) has only attracted about $5 million in assets since its launch in October 2021, despite a year-to-date return of 151%. The largest crypto equity ETF, the Amplify Transformational Data Sharing ETF (BLOK), has also experienced net outflows of about $85 million in 2022 and has lost another $26 million in assets in 2023, despite a year-to-date return of 51%. Investors are wary of regulation and depressed cryptocurrency prices. However, if the funds continue to rally and cryptocurrency prices reach new highs, the narrative could shift and money could start pouring into these ETFs. Hopes for spot bitcoin ETFs have also affected investor interest in crypto-focused ETFs. Many investors are waiting for pure exposure to bitcoin through spot ETFs rather than investing in related ETFs. *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR. Try our free crypto chatbot at https://chat.coinfeeds.io*

Mentions:#BLOK#DYOR
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

BLOK, got in very cheap sold most. Still have a decent amount and it's free

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

KAS, BLOK to mention ones not in the comments already

Mentions:#KAS#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

BLOK. But obviously I'm biased. I made a 40x on it when I stumbled across it early. Only invest like $20 tho. Still I take it. But now I bought back all the way down so I'm barely up 😂

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

ADA, the growing TVL is solid. I also have LINK, DOT, ATOM, MATIC, CRO, and a moonshot BLOK. Don't judge me on BLOK lol. I will do some research and gamble 5% on low caps $50M-$150M.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Best trade stumbled upon BLOK and got in at about $.005, spot the top somehow at $0.16, only had a few hundred in it but damn that was nice. My best ever was actually selling $2.60 of free Robinhood stock and buying doge with it and totally forgetting I did and getting in at $0.001764 and selling at $0.29. My advice of something goes parabolic, it won't last. Sell a little bit.

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I'm already invested in BLOK which is an etf for blockchain. Lol. Low/No risk to balance out some of my degen plays. 😂

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

There's def ppl that will feel more comfortable getting into btc through an etf than buying directly. I personally hold BLOK which is an ETF for blockchain. I'm happy w/ how that's been going. But I actually do believe in the tech, unlike 1/2 you degens 😂

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Stocks/investments like MSTR, COIN, etc? How would that be any different from existing ETFs? CRYP, BLOK, BITQ etc

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is a ETF con-argument written by Maleficent_Plankton. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? Check out the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find submissions for other topics.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

tldr; The managers of Amplify Investments’ Transformational Data Sharing ETF (BLOK) have increased their positions in bitcoin miners after the fund's allocation to such companies hit an all-time low at the end of 2022. BLOK now has roughly 21% of its assets in mining companies, with Riot Platforms as its top holding in the mining space. The fund's allocation to miners peaked at roughly 30% in October 2021. BLOK has also added to its position in Canada-based Hive Blockchain Technologies and Nu Holdings, the parent company of Brazilian fintech bank Nubank, as well as internet retailer Overstock.com. *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*

Mentions:#BLOK#DYOR
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I thought BLOK looked cool and they were extremely active for a while. Idk what happened though, their Twitter is dead now. Glad I don't hold a lot.

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I regret investing in BLOKTOPIA (BLOK), I bought it at $0.1 and now the price is $0.0025 (a bad luck), but I still hold and hope for a miracle that makes BLOK can recover and increase again, because I see the project is still have progress and the team is still active on disc*rd.

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Think I hit this point as well, unless we see a major dip. Shifting focus to adding to some Etf': SOXX (semiconductors), BLOK (blockchain) & UBOT (Ai). As well as adding to $Atos since they have a solid history of going sub $1 to over $5 over & over. Made some spare change w/ them several times. Probably scoop some more $MNMD too since I support their work w/ Ibogaine.

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

BLOK, it had some crazy gains at first it went from .005 to .17 lol. Yes I sold very quickly with those gains, then I lost it in Yokaiswap lmfao

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

BLOK, Algo and ETH. It’s why I still hold and trade them.

Mentions:#BLOK#ETH
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I do have a tiny bag of BLOK. It seems ok and the team is working hard and lots of partnerships. But who knows.

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/10z6vqg/daily_general_discussion_february_11_2023_gmt0/).

Mentions:#SPY#DLT#BLOK
r/CryptoMarketsSee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/10xfaxf/daily_general_discussion_february_9_2023_gmt0/).

Mentions:#SPY#DLT#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Held my BLOK stack all the way to a value of around 10k and all the way down to a value of $300. :)

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/10vmhhb/daily_general_discussion_february_7_2023_gmt0/).

