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r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Using KYC goes against everything that crypto stands for.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Russian Millionaire's Startup Plans Ruble Stablecoin Following DAI Model

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Russian Millionaire’s Startup Plans Ruble Stablecoin Following DAI Model

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Are there any anonymous IOS wallets like Cake that support USDT / USDC / DAI?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The strategies I’ve been using this bear market: Yield Farming, Liquidity Mining (and Their Risks)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Creating a USDC 20 crypto wallet as a raffle prize. What is the minimal amount of gas I should prefill it with?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Breaking News: Coinbase Looking To Acquire $1.6B of MakerDAO’s USDC

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

New BOND and Barnbridge v2: a spectacular update to the most promising DeFi project

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Coinbase to MakerDAO (DAI): You should let us manage 1/3 of the funds you use to maintain the $1 peg!

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

How to Buy Bitcoin in India

r/BitcoinSee Post

Earn DAI Token Automatically

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Crypto protects you against quantitative easing

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

If you’re feeling nostalgic for UST/LUNA 19.5% APR then here’s the next best thing,

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Justin Sun: Why TRON-Powered Stablecoin $USDD Is Better Than ‘DAI, UST, and Other Stablecoins’

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What not to do/do during the Merge if there is a fork

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Good ways to earn interest on your holdings?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

New token on Polygon with high volatility, a gem for both traders and Hodlers

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

New token on Polygon with high volatility, a gem for both day trader and hodlers ?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

MakerDAO Opens $100M DAI Loan to Huntingdon Valley Bank

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

No, Ethereum is not going to fork. No, stablecoins don't have to pick a side. And no, DeFi would not implode if USDC were to cease operations.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Will DAI somehow retain peg on a forked chain post-merge?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Can anybody estimate reasonably how resilient are the various stablecoins to price crashes?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Should we worry about stablecoins after Terra crash? what are the risks of stablecoins?

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Through its Yield-Capturing Power, Origin Protocol Backs 28 Million OUSD with DAI — +58% of all its Circulating Supply.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Tipping with Ether instead of Moons

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Tipping with Ether instead of Moons

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Maker DAO Founder considers seriously moving the DAI stablecoin away from USDC cryptocurrency

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

MakerDAO Proposed to De-Peg DAI and Dump 3.5B USDC

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

MakerDAO Proposed to De-Peg DAI and Dump 3.5B USDC

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Folks, we're in an Altseason!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Low Risk Place to Lend stablecoins? (in light of Celsius)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Ethereum Merge draws closer; DAI dollar depeg proposed by Maker founder

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

MakerDAO founder says it's 'almost inevitable' DAI will abandon USD peg

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Polkadot Cross-Chain Bridge

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Initiative - Trade trash for crypto

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

MakerDAO May Execute ‘Emergency Shutdown’ If Sanctions Hit DAI

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Blockchain.com does not pay my 1 500 000 DAI and 500 000 USDT

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Blockchain.com does not pay my 1 500 000 DAI and 500 000 USDT

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Blockchain.com does not pay my 1 500 000 DAI and 500 000 USDT

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Technical Analysis: An algorithmic instrument that produces a low volatility asset for managing risk.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Could algorithmic instruments produce a low volatility asset for managing risk?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Terra’s crash could make people stay away from many stablecoins, but this couldn't be further from the truth.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Yield Aggregator "Reaper Farm's" Multi-Strategy Vault got Hacked. The Hacker has Already Laundered ~1.6M $DAI and 32 $ETH through Tornado Cash.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The hacker who stole $3.5m from the NIRVANA protocol is close to being identified

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

USDC officially at #4 by marketcap, 1 spot behind USDT! USDC's price has to rise to $1.21 to win the race with USDT, so let's pump it!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Helio Protocol

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Société Générale, plans to borrow $30 million in DAI from Maker DAO

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Any idea what’s going on with Stable Coins on CB? Only shows DAI… where’s USDT/USDC and the others?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

And Coinbase brings back Stellar Lumen rewards at 4% for the Coinbase Card. What an unexpected outcome.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The current highest yield for stable coin staking at 9.62% APY

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Looks like Coinbase will be discontinuing the Coinbase Card rewards. Tis’ a sad day to crypto.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Stablecoin Dominance 8 Jul 2022: USDT 44.15%, USDC 37.29%, BUSD 11.95%, DAI 4.3%

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Stablecoin Dominance 8 Jul 2022: USDT 44.15%, USDC 37.29%, BUSD 11.95%, DAI 4.3%

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Celsius have closed their Maker Vault and are about to dump 22k BTC (500m USD) on the market

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Cefi lending platforms have proven to be unreliable and risky. Is there a legit (but not risk-free) way to gain % APY on your cryptocurrencies? I present you my case.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Celsius pays down 143M in DAI loans since July 1

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Celsius Repays $120 Million Worth of DAI to Maker Within 24 Hours

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Celsius Network (CEL) paid off about $143 million towards its Bitcoin loan.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The only cryptos with more ON CHAIN volume than HEX are ETH, BTC, USDC and DAI. it's one of the most transparent cryptocurrency there is. because no fake volumes with trading on exchanges.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Hedge funds sell Short Tether (USDT) for profit

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

CeFi Sucks

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Synthetix' assets failure scenarios

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Using crypto to flee an abusive relationship, advice needed

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Which is safest USDC, BUSD or DAI?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What is the point of sidechains?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Metamask to Coinbase

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Can't withdraw Stasis EURS from YouHodler

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What is Helio Protocol

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Will these DeFi platforms still be a thing for about 3 years from now?

r/CryptoMoonShotsSee Post

CoreBNB - Hyper definition Innovative Staking! $CBN - %99 of tokens on Liquidity Pool and Locked for 3 years. Stealth launch Today 18:00 UTC - BSC Token

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

insider info on how Tether is gonna pass a full audit (100069% legit)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Help me trust my stablecoins

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Celsius Repays Compound Finance $10m Worth of DAI

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Celsius Repays $10M DAI to Compound

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

USDT needs to go.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

MakerDAO Temporarily Halts DAI Deposits on AAVE

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

I stake most of my USDT, it is better to stake it as USDT or USDC or DAI ?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

MakerDAO Pauses DAI Deposits, Cites Adverse Market Conditions

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Here is what CeIsius is currently doing with their customers' money.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Here is what Celsius is currently doing with their customers' money.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Some possible scenarios which could take crypto far below $20k

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Some possible scenarios which could take BTC far below $20k

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

MakerDAO Cuts Off Its AAVE-DAI Direct Deposit Module

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

MakerDAO Votes to Disable Aave DAI Supply, Reducing Celsius Exposure - Decrypt

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Crypto market right now compared to the 90s/2000s ".com bubble"...

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

14 Months Later, Fundamentals Is Still King

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

USDD is closer to a an overcollateralized stablecoin DAI rather than one of these fully unbacked degen coins like UST or Iron Bank

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

USDD is closer to a an overcollateralized stablecoin DAI rather than one of these fully unbacked degen coins like UST or Iron Bank

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

USDD is nowhere near UST's risk level. It is closer to DAI than a degenerate fully algo stable

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

A look on stablecoins fully collateralized by physical deposits: e-Money!

r/CryptoMoonShotsSee Post

UtopiaP2P- Everything you may dream of in terms of privacy, storage, communication, payment security, and cryptocurrency betterment

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

The journey of a DeFi enthusiast. What do you think of this?

r/CryptoCurrenciesSee Post

Celsius Network Struggles To Stay Afloat With Mounting DAI Debt As Bitcoin Price Drop Threatens Heavy Liquidation

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

In your opinion, which stablecoin feels safer during this market?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Please donate 0.0018 BNB for gas fees?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

I have along with a small minority telling people for years the concept of Algo stables are completly flawed. Ampleforth that takes an antifragile approach is the only true decentralized unit of account that is conceptually sound.

r/SatoshiStreetBetsSee Post

Cosmic Universe | P2E Game | MMORPG | Yield Farming | Character & Land plot NFTs | 1,5m MC GEM | Real utility tokens | Launching to Harmony with cross-chain plans in future

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Importance of Stablecoins in Global Payment

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

A quick write-up on the new Ethereum/Tezos bridge.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

USDD misleading collateral

Mentions

The big innovation with Railgun is that the smart contract can talk to other smart contracts, meaning you can do private DeFi with your private balance. This amplifies the privacy you get vs another privacy project with similar TVL as each DeFi interaction decreases the likelihood a deposit can be linked to a withdrawal as there is more transaction "noise". As such, it's not really a mixer per se as there is more utility and thinking behind the protocol design and is more aimed at private DeFi vs simply hiding the origin of funds. If you stick to common assets like USDC, DAI or ETH, you would also be pretty well anonymised. Obviously, if you're the only person to shield ObamaInuSonicChan then the heuristics are pretty easy to break.

Mentions:#USDC#DAI#ETH

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xu3vcu\/daily_general_discussion_october_3_2022_gmt0/).

#USDC Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by ExchangeEnough7821 which won 2nd place in the USDC Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > **What is USD coin (USDC)?** > USD coin is a stablecoin, first announced in May 2018. It is developed by the Circle Consortium - a partnership between the company Circle and the exchange Coinbase. Circle and Coinbase are responsible for issuing the USD coin, and Centre develops the technology behind and the framework of it. Circle is a company founded in 2013 by Jeremy Allaire and Sean Neville, and is an official Money Transmitter – it must comply with federal law and regulations. Now, it has over 60 partners and is continuing to expand. > Uses of USD coin: > • Avoid inflation in countries with weak economies > • Send money around the world without large fees, securely and instantly > • Short other coins without having to convert to fiat > • Buys things in crypto based apps and websites > > > **Cons of USD coin** : > • Although the cost of transferring USD coin may be less than if it were fiat, when the Ethereum network is congested it can get very expensive to transfer even a small amount > > • Although USD coin can be use in some DeFi apps and games, there are very few day-to-day uses for USDC – there is almost no shops, restaurants or companies that will accept it in everyday circumstances, reducing its usability > > • Staking USDC can be risky compared to holding fiat in a bank – banks have FDIC insurance and your money is almost guaranteed to be safe, albeit with a lower interest rate, but there are many examples of DeFi apps that have been hacked with funds drained so your money is in more danger > > • Another issue that may put people off from USD coin is that it is centralised – it is governed by Circle, so it the reserves cannot be verified, unlike decentralised options like DAI and SameUSD > > • Although transferrin USD coin is very fast, certain fiat services -most notably PayPal – have even shorter transfer times, sometimes 1 second or less > > • Even though crypto is getting more mainstream with simpler apps, it can be difficult for many to understand how to use and stake this coin to achieve its full potential, and if it is held in private wallets and the seed key is forgotten there is nothing anyone can do to retrieve the funds, unlike apps like PayPal > > \*”What is USD coin” and “Uses of USD coin” is copied between both of my USD pros, and USD cons, but I wrote it myself\* ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2moj/top_10_usd_coin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_USD_Coin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xta3ma/daily_general_discussion_october_2_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#USDC#DAI

#Terra Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by idevcg which won 3rd place in the Terra Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > Terra Luna's UST has surpassed makerDAO's DAI as the largest (by marketcap) algorithmic stablecoin, despite the fact that DAI has been around for much longer. > > Do Kwon, Terra's founder has recently announced that Terra plans to buy [11 billion dollars worth of bitcoin](https://cryptosnewss.com/terra-ust-buys-125-million-worth-of-btc-out-of-11-2-billion-planned-to-acquire-in-three-month-period/) in the next 3 months, to further diversify the backing of UST to make sure that UST can continue to maintain it's peg to the USD. > > The Anchor protocol, which is an essential part of the Terra ecosystem, offers an unprecedented 19.5-20.5% APR on UST. It has run smoothly for over a year without any problems, unlike many other stablecoins promising high returns but ended up rugpulling. > > [According to Electric Capital](https://youtu.be/_ZKsunlK7sA?t=4628), from December 2020 to December 2021, Terra is no.1 in the fastest growing ecosystems, in terms of growth of full time developers, at 313%. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mwy/top_10_terra_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive##wiki_terra.28luna.29) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Mentions:#DAI

#Terra Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by idevcg which won 3rd place in the Terra Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > Terra Luna's UST has surpassed makerDAO's DAI as the largest (by marketcap) algorithmic stablecoin, despite the fact that DAI has been around for much longer. > > Do Kwon, Terra's founder has recently announced that Terra plans to buy [11 billion dollars worth of bitcoin](https://cryptosnewss.com/terra-ust-buys-125-million-worth-of-btc-out-of-11-2-billion-planned-to-acquire-in-three-month-period/) in the next 3 months, to further diversify the backing of UST to make sure that UST can continue to maintain it's peg to the USD. > > The Anchor protocol, which is an essential part of the Terra ecosystem, offers an unprecedented 19.5-20.5% APR on UST. It has run smoothly for over a year without any problems, unlike many other stablecoins promising high returns but ended up rugpulling. > > [According to Electric Capital](https://youtu.be/_ZKsunlK7sA?t=4628), from December 2020 to December 2021, Terra is no.1 in the fastest growing ecosystems, in terms of growth of full time developers, at 313%. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mwy/top_10_terra_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive##wiki_terra.28luna.29) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Mentions:#DAI

#USDC Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Blendzi0r which won 1st place in the USDC Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > First published on: [30.09.2021](https://www.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og2jo1/comment/hewg10a/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3) > > Last edited on: 31.03.2021 > > # Intro > > USD Coin (USDC) is a digital dollar – a stablecoin pegged to US dollar. Stablecoins are a type of cryptocurrency with a value fixed to other assets (usually assets outside of the cryptocurrency space, e.g. fiat currencies, precious metals, etc.). Their main purposes are: 1) help investors escape the volatility of the cryptocurrency market and 2) allow investors to buy cryptocurrencies on exchanges that do not offer fiat deposits. USDC is currently the second largest stablecoin. ^(\[1\], \[2\], \[3\]) > > # Pros > > **It’s backed mostly by cash and cash equivalents** > > It must be admitted that Tether has improved its reserves a lot since their first report and their latest breakdown looks much better as USDT is now backed by cash and cash equivalents in around 85%, but USDC is still ahead as its **reserves are backed by cash and cash equivalents in 92%**. There are also many more questions in regards to the credibility of Tether’s reports. ^(\[4\], \[5\]) And USDC may soon leave Tether far behind as Circle, the company that issues and backs USDC, stated that it wants the reserves to consist only of cash, cash equivalents and U.S. Treasury bonds in the near future. ^(\[6\]) > > What the stablecoin reserves consist of is extremely important for liquidity. If a lot of people decided to cash out at the same time and there was no liquidity it could end in a disaster for the whole market. > > ​ > > **It’s partnered with Coinbase, Visa and others** > > Circle has partnered with Coinbase and together they founded a consortium named Centre that governs USDC. Circle has also partnered with banking institutions, including Signature Bank and Visa. The companies that invested in Circle include **Goldman Sachs**, Digital Currency Group (**Grayscale** Investments), **Fidelity** and **FTX**. > > It is also worth mentioning that Circle wants to follow in the footsteps of their partners (Coinbase) and also become a publicly traded company, which would add even more credibility to USDC. ^(\[7\]) > > ​ > > **It’s transparent** > > USDC is transparent in terms of its financial operations. It follows the US laws closely. It is also **audited by Grant Thornton, LLP every month** and monthly reports can be found on the [Centre Consortium’s website](https://www.centre.io/usdc-transparency). The reports, of course, include information on USDC reserves. > > ​ > > **It’s growing rapidly** > > At the beginning of the year, USDT had a 5 times bigger market cap than USDC ($20B vs. $4B). In March2021, this difference is much smaller and USDC has almsot 2/3 of the USDT's amrket cap. One can argue that this difference is still significant but be aware that **between April 2021 and April 2022 market cap of USDC grew by 400% while Tether’s market cap grew by 100%.** > > Also, while USDT’s daily volume decreased, USDC’s volume is on a rise. > > ​ > > **Coinsmart replaces Tether with USDC** > > On September 15, 2021, Coinsmart, Canadian cryptocurrency exchange, delisted USDT and adopted USDC instead ^(\[8\]). As regulators take a closer look at stablecoins, this trend might continue and **more entities might drop Tether in favor of a more transparent stablecoins.** > > ​ > > **USDC is centralized. But is it so bad in the case of a stablecoin?** > > Those who criticize USDC and other centralized stablecoins often give the example of DAI which in their opinion is decentralized. There is no question about USDC being dependent on Centre, but it must be said that DAI, on the other hand, is heavily dependent on USDC - more than half of DAI is generated by USDC collateral and collateralizetion against Centre’s stablecoin is more than 25%. ^(\[10\]) > > Decentralization is essential for cryptocurrency. But so is replacing fiat. So, is decentralization that important in the case of a stablecoin anyway? > > \_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_ > > **^(Sources:)** > > ^(\[1\]) [^(https://f.hubspotusercontent30.net/hubfs/9304636/PDF/centre-whitepaper.pdf)](https://f.hubspotusercontent30.net/hubfs/9304636/PDF/centre-whitepaper.pdf) > > ^(\[2\]) [^(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USD\\Coin)](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USD\Coin) > > ^(\[3\]) [^(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stablecoin)](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stablecoin) > > ^(\[4\]) [^(https://www.centre.io/hubfs/pdfs/attestation/2021%20Circle%20Examination%20Report%20August%202021%20Final.pdf?hsLang=en)](https://www.centre.io/hubfs/pdfs/attestation/2021%20Circle%20Examination%20Report%20August%202021%20Final.pdf?hsLang=en) > > ^(\[5\]) [^(https://tether.to/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/tether\\assuranceconsolidated\_reserves\_report\_2021-06-30.pdf)](https://tether.to/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/tether\assuranceconsolidated_reserves_report_2021-06-30.pdf) > > ^(\[6\]) [^(https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/23/crypto-usdc-stablecoin-to-change-reserves-composition.html)](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/23/crypto-usdc-stablecoin-to-change-reserves-composition.html) > > ^(\[7\]) [^(https://fortune.com/2021/05/28/crypto-startup-circle-fidelity-ftx-stablecoin-usdc-coinbase-funding-spac/)](https://fortune.com/2021/05/28/crypto-startup-circle-fidelity-ftx-stablecoin-usdc-coinbase-funding-spac/) > > ^(\[8\]) [^(https://nitter.net/CoinSmart/status/1433472681626722309)](https://twitter.com/CoinSmart/status/1433472681626722309) > > ^(\[9\]) [^(https://www.coinsmart.com/blog/what-is-usdc/)](https://www.coinsmart.com/blog/what-is-usdc/) > > ^(\[10\]) [^(https://daistats.com/#/)](https://daistats.com/#/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mln/top_10_usd_coin_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_USD_Coin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#USDC Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by Blendzi0r which won 1st place in the USDC Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > First published on: [30.09.2021](https://www.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og2jo1/comment/hewg10a/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3) > > Last edited on: 31.03.2021 > > # Intro > > USD Coin (USDC) is a digital dollar – a stablecoin pegged to US dollar. Stablecoins are a type of cryptocurrency with a value fixed to other assets (usually assets outside of the cryptocurrency space, e.g. fiat currencies, precious metals, etc.). Their main purposes are: 1) help investors escape the volatility of the cryptocurrency market and 2) allow investors to buy cryptocurrencies on exchanges that do not offer fiat deposits. USDC is currently the second largest stablecoin. ^(\[1\], \[2\], \[3\]) > > # Pros > > **It’s backed mostly by cash and cash equivalents** > > It must be admitted that Tether has improved its reserves a lot since their first report and their latest breakdown looks much better as USDT is now backed by cash and cash equivalents in around 85%, but USDC is still ahead as its **reserves are backed by cash and cash equivalents in 92%**. There are also many more questions in regards to the credibility of Tether’s reports. ^(\[4\], \[5\]) And USDC may soon leave Tether far behind as Circle, the company that issues and backs USDC, stated that it wants the reserves to consist only of cash, cash equivalents and U.S. Treasury bonds in the near future. ^(\[6\]) > > What the stablecoin reserves consist of is extremely important for liquidity. If a lot of people decided to cash out at the same time and there was no liquidity it could end in a disaster for the whole market. > > ​ > > **It’s partnered with Coinbase, Visa and others** > > Circle has partnered with Coinbase and together they founded a consortium named Centre that governs USDC. Circle has also partnered with banking institutions, including Signature Bank and Visa. The companies that invested in Circle include **Goldman Sachs**, Digital Currency Group (**Grayscale** Investments), **Fidelity** and **FTX**. > > It is also worth mentioning that Circle wants to follow in the footsteps of their partners (Coinbase) and also become a publicly traded company, which would add even more credibility to USDC. ^(\[7\]) > > ​ > > **It’s transparent** > > USDC is transparent in terms of its financial operations. It follows the US laws closely. It is also **audited by Grant Thornton, LLP every month** and monthly reports can be found on the [Centre Consortium’s website](https://www.centre.io/usdc-transparency). The reports, of course, include information on USDC reserves. > > ​ > > **It’s growing rapidly** > > At the beginning of the year, USDT had a 5 times bigger market cap than USDC ($20B vs. $4B). In March2021, this difference is much smaller and USDC has almsot 2/3 of the USDT's amrket cap. One can argue that this difference is still significant but be aware that **between April 2021 and April 2022 market cap of USDC grew by 400% while Tether’s market cap grew by 100%.** > > Also, while USDT’s daily volume decreased, USDC’s volume is on a rise. > > ​ > > **Coinsmart replaces Tether with USDC** > > On September 15, 2021, Coinsmart, Canadian cryptocurrency exchange, delisted USDT and adopted USDC instead ^(\[8\]). As regulators take a closer look at stablecoins, this trend might continue and **more entities might drop Tether in favor of a more transparent stablecoins.** > > ​ > > **USDC is centralized. But is it so bad in the case of a stablecoin?** > > Those who criticize USDC and other centralized stablecoins often give the example of DAI which in their opinion is decentralized. There is no question about USDC being dependent on Centre, but it must be said that DAI, on the other hand, is heavily dependent on USDC - more than half of DAI is generated by USDC collateral and collateralizetion against Centre’s stablecoin is more than 25%. ^(\[10\]) > > Decentralization is essential for cryptocurrency. But so is replacing fiat. So, is decentralization that important in the case of a stablecoin anyway? > > \_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_ > > **^(Sources:)** > > ^(\[1\]) [^(https://f.hubspotusercontent30.net/hubfs/9304636/PDF/centre-whitepaper.pdf)](https://f.hubspotusercontent30.net/hubfs/9304636/PDF/centre-whitepaper.pdf) > > ^(\[2\]) [^(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USD\\Coin)](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USD\Coin) > > ^(\[3\]) [^(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stablecoin)](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stablecoin) > > ^(\[4\]) [^(https://www.centre.io/hubfs/pdfs/attestation/2021%20Circle%20Examination%20Report%20August%202021%20Final.pdf?hsLang=en)](https://www.centre.io/hubfs/pdfs/attestation/2021%20Circle%20Examination%20Report%20August%202021%20Final.pdf?hsLang=en) > > ^(\[5\]) [^(https://tether.to/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/tether\\assuranceconsolidated\_reserves\_report\_2021-06-30.pdf)](https://tether.to/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/tether\assuranceconsolidated_reserves_report_2021-06-30.pdf) > > ^(\[6\]) [^(https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/23/crypto-usdc-stablecoin-to-change-reserves-composition.html)](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/23/crypto-usdc-stablecoin-to-change-reserves-composition.html) > > ^(\[7\]) [^(https://fortune.com/2021/05/28/crypto-startup-circle-fidelity-ftx-stablecoin-usdc-coinbase-funding-spac/)](https://fortune.com/2021/05/28/crypto-startup-circle-fidelity-ftx-stablecoin-usdc-coinbase-funding-spac/) > > ^(\[8\]) [^(https://nitter.net/CoinSmart/status/1433472681626722309)](https://twitter.com/CoinSmart/status/1433472681626722309) > > ^(\[9\]) [^(https://www.coinsmart.com/blog/what-is-usdc/)](https://www.coinsmart.com/blog/what-is-usdc/) > > ^(\[10\]) [^(https://daistats.com/#/)](https://daistats.com/#/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mln/top_10_usd_coin_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_USD_Coin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#Terra Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by idevcg which won 3rd place in the Terra Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > Terra Luna's UST has surpassed makerDAO's DAI as the largest (by marketcap) algorithmic stablecoin, despite the fact that DAI has been around for much longer. > > Do Kwon, Terra's founder has recently announced that Terra plans to buy [11 billion dollars worth of bitcoin](https://cryptosnewss.com/terra-ust-buys-125-million-worth-of-btc-out-of-11-2-billion-planned-to-acquire-in-three-month-period/) in the next 3 months, to further diversify the backing of UST to make sure that UST can continue to maintain it's peg to the USD. > > The Anchor protocol, which is an essential part of the Terra ecosystem, offers an unprecedented 19.5-20.5% APR on UST. It has run smoothly for over a year without any problems, unlike many other stablecoins promising high returns but ended up rugpulling. > > [According to Electric Capital](https://youtu.be/_ZKsunlK7sA?t=4628), from December 2020 to December 2021, Terra is no.1 in the fastest growing ecosystems, in terms of growth of full time developers, at 313%. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mwy/top_10_terra_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive##wiki_terra.28luna.29) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Mentions:#DAI

#USDC Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by ExchangeEnough7821 which won 2nd place in the USDC Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > **What is USD coin (USDC)?** > USD coin is a stablecoin, first announced in May 2018. It is developed by the Circle Consortium - a partnership between the company Circle and the exchange Coinbase. Circle and Coinbase are responsible for issuing the USD coin, and Centre develops the technology behind and the framework of it. Circle is a company founded in 2013 by Jeremy Allaire and Sean Neville, and is an official Money Transmitter – it must comply with federal law and regulations. Now, it has over 60 partners and is continuing to expand. > Uses of USD coin: > • Avoid inflation in countries with weak economies > • Send money around the world without large fees, securely and instantly > • Short other coins without having to convert to fiat > • Buys things in crypto based apps and websites > > > **Cons of USD coin** : > • Although the cost of transferring USD coin may be less than if it were fiat, when the Ethereum network is congested it can get very expensive to transfer even a small amount > > • Although USD coin can be use in some DeFi apps and games, there are very few day-to-day uses for USDC – there is almost no shops, restaurants or companies that will accept it in everyday circumstances, reducing its usability > > • Staking USDC can be risky compared to holding fiat in a bank – banks have FDIC insurance and your money is almost guaranteed to be safe, albeit with a lower interest rate, but there are many examples of DeFi apps that have been hacked with funds drained so your money is in more danger > > • Another issue that may put people off from USD coin is that it is centralised – it is governed by Circle, so it the reserves cannot be verified, unlike decentralised options like DAI and SameUSD > > • Although transferrin USD coin is very fast, certain fiat services -most notably PayPal – have even shorter transfer times, sometimes 1 second or less > > • Even though crypto is getting more mainstream with simpler apps, it can be difficult for many to understand how to use and stake this coin to achieve its full potential, and if it is held in private wallets and the seed key is forgotten there is nothing anyone can do to retrieve the funds, unlike apps like PayPal > > \*”What is USD coin” and “Uses of USD coin” is copied between both of my USD pros, and USD cons, but I wrote it myself\* ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2moj/top_10_usd_coin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_USD_Coin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xta3ma/daily_general_discussion_october_2_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#USDC#DAI

#USDC Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by I-play-too-much-PUBG which won 3rd place in the USDC Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > USDC is the best stablecoin and here is why. > > > > > > > 1. USDC is transparent. Nothing is hidden in USDC due to its publicly verifiable attestations. This means it is much harder for criminal activity such as money laundering to occur. > > > > > 2. USDC is safe. USDC is backed by (debatably) the strongest economy in the world unlike some other stablecoins such as BUSD or DAI. USDC is only truly comparable to other US dollar backed coins such as USDT. > > > > > With that argument someone might say that USDT is also backed by the US dollar. With that, I follow with another argument. > > > > > 3. Due to the transparency and security of USDC, there is little to no “fairy money” or creation of cryptocurrency without being backed by anything. This is the strongest reason why USDC is superior to USDT. > > > > > > > 4. Although USDC is backed by the US dollar (centralized) it actually supports defi. USDC is an ERC-20 based token therefore it can be used by any dApp built on the ethereum network. > > > > > > In conclusion, USDT is currently used more and has a higher market cap than USDC, but USDC has stronger infrastructure and is more likely to be used largely in the future due to it being in support of defi. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mln/top_10_usd_coin_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_USD_Coin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#Terra Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by idevcg which won 3rd place in the Terra Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > Terra Luna's UST has surpassed makerDAO's DAI as the largest (by marketcap) algorithmic stablecoin, despite the fact that DAI has been around for much longer. > > Do Kwon, Terra's founder has recently announced that Terra plans to buy [11 billion dollars worth of bitcoin](https://cryptosnewss.com/terra-ust-buys-125-million-worth-of-btc-out-of-11-2-billion-planned-to-acquire-in-three-month-period/) in the next 3 months, to further diversify the backing of UST to make sure that UST can continue to maintain it's peg to the USD. > > The Anchor protocol, which is an essential part of the Terra ecosystem, offers an unprecedented 19.5-20.5% APR on UST. It has run smoothly for over a year without any problems, unlike many other stablecoins promising high returns but ended up rugpulling. > > [According to Electric Capital](https://youtu.be/_ZKsunlK7sA?t=4628), from December 2020 to December 2021, Terra is no.1 in the fastest growing ecosystems, in terms of growth of full time developers, at 313%. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mwy/top_10_terra_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive##wiki_terra.28luna.29) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Mentions:#DAI

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xta3ma/daily_general_discussion_october_2_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xsqkga/monthly_optimists_discussion_october_2022/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xsqkga/monthly_optimists_discussion_october_2022/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xsqkga/monthly_optimists_discussion_october_2022/).

Good suggestion. I will add DAI to the poster.

Mentions:#DAI

#USDC Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by I-play-too-much-PUBG which won 3rd place in the USDC Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > USDC is the best stablecoin and here is why. > > > > > > > 1. USDC is transparent. Nothing is hidden in USDC due to its publicly verifiable attestations. This means it is much harder for criminal activity such as money laundering to occur. > > > > > 2. USDC is safe. USDC is backed by (debatably) the strongest economy in the world unlike some other stablecoins such as BUSD or DAI. USDC is only truly comparable to other US dollar backed coins such as USDT. > > > > > With that argument someone might say that USDT is also backed by the US dollar. With that, I follow with another argument. > > > > > 3. Due to the transparency and security of USDC, there is little to no “fairy money” or creation of cryptocurrency without being backed by anything. This is the strongest reason why USDC is superior to USDT. > > > > > > > 4. Although USDC is backed by the US dollar (centralized) it actually supports defi. USDC is an ERC-20 based token therefore it can be used by any dApp built on the ethereum network. > > > > > > In conclusion, USDT is currently used more and has a higher market cap than USDC, but USDC has stronger infrastructure and is more likely to be used largely in the future due to it being in support of defi. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mln/top_10_usd_coin_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_USD_Coin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xsqkga/monthly_optimists_discussion_october_2022/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xsqkga/monthly_optimists_discussion_october_2022/).

That is still a taxable event. I know this right now because I was going through this this week with an accountant. Had to determine DAI transactions to XLM, etc.

Mentions:#DAI#XLM

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xsglev/daily_general_discussion_october_1_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xrmvqr/daily_general_discussion_september_30_2022_gmt0/).

#Terra Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by idevcg which won 3rd place in the Terra Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > Terra Luna's UST has surpassed makerDAO's DAI as the largest (by marketcap) algorithmic stablecoin, despite the fact that DAI has been around for much longer. > > Do Kwon, Terra's founder has recently announced that Terra plans to buy [11 billion dollars worth of bitcoin](https://cryptosnewss.com/terra-ust-buys-125-million-worth-of-btc-out-of-11-2-billion-planned-to-acquire-in-three-month-period/) in the next 3 months, to further diversify the backing of UST to make sure that UST can continue to maintain it's peg to the USD. > > The Anchor protocol, which is an essential part of the Terra ecosystem, offers an unprecedented 19.5-20.5% APR on UST. It has run smoothly for over a year without any problems, unlike many other stablecoins promising high returns but ended up rugpulling. > > [According to Electric Capital](https://youtu.be/_ZKsunlK7sA?t=4628), from December 2020 to December 2021, Terra is no.1 in the fastest growing ecosystems, in terms of growth of full time developers, at 313%. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mwy/top_10_terra_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive##wiki_terra.28luna.29) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Mentions:#DAI

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xpwwdf/daily_general_discussion_september_28_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xpwwdf/daily_general_discussion_september_28_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Terra Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by idevcg which won 3rd place in the Terra Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > Terra Luna's UST has surpassed makerDAO's DAI as the largest (by marketcap) algorithmic stablecoin, despite the fact that DAI has been around for much longer. > > Do Kwon, Terra's founder has recently announced that Terra plans to buy [11 billion dollars worth of bitcoin](https://cryptosnewss.com/terra-ust-buys-125-million-worth-of-btc-out-of-11-2-billion-planned-to-acquire-in-three-month-period/) in the next 3 months, to further diversify the backing of UST to make sure that UST can continue to maintain it's peg to the USD. > > The Anchor protocol, which is an essential part of the Terra ecosystem, offers an unprecedented 19.5-20.5% APR on UST. It has run smoothly for over a year without any problems, unlike many other stablecoins promising high returns but ended up rugpulling. > > [According to Electric Capital](https://youtu.be/_ZKsunlK7sA?t=4628), from December 2020 to December 2021, Terra is no.1 in the fastest growing ecosystems, in terms of growth of full time developers, at 313%. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mwy/top_10_terra_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive##wiki_terra.28luna.29) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Mentions:#DAI

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Terra Pro-Arguments Below is an argument written by idevcg which won 3rd place in the Terra Pro-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > Terra Luna's UST has surpassed makerDAO's DAI as the largest (by marketcap) algorithmic stablecoin, despite the fact that DAI has been around for much longer. > > Do Kwon, Terra's founder has recently announced that Terra plans to buy [11 billion dollars worth of bitcoin](https://cryptosnewss.com/terra-ust-buys-125-million-worth-of-btc-out-of-11-2-billion-planned-to-acquire-in-three-month-period/) in the next 3 months, to further diversify the backing of UST to make sure that UST can continue to maintain it's peg to the USD. > > The Anchor protocol, which is an essential part of the Terra ecosystem, offers an unprecedented 19.5-20.5% APR on UST. It has run smoothly for over a year without any problems, unlike many other stablecoins promising high returns but ended up rugpulling. > > [According to Electric Capital](https://youtu.be/_ZKsunlK7sA?t=4628), from December 2020 to December 2021, Terra is no.1 in the fastest growing ecosystems, in terms of growth of full time developers, at 313%. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2mwy/top_10_terra_proarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive##wiki_terra.28luna.29) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds.

Mentions:#DAI

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

Is DAI really at risk?

Mentions:#DAI

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xp0c4c/daily_general_discussion_september_27_2022_gmt0/).

That’s the good part. Each token is responsible for their own judge. If I create a reversible token following this standard, then I choose who’s the judge. For example, let’s say that MakerDAO adopts the ERC20-R for DAI. Then, the own DAO can be the judge. That been said, reversible ETH is out the table, we’re talking about smart contracts and tokens… this is nothing new

Mentions:#DAI#DAO#ETH

I use LTC for most of my exchange trasnfer. If the market is too volatile then I use DAI, but Litecoin is my most used crypto for actual transactions. LTC is the crypto I have the most affection for.

Mentions:#LTC#DAI

#USDC Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by ExchangeEnough7821 which won 2nd place in the USDC Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > **What is USD coin (USDC)?** > USD coin is a stablecoin, first announced in May 2018. It is developed by the Circle Consortium - a partnership between the company Circle and the exchange Coinbase. Circle and Coinbase are responsible for issuing the USD coin, and Centre develops the technology behind and the framework of it. Circle is a company founded in 2013 by Jeremy Allaire and Sean Neville, and is an official Money Transmitter – it must comply with federal law and regulations. Now, it has over 60 partners and is continuing to expand. > Uses of USD coin: > • Avoid inflation in countries with weak economies > • Send money around the world without large fees, securely and instantly > • Short other coins without having to convert to fiat > • Buys things in crypto based apps and websites > > > **Cons of USD coin** : > • Although the cost of transferring USD coin may be less than if it were fiat, when the Ethereum network is congested it can get very expensive to transfer even a small amount > > • Although USD coin can be use in some DeFi apps and games, there are very few day-to-day uses for USDC – there is almost no shops, restaurants or companies that will accept it in everyday circumstances, reducing its usability > > • Staking USDC can be risky compared to holding fiat in a bank – banks have FDIC insurance and your money is almost guaranteed to be safe, albeit with a lower interest rate, but there are many examples of DeFi apps that have been hacked with funds drained so your money is in more danger > > • Another issue that may put people off from USD coin is that it is centralised – it is governed by Circle, so it the reserves cannot be verified, unlike decentralised options like DAI and SameUSD > > • Although transferrin USD coin is very fast, certain fiat services -most notably PayPal – have even shorter transfer times, sometimes 1 second or less > > • Even though crypto is getting more mainstream with simpler apps, it can be difficult for many to understand how to use and stake this coin to achieve its full potential, and if it is held in private wallets and the seed key is forgotten there is nothing anyone can do to retrieve the funds, unlike apps like PayPal > > \*”What is USD coin” and “Uses of USD coin” is copied between both of my USD pros, and USD cons, but I wrote it myself\* ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2moj/top_10_usd_coin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_USD_Coin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xo380x/daily_general_discussion_september_26_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#USDC#DAI

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/xo380x/daily_general_discussion_september_26_2022_gmt0/).

#Bitcoin Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by bkcrypt0 which won 1st place in the Bitcoin Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > # Bitcoin is failing its original mission, and institutional interest is going to make things worse. > > **Background** > > Satoshi Nakamoto was a financial revolutionary out to counter the fiat money presses that destroy a currency's value with inflation (looking at you Turkey and the U.S.) The method—create a currency with a fixed supply, mined liked gold to make it scarce, and digitally transferable anywhere in the world between any parties. > > **Lack of Stability** > > Bitcoin can't be used as a global currency to replace fiat and eliminate politicized money printing because it has to hold its value steady over time. > > Why? > > People work for dollars, euros, yen, or yuan because there is relative stability in their paychecks from week to week. Their food, rent/mortgage, clothing, energy costs are also relatively stable (inflation is the cost for using that particular currency, but it beats a 50% drop in value over the course of a few months, and most inflation around the world isn't as bad as Turkey or Venezuela.) > > Imagine being paid a flat 1BTC / year for a particular job. But you live in the U.S. and the value of that BTC just dropped over the course of the year by 50%. Your lease is fixed over 12 months. Your food costs are the same or maybe even higher. Not only do you still get hit with local inflation, your buying power just dropped by half. > > This is why over $155B\* have flowed into stable coins like USDT, USDC, BUSD, UST, and DAI) > > **Lack of Accountability** > > The relatively anonymous transfer of value between parties was supposed to be a positive aspect of bitcoin. Your money, so do what you want with it. The problem is, there are a lot of other people that also want anonymity — human traffickers, dangerous drug smugglers, crime syndicates, tax evaders. Sure they can also use USD (and most of them do), but they are also traceable if they enter the global financial system. > > Making it easier for criminals to evade authorities makes everyone less safe. And sure, no one likes to pay taxes, but consider the alternative. Roads, schools, social services, some hospitals, police and fire departments, they all rely on taxes. > > **Lack of security** > > Unlike gold, which is pretty much indestructible, Bitcoin holdings depend on keeping seed phrases secure. If there were a house fire a gold bar might melt, but it can be reformed. A hardware wallet will be destroyed and any seed phrases stored on paper will be gone. That's part of gold's appeal as a store of value. > > Also, were there to be an internet outage in any widespread way, Bitcoin is useless as a transaction currency (part of the appeal of physical paper money and metal coins.) While unlikely, this scenario speaks to the lack of overall security in Bitcoin as a means of exchange (it has other benefits like cryptographic security, but its lack of physicality poses problems with public perception, and practical uses.) > > **Acts like fiat, moves like fiat . . .** > > Bitcoin remains highly correlated to traditional finance markets (two recent readings were the highest they've been -- see link below) and doesn't exactly act as a hedge against inflation when it plummets in the face of, well, high inflation. > > What this shows is that big money is controlling Bitcoin (and by association the rest of crypto) by reacting in the same risk-off reaction when inflation flares up. > > It goes something like this: > > * When inflation rises, the Fed tightens money supply to slow things down. > * Big money flees from riskier assets like company stock (they likely won't be as profitable in a high inflation world) > * Stock prices drop \[and here's the problem\] > * Money does not flow INTO crypto as a hedge against this risk, it also flees. > > **Conclusion** > > Fighting fiat money printing excesses was never going to be easy, but as with most revolutions, unintended consequences often derail the original vision. > > For one, government policies can avert the worst of political impulses. That doesn't require a wholesale financial market revolution. > > U.S. inflation has also been remarkably low for well over two decades. It was a once in a century global pandemic that forced a massive print run of dollars. > > Bitcoin has also become just another a plaything for the rich, a commodity to be bought and sold for profit rather than the antidote to centralized money creation. And because even larger stacks of fiat are on the sidelines waiting to jump in, volatility is going to get even worse with big swings as fund managers chase and take profits. > > None of this means Bitcoin has no value in global finance. It just means it isn't going to serve the purpose as originally intended. > > \------------------ > > * For Bitcoin correlation to stocks see: [https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes](https://seekingalpha.com/news/3784018-how-does-bitcoin-correlate-with-us-dollar-stocks-other-asset-classes) > * Stablecoin totals for the five mentioned above were calculated on 1/11/21 from CoinMarketCap - [https://coinmarketcap.com/](https://coinmarketcap.com/) ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/ru2lpo/top_10_bitcoin_conarguments_january_2022/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Bitcoin) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argum