Mentions:#SPY#DLT#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Used MEXC to buy BLOK, haven't check the price on that in a while

Mentions:#BLOK
r/BitcoinSee Comment

BLOK is a bitcoin ETF I own.

Mentions:#BLOK
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/10af5f6/daily_general_discussion_january_13_2023_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/109k9wk/daily_general_discussion_january_12_2023_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/109k9wk/daily_general_discussion_january_12_2023_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/109k9wk/daily_general_discussion_january_12_2023_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/109k9wk/daily_general_discussion_january_12_2023_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I've been away 9 months, can someone fill me in on what has happened to the Metaverse coin sector in that time? I own ALICE, BLOK, and TLM along with a bunch of main coins and I noticed Metaverse is down significantly more or maybe it's just I bought near the peak... I'm assuming the hype about the Metaverse and Meta/Zuckerberg went away so the whole sector has tanked? I read Zuckerberg spent $15 bill.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/zpcbey/daily_general_discussion_december_19_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/zjfh30/daily_general_discussion_december_12_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest Archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/zi7uwk/daily_general_discussion_december_11_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z9k3aj/monthly_optimists_discussion_december_2022/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

#ETF Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by Maleficent_Plankton which won 1st place in the ETF Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > This is topic is a bit vague because it doesn't specify whether we're discussing ETFs in general, or crypto ETFs. So I'm dividing my response in 2 parts. > > --------------- > > **ETFs in General**: > > ETFs are bundled funds of many invidual stocks that can be traded as if they were a single stock. There are many different types of ETFs, and they can be active (e.g ARKK, MOON) or passive (e.g. VTI, SPY, VOO). Index ETFs follow index markets and are a simple way for basic investors to buy the equivalent of a bucket of large numbers of stocks without having the complexity of managing each one separately. > > Cons: > > * ETFs have much lower returns than crypto, historically-speaking > * ETFs have management fees that typically range from 0% to 0.5%. Some actively-managed ETFs can go up to 1-2% management fees. > * You cannot directly purchase crypto using ETFs > * ETFs are a boring investments that are no longer technologically innovative. It doesn't make for an exciting conversation. > > --------------- > > **Crypto ETFs** > > There are 3 main categories of crypto ETFs and derivatives: > > * ETFs that invest in DLT/blockchain or mining companies > * Crypto future ETFs > * Crypto trusts, which aren't ETFs but behave similarly > > Cons: > > * There is currently no direct investment in crypto in the US. (Canada has 4 crypto ETFs). Instead, you can buy ETFs in blockchain or mining companies, crypto future ETFs, and crypto trusts. > * Cipherpunks might not like that ETFs are centralized securities controlled by traditional financial organizations > * For Crypto future ETFs still don't exist yet, and we're still [waiting for SEC approval](https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2021/08/05/invesco-files-with-sec-for-bitcoin-strategy-etf/). > * Many of the ETFs that invest in DLT/Blockchain technology companies have a small market cap. The biggest 4 are: BLOK (1.2 B), BLCN (290 M), LEGR (120 M), BITQ (77 M). > * Most of these ETFs that invest in companies have doubled in price in 2-3 years, which is nowhere near the 1000% plus gains from crypto. > * Bitcoin and Ethereum Trusts (Grayscale Ethereum Trust, Grayscale Bitcoin Trust) are Trusts based in Canada, so US investors would need to buy them on over the counter markets. They're an indirect investment in the sense that you're holding a trust, that holds cryptocoins. There are inefficiencies and rebalancing, so you pay a premium for the coins. There's also a high management fee of 2%. > * If you don't want the hassle securing your own coins, why would you want to use an inefficient Grayscale trust with 2% fees and a premium when you can buy crypto on other traditional centralized institutions like PayPal and Robinhood for 1/4 of the fees of Coinbase (non-Pro)? > * You don't get staking or voting rights. > * Most smaller altcoins will never be supported in the future. If you're really interested in a single cryptocoin, an ETF is not the way to invest in that specific coin. > * It's almost certain that no privacy coins will ever be supported > > **Crypto Indexes**: > > * There are also crypto indexes (e.g. Crypto20, DeFi Pulse Index), which are DeFi derivatives similar to stock ETFs > * None of these are as efficient as holding onto their underlying assets due to administration and network fees from periodic rebalancing ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoqsv/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_etf_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_ETF) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z97v8h/daily_general_discussion_december_1_2022_gmt0/).

r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment