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r/BitcoinSee Post

Will it be possible to access the internet when you refuse to use CBDC's?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Still trying to get my Monero cpu mining rig going, any thoughts?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Bitcoin vs porn: an energy comparison

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Report on whether blockchains are really decentralized

r/BitcoinSee Post

Bitcoin is decentralized, but is the internet?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What it really means when we have the ability to take the IRS to court when they get info about our crypto use

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Tornado Cash and WHY privacy chains are important!?!

r/BitcoinSee Post

Canada's banking system and electronic fiat payment system (Interac) has been cripple today by one major ISP (Internet service provider) outage. Meanwhile, the Bitcoin and lightning network is still rocking for everyone else using a different ISP.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

anybody read the trail of bit report commissioned by DARPA? Long story short, it doesn't matter how decentralized we get because...

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Utility to market cap ratio is not governed by utility value.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Is the MXC token a possible scam?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Industrial Money

r/BitcoinSee Post

DARPA Report

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

1Inch cooperates Russian special services?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

A Beginner’s Guide to Crypto

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The utility of non-fungible blockchain IDs.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Does the KYC requirements from centralized exchanges bother you?.

r/CryptoMoonShotsSee Post

$PKT Cash — decentralized layer-1 blockchain project with real utility aspects based on PacketCrypt proof of work — listed on BitMart and Bittrex

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Crypto crackdown on Argentina!

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Small Cap Kucoin Gems to plant a seed in

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Small Cap Kucoin Gems to plant a seed in

r/BitcoinSee Post

orders delay !!!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

orders delay help !!!

r/BitcoinSee Post

orders delay help !!!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

I just don't see how the web 3.0 concept will work.

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

We've been wasting bandwidth, but decentralised bandwidth offers a solution that I believe everyone should try!!

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

We've been wasting bandwidth, but decentralised bandwidth offers a solution that I believe everyone should try!!

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Crypto is passive. Yes I know you knew that before but it’s the other way now,You just use your daily things and still earn a certain amount

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Is there a way to make money with crypto that isn't just trading?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Where I see the next big change in Web 3

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Crypto is passive. Yes I know you knew that before but it’s the other way now,You just use your daily things and still earn a certain amount

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

There are projects revolutionizing the way we surf and the way we use internet.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Is there a way to make money with crypto that isn't just trading? [CAREFULLY DO SPACING]

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How the web 3 may change the medium of consumer participation in the future with the rate of adoption rises. In addition to trading, new cryptocurrency projects have emerged in which users can earn money.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Is there a way to make money with crypto that isn't just trading? [CAREFULLY DO SPACING]

r/BitcoinSee Post

Thinking of Playing Around With Running a Bitcoin Node. Any Veterans Here With Tips?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Ways to Hide Your Crypto Investments & Transactions

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Here is how Ethereum COULD scale without increasing centralisation and without depending on layer two's.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Here is how Bitcoin COULD scale to have 1 Gigabyte big blocks without increasing centralisation and without having to depend on custodial Lightning wallets.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What's your experience of SpaceChain?

r/BitcoinSee Post

Full Node Newbie: Security Question

r/BitcoinSee Post

Question: Bitcoin Ban

Mentions

"Them" - your ISP, or whom are you referring to? I never heard of someone actually wanting to be spied on but if so, yes, just run on clearnet (the default).

Mentions:#ISP

ISP knows your using VPN. But I know nothing on how much information is blocked using vpn

Mentions:#ISP

Not sure what you're getting at? What does using a VPN to encrypt data have to do with my ISP?

Mentions:#ISP

No. You can mask it from a third party by using a VPN, but you cannot truly hide it since the internet is built based on the idea that everybody has a public IP address that others can talk to them with. Any time you connect to a website, that website *instantly* knows the IP address you're connecting from, and from it can get basic information such as your ISP, region, etc.

Mentions:#ISP

it's good to make people aware but the impact is really overrated So they are capturing your IP address. It CAN be used to identify you, if the authorities are tracking you for a specific reason, however they will need to go to the ISP with a warrant and court order to get that information. They are very likely tracking you in this case from many other sources But you may also be using a friend's wifi, a public wifi, shared hotspot not in your name, work wifi, a VPN or any number of things which means the IP collected is not related to you . The IP address would be a small part of an overall data set that would need to be collected to personally identify you The only thing public about your IP address that people can get is a general fairly broad geographical location Also worth mentioning that people who are outraged about this have been posting on Twitter, which guess what, also collects your IP address and much more Many people don't give a second thought about using social media, google assistant, alexa etc which captures far more information but this is the line in the sand for them? A Web service logging your public IP address? I can understand people wanting their privacy but the impact of someone storing your IP address is way overblown

Mentions:#ISP

If you can get into your router settings you can change how frequently your IP changes. Most ISP set the router default to 90-150 days. The only reason I can think why is a new IP can disconnect some older devices, causing a poor user experience and more Karen call volume to the ISP. You can set it to change daily if you want, or more frequently if you have a decent router. Your localhost address and user/pass to access all the settings are on the back, it looks something like http://127.0.0.1/ If your IP still doesn't want to change, type "ipconfig /release" then "ipconfig /renew" in a command prompt. This orders your DHCP client to renegotiate an IP address lease with the DHCP server on your router. Essentially, a new IP. Static IPs are a security risk.

Mentions:#ISP

For my local in the US it depends on the provider. I had one I could get a new IP simply by restarting the ISP modem; my current provider I'll have the same IP for months and months. They will update it, but I have no control over it vs the other provider. I feel this is a company policy and has nothing to do with location.

Mentions:#ISP

It's still a dynamic IP but the ISP doesn't change it that often

Mentions:#ISP

I'm a network engineer for a large ISP. Yes, almost all residential IPs in the industry are dynamic, but everyone still keeps track of who has what IP and when. On the rare occasion that we get a subpoena saying "We were able to get the IP address that X criminal (kidnapper, human trafficker, etc), had last week, and we need to know who had this IP at that time" we need to be able to give accurate info. Or more commonly, we need to know who we need to send a "stop torrenting, dammit" letter to when we get a copyright claim.

Mentions:#ISP

I can only speak about my ISP but the IP assigned to me doesn't change for weeks. It's not that dynamic, maybe if a client reboots their router constantly the IP changes more often

Mentions:#ISP

it's good to make people aware but the impact is really overrated So they are capturing your IP address. It CAN be used to identify you, if the authorities are tracking you for a specific reason. They will need to go to the ISP with a warrant and court order to get that information But you may also be using a friend's wifi, a public wifi, shared hotspot not in your name, a VPN or any number of things. The IP address would be a small part of an overall data set that would need to be collected to personally identify you The only thing public about your IP address that people can get is a general fairly broad geographical location Also worth mentioning that people who are outraged about this have been posting on Twitter, which guess what, also collects your IP address and much more Many people don't give a second thought about using social media, google assistant, alexa etc which captures far more information but this is the line in the sand for them? I can understand people wanting their privacy but this is way overblown

Mentions:#ISP

Thing is, most ISP will dynamically assign your IP address and actually charge you extra for a static. So the real answer might be as simple as switching off your router for 1 minute each day.

Mentions:#ISP

If they tie accounts to an IP, if you check the same accounts with a different IP they can assume it's still you... just with a different IP. But at least it isn't a straight line to your ISP/location. Still not ideal... best to use a different wallet that commits to not track you.

Mentions:#ISP

Is this a slip up or do they just not care. ​ Like keep in mind we live in a 2 tier system. 1. If you kidnap someone, hold someone hostage until ransom is paid, etc. Then a world of hurt is coming your way. But if a cop illegally arrest you (kidnaps you), puts you in jail until you pay (hold you hostage until you pay your ransom), and so on. The worse they get is a slap on the wrist due to qualified immunity. 2. If someone beats you in the head and there is evidence. You can go into a station and cops normally will arrest the person. If you show evidence of a cop doing the same to you, then they MIGHT take a complaint and they MIGHT investigate themselves to find no wrong doing. 3. If a law maker or judge does insider trading then pretty much nothing happens. But if you do it, then jail time. 4. Companies regularly lobby and get policy pushed through to make it impossible for new competing companies from coming up. In my state NC there was a city tired of the ISP dicking around and not giving them proper internet. So they looked into it and found out it was cheaper to just make their own internet company for the areas. AND IT WORKED. Then ISP lobbied and pushed through policy so no other city, county, etc can make their own ISP and they made it near impossible for someone to start their own. 5. We all know about the stories of drug deals for rich and famous people. To the point drugs are supplied. But your average joe goes to jail. ​ I can go on. But one thing I noticed is unlike when I was a kid, a lot of these things would've been mostly hidden. But I noticed over the past 10 years places just don't care anymore about hiding it. Like they all know YOU can't do anything about it. They have the bigger gun, they can manipulate the system in any way they want, and they can make your life a living hell until you off yourself. So they basically have you over the barrel. So this could easily be him testing how little effort he really needs to put into this before something happens.

Mentions:#ISP

*wants privacy in crypto* *uses a surveillance coin* You should be using Tor or at least a very trustworthy VPN if concerned about IP leaks while using crypto. If surveillance of that kind is a concern, you’re already open to getting dinged by so many other avenues. Monitoring the traffic leaving your device or home via ISP or any website you visit can time correlate your crypto activity, given a determined attacker. So protect your IP address. The real irony is using something so traceable as ETH and expecting some degree of privacy? Very confusing.

Mentions:#ISP#ETH

Oh that's interesting, I hadn't thought of that. I've been wanting to run my own node just to contribute to the network but my PC isn't great and I'm not connected 24/7, maybe next year I'll get a dedicated laptop or something, need to make sure my ISP won't have a problem with the data, too.

Mentions:#ISP

ISP's in some countries have to track every address they give out, so it could be a way to KYC a wallet in the future.

Mentions:#ISP

In what way? It certainly stops me from getting letters from my ISP about torrents.

Mentions:#ISP

tried with different browser? Also if using vpn try changing the location or disable it. Could be your ISP as well

Mentions:#ISP

Here's the question - how bad does someone want to find you? In general, anyone with an IP address is traceable to a real person. For normal people they purchase Internet services from a local ISP, are allotted an IP address and go about their business on the Internet. Anyone can see their IP address, look up what ISP owns it at [www.arin.net](https://www.arin.net) and law enforcement can contact them and ask for the name and other identifying details of the person who was on that IP address at the time. Easy peasy. For more clever people they could run through a VPN company that keeps no customer logs. It becomes a lot harder then but not impossible. Consider the dude that ran the website Silk Road. You can look him up on Wikipedia here - he was fairly careful, ran his website on the Tor network, encrypted everything, used a VPN, etc. He's also serving a life sentence right now: [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross\_Ulbricht](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross_Ulbricht) Here's why... if you're going to do something in secret from the government on the Internet, you take probably 500 actions on the Internet every day. You must make sure that 100% of them are done in a way that does not trace back to the real you. 500 actions, 365 days per year. You have to be 100% perfect. Or they will get you. Re-use a name on multiple sites? That's a link. Talk about yourself too much? That's a link. If they want you bad enough, they'll take the time to put those pieces together. They'll contact you with offers to do business together. They'll send you money to entice you into meeting them somewhere. If the government wants to shut down BTC, they'll simply shut down BTC. If you think that's not the case, you're deluding yourself. That's why it's so silly that everyone thinks that BTC is the answer to hyperinflation. You have no idea how strong the government is and how willing they are to use that strength - here's a history lesson: [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold\_Reserve\_Act#:\~:text=The%20passage%20of%20the%20Gold,restricted%20gold%20ownership%20and%20trade](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_Reserve_Act#:~:text=The%20passage%20of%20the%20Gold,restricted%20gold%20ownership%20and%20trade). ​ >Immediately following passage of the Act, the President, Franklin D. Roosevelt, changed the statutory price of gold from $20.67 per troy ounce to $35 > >\[...\] > >A year earlier, in 1933, Executive Order 6102 had made it a criminal offense for U.S. citizens to own or trade gold anywhere in the world, with exceptions for some jewelry and collector's coins. These prohibitions were relaxed starting in 1964 Over three decades where it was illegal to own gold in the United States but you think your Internet connected miners are somehow safe.

Mentions:#ISP#BTC

>So youve revealed that youre not familiar with encrypted torrenting. Theres many invite only encrypted torrenting websites that make it so your internet service provider (ISP) cannot see that youre torrenting. The average Joe would never use such thing, just like they do not use Bitcoin because it is not easy to use for them. Just because there is a way for something illegal to be do so, most of the people won't do it, only the ones who are wiling to risk the penalty for it. Bitcoin won't be able to become a store of value or currency if people are afraid to use it. >I think you have a sort of fantastical fatalistic view, which makes it so no matter what is said here, you will always say "oh but what if they figure out a way?" There was no civil movement in the history which made any impact on the ruling caste. People can come and go but the system is still. The top 1% can always tell how we can and cannot do anything. You can be a criminal, that is your choice, but the average 99% people won't risk to go to jail for having Bitcoin. >My advice to you is to stop talking to me You are asking questions and I'm answering. So feel free to stop talking to me. >and trying to take my word for it, and instead see for yourself. I only talk about what I see, I experienced everything I told you. >Download bisq and give it a try, its honestly a remarkably simple process. Once you try it, youll begin to see what im saying in regards to the idea that you cannot ban it. You still think this whole crypto thing is a single service, namely bisq. This scene has infinite attack sides by the top 1%, bisq won't be able to evenhandedly hold Bitcoin for good. For the millionth time: \- They can make a felony to send any crypto transaction \- They can put 50% tax to holding crypto \- They can put 50% tax on earning fiat with crypto \- They can make all the crypto exchanges illegal \- They can ban you from ever paying for crypto with CBDC \- The can also buy the whole reserve of Bitcoin and send it to a "lost" wallet. 1-2 Trillion USD is nothing to the money printing monetary system. Maybe they already doing this through institutions. Only with these few regulations, which they could make from endless regulations, Bitcoin will be easily disabled.

Mentions:#ISP

So youve revealed that youre not familiar with encrypted torrenting. Theres many invite only encrypted torrenting websites that make it so your internet service provider (ISP) cannot see that youre torrenting. In the USA torrenting is illegal too, and if you dont use encrypted torrents youll get a letter from your ISP. Germany isnt unique in that regard. ​ I think you have a sort of fantastical fatalistic view, which makes it so no matter what is said here, you will always say "oh but what if they figure out a way?" My advice to you is to stop talking to me and trying to take *my* word for it, and instead see for yourself. Download bisq and give it a try, its honestly a super easy process.

Mentions:#ISP

Hmm, though this seems like a kindness brag - there are alot of issues with this post and I'll (briefly) explain why, as others have too. 2FA can be exploited, mobile phones except the most elite phones are all exploitable. Be wary of using mobile for Anything. Personally, if you have to use mobile - have a unique wallet JUST for that phone or tablet, and only have a few bucks on it for interactions. Make it a habit to send out anything over X amount on that phone daily/weekly - and if you buy NFTs use it as an intermediary to you main account(s) where you hodl your stuff (preferably in cold storage). As far as bad actors and malicious code - there seems to be an uptick. Several of my crypto collegaues these past few weeks got hit with bad downloads - and nothing obvious like torrented content. They got hit by fake devs spreading fake POCs that downloaded malicious code and hijacked their shit. If you're going to go in deep on crypto - phones and tablest are securable enough unless you really know your backend stuff, which is likely not very many. Same with PCs and Routers and etc. Dont just get your device (laptop ex) and turn it on, and connect to the net with your "condom" of security orotocols in place. Don't just unbox your router, connect the internet to your ISP and expect your router to be impregnable etc. Esp if you use windows - just stop and spend a day-a week and learn about all the settings, ways you can be attacked (attack vectors) and tweak your settings and get the right programs. Once u get your right programs - dont just use them out of the box - tweak their settings to match your settings etc. One very good protective program is malwarebytes (pro worth it) and make sure you turn on all the features. Out of the box, it doesnt work as good as a fully activated MB. ​ Same thing with routers. We are just now getting WPA3 security, so your old routers need new firmware or just get new mesh systems, and make sure to tweak them! Like im not kidding, the most vulnerable point is where you connect to the isp for the internet. Routers are essentially mini computers now, and need to be secured. You need to get into your admin panel (and make sure to change your admin and password) put all the guards up and protect your shit from the outside world. This also goes to port protection and firewalls. Dont just connect devices blindly without knowing what you are doing and expect your stuff to be safe. ​ Crypto is a self-custodian existence. Meaning you ARE your own bank. This is why FTX shit happens, the general populace cant be their own bank, and are not willing to take a week to secure all their devices, its like your house, what happens if u leave your door open? U gonna get broken into, same with your "internet door" close it, lock it and grab a shotgun.

Mentions:#ISP#MB#FTX

[https://mynodebtc.com/](https://mynodebtc.com/) can be run in a VM. i've run it in vmware workstation if i remember correctly it takes about 600GB data transfer to sync initially so might go over your ISP bandwidth limit for first month

Mentions:#ISP

It uses the EUTXO model which is like BTC's protocol but with smart contracts on top of it. This makes it a little more difficult to work with but provides engineering benefits such as scaling with out the need to shard (global state). Global state is a big no no in software development. Because of this model it can tell you whether a transaction would fial or pass before attempting it, so you don't lose your gas fee because you didn't have to attempt the request. ​ It's a PoS system with no lockup on your stake, rewards are automatically put back into staking. I think Eth POS borrowed a lot from Cardano, but I could be wrong there. Cardano has it's own VC fund. Their is an app called catalyst that has funding rounds where devs can make a proposals and ADA holders vote on which ones to fund. ​ Then there is Hydra and Mithril protocols that will be ready soon but i don't remember enough about them to elaborate here. ​ I'm sure there is much more that I missed. ​ I also really like that they want to rebuild the world's systems with Cardano. Because of this they are targeting a lot of developing nations to build with it. They have field offices in many of these countries and their are a few projects that are promising. Atala Prism for Identity management, which Ethiopia has bought and plans to implement. Another cool project is World Mobile Token, this will be an ISP built on Cardano that gives users control of their data. They can chose to sell it to advertisers or not to. The WMT token will be used to pay for your internet service. This is targeted for release in Zanzibar first (they are building it in Zanzibar) and can be expanded to other nations in Africa and around the world. Cardana is very unique i would recommend doing your own research, but because of it's shaky start social media users has a lot of negativity towards it. At 1 point they had to recode the entire project because their independent security audit found some major issues.

Crypto isn't too blame. Users with no knowledge of crypto are. There's no need for an exchange, people use it because they are either lazy or uniformed. Those are the same chads that got into crypto to make money (vs understanding and believing in the technology). There is no technology in a centralized exchange.... This is like blaming they internet when your ISP (Comcast / ATT) increases your prices or shuts down your service.....

Mentions:#ISP#ATT

I built a server back in the day, I hosted a website, it got hacked so I bought a firewall, I had to get a SSL cert so data going over the internet isn’t in plain text, I had to back it up and monitor it, there was too much demand and the website was too slow to use so I built a web farm, I then had to improve the bandwidth to the server from the internet for the same reason, I then had to provide multiple ISP’s to my server because of outages, then I had to virtualise it, there was too much risk with it in a server room so I moved it all to a data center, there was risk of the data center going down so I had to get another data center and mirror it there, it was getting expensive and I had global demand so I moved it to the cloud and geo-located it, I had a log in area, users were getting phished so I had to set up MFA. None of this is cheap, but these are mostly historical problems and solutions. What a shame there was no Fleek back then (/S), I’d have had no job! Forget using crypto as a currency for a second. Web3 is simply a redesign and improvement to the client/server model we currently run. ICP is at the forefront in the hosting of the dapps that are being created. Web3 for me is about cost and security, I can host a website which is replicated, better for the environment, more secure by design, faster (latency) and cheaper than I can host it on AWS. In the corporate world, it’s the future IT architects who will transition to Web3, not the end users. Crypto without utility is a greater fool game. The work some projects are putting in to build a better safer internet is unreal, yet people decide to buy a coin because it has a picture of a cute dog on it, and everyone else has and they’re in profit, that’s the shit bit of crypto and I can’t wait for it to fuck off and I hope more go under.

Mentions:#ISP#ICP#AWS

Ok, but if you stop paying your ISP the police is gonna knock on or door because you didn't pay? And ok, makes sense, for some reason there weren't enough people interested in building that place, it failed, I'm ok with that as long as no one was forced to do something against their will.

Mentions:#ISP

Yea this is where it first went wrong. CBs bad cs just made it way worse but if the ISP had been professional, nothing would have been able to happen afaik. Best of luck to you OP.

Mentions:#ISP#OP

Hard disagree. Any proof? I can point to multinational coalitions like WTO, NATO, Belt and Road, the fucking UN. Down vote all you want. I'm right you are just wishing. You grow your own food, have your own power grid and run your own ISP? If not, I'd think about how "irrelevant" government really is to you and everyone else in general. Systems of rules with groups of people aren't going anywhere anytime soon. The fact you used a caveman example shows me you really don't have a firm grasp of the real impact of government on your world.

Mentions:#ISP

You were definitely arguing the right topic, just with some faulty points 🙂 There will still be ways around it for sure (as there always is with technology). I’m not familiar enough with networking technology to tell you definitely that there’s another way around ISP traffic, but I’m almost sure there has to be some way you can encrypt the traffic from your end, it may just be quite complex for the average person. VPNs might come with this kind of integration in the future if possible (or maybe some already do)

Mentions:#ISP

That's actually a good point. And so obvious lol. Yes, you're right. Access of a single individual can be restricted for non-payment, but don't know if it can be restricted for wanting to pay but not with CBDC's. I guess it boils down to future regulation. But you have a good and obvious point. I guess what I was trying to emphasise is that there are options and you can take precautions early if you're fortunate enough to live in a "favorable" regime. And now I'm interested to know how you can avoid that data being past to ISP. Is there a solution to that?

Mentions:#ISP

Yet to hear of a network provider restricting access? What about when somebody doesn’t pay their bill, people get shut off all the time so it’s definitely possible. Also, VPNs hide nothing from an ISP, the data still goes out from your network, to the VPN network, and then to the client.

Mentions:#ISP

Yea, ISP will be no problem. But you're only allowed to purchase items from authorized sale domains, registered with Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). So if you want to buy that chef's knife, you have to go through an authorized website (like Amazon) which will only accept your CBDC, and only sells from the 2026 KYC supplier laws. So there's traceability from the manufacturer to the seller to you. This is how the new crime algorithms trawl for cases. The computer designates the account as suspicious (they use the term "aberrant") and all economic activity is frozen until the signatures are provided along with their permissions.

Mentions:#ISP

Starlink is a solid ISP, and I doubt that Elon would let the bankers get away with that crap.

Mentions:#ISP

Even Bitcoin, you're at the whimp of your ISP. Without access to the internet and a way to validate your BTC, you just own a fancy thumb drive.

Mentions:#ISP#BTC

> Let's not think about the internet as being 'centralised' since anyone can start an ISP and provide services to customers. I can agree to that. Centralization is a spectrum really. But when you've used the internet in Russia or China like I have for the past few years, you really start looking differently at it. > [...] but there's only a few leading miners because Proof of Work forces a power-law distribution. So they can be censored or forced not to serve certain addresses and TX. They could indeed be censored, however, only one miner needs to include your transaction. Doesn't need to be a big one. The interesting part to me though is, as more big miners get censored, the more attractive it becomes to for small miners to start mining. > People seem to be saying that a node makes a TX, and then its relayed, and then eventually it gets into a block even if the big miners won't process it. I'm not sure that's always going to be true, but I fail to see how the mesh network helps. Strictly speaking, those people are wrong, since no miner can be forced to accept your transaction. It's a completely voluntary system, the sender isn't obligated to attach any miner fees, and the miners aren't obligated to accept your transaction. The network being a mesh network has no bearing at all on these dynamics. > You could bounce a forbidden TX around the node network forever, but if a miner won't accept it, it's invisible. That is why the recipient of coins should always wait for 1 confirmation, and preferably more.

Mentions:#ISP

OK... I *need* to understand this more, because I don't understand it fully and I also doubt the integrity of the arguments. From what I've understood, de-centralisation has little to do with the horizontal distribution of the blockchain amongst many participants and more to do with competition between the miners. Let's not think about the internet as being 'centralised' since anyone can start an ISP and provide services to customers. I'm not denying that there are gatekeepers and that the majority of IPv4 nodes are controlled by Amazon AWS, Google and Facebook etc. BUT, it's still decentralised and still, I believe, a mesh network. That makes 'the internet' resilient to censorship in the sense that you can always 'find a route' but ISPs are relatively easy to censor because they're nearly always companies which can be shut down if they host illegal content (for example). So I get that you'd want a mesh network to relay TXs on Bitcoin so that no one could stop the signals. That much makes sense, but there's only a few leading miners because Proof of Work forces a power-law distribution. So they can be censored or forced not to serve certain addresses and TX. People seem to be saying that a node makes a TX, and then its relayed, and then eventually it gets into a block even if the big miners won't process it. I'm not sure that's always going to be true, but I fail to see how the mesh network helps. You could bounce a forbidden TX around the node network forever, but if a miner won't accept it, it's invisible.

Mentions:#ISP#AWS

No. The bitcoin network is not mesh network on the *network layer*, it is a mesh network at the *application layer*. All packets still go over the Internet, which is still quite centralized through ISP's. They don't have to though, if you wanted to you can transmit TX data using ham radios, satellite, pigeons or smoke signals. As long as it somehow reaches the network, it's fine. For example, you could be a peer node to me, and even though we don't have direct data connections, at the application level we're still peers.

Mentions:#ISP

Do you actually understand basic ISP infrastructure requirements? Or even the basic principles of how the internet works? I know the answer is no, but figured I would ask anyway. I think you’re in for a rude awakening.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I want to set up a node but my ISP won’t allow it (it’s provided through work so I’ve no way around it) ☹️

Mentions:#ISP

i thought i was the only one lagging. My ISP sucks

Mentions:#ISP

If he wants to go full Karen he should sue his ISP as well for allowing this to happen on their bandwidth

Mentions:#ISP

My internet is fucked my country ISP keeps screwing things, sorry about that.

Mentions:#ISP

Nodes are placing user's legal responsibility on the node operator, who think are covered, but are not. As a node operator , you are basically an ISP as far as laws are concerned, in the US and in Europe. If you dont fulfill your legal obligations as an ISP, then you dont qualify as an ISP and thus are not protected by an ISP status, making you at best an accomplice in whatever is done with the node. Pretty sure that wont go very well after some node operators get jail time after a node user deals massive damage to a company or country.

Mentions:#ISP

I trust my ISP much more than Id trust a VPN provider.

Mentions:#ISP

If you connect to a site like Coinbase without any encryption or any secured connection, then your ISP will know you are interacting with that site. But they'll only have the data carried between you and the site, not between the site and your wallet, much less the blockchain. Coinbase uses a secured connection, so the data isn't open, and only end to end, and the ISP can't see any info about any wallet address or site content. So the ISP only knows the website you go to. Additionally, if you use a good VPN, the entire connection is encrypted end to end, and your ISP can't see what you're doing.

Mentions:#ISP

If you use an API wallet like MetaMask, yes. API calls go to endpoints revealing use of a crypto wallet. You could use a VPN, but then you are just swapping an ISP for a VPN provider. If you use a blockchain that exposes fullnode wallets for ordinary users, then it becomes less clear. An ISP could do some traffic sniffing to see you are running a fullnode, but they would have difficulty understanding much more. If you connect that fullnode via Tor, then all they can see is a Tor connection.

Mentions:#API#ISP

The ISP doesn't see your data because all websites are using secured connections (HTTPS). But they know which links / websites you're browsing to (with ISP I mean your internet provider, not Google). Since Metamask is a Browser extension, your Browser might receive data from it, if you use Chrome, this would mean Google *might* obtain this data. If you want to be more anonymous, you should use Linux (Ubuntu is nice) for crypto stuff. It's much more secure, too! >if this is mega dumb, just tell me and I'll delete the post lol Definitely not dumb, I don't think more than 10% of people in this sub can answer your question.

Mentions:#ISP

Any mechanism that shares revenue in this fashion encourages free-riding on the nodes that run the services which collect fees for the network. It's a bit like every ISP in a community collecting the same amount in revenue no matter how many customers they serve. For optimal security at lowest cost-per-byte, you need to do what Saito does -- make income is proportional to the work a node does collecting money and sharing it with others in the network. This also eliminates the costless majoritarian attacks, etc. Once the economics are sorted you can look into things like extending UTXO, etc.

Mentions:#ISP

Look folks, I'm a pretty smart guy, but this is where I gotta give up. The bitcoin ecosphere is evolving and changing so fast I can't keep up any more. I was there during the great segwit wars, and learned about merkle trees, and saw the lightening network grow up. So I've been pretty savvy, all things considered. But now I just can't keep up with the news and the innovations. Things are moving at a faster and faster pace! I remember sitting in a movie theatre as a kid, watching previews before the main show. After some clip, at the bottom of the screen there was a web address. WWW.WHATEVER.COM. I laughed and told my buddy, "Who the fuck wants to use their phone line, to log into their ISP, to go to a website, to watch a clip and read about a movie? Stupid shit man." IMDB is globally ranked #60 on websites used today. In August they have almost a billion visitors. 71% of those were using cell phones. Back when I saw that webpage advertisement, we were still using pagers. I gotta say, I'm hodling on for dear life here but the tech is beyond me at this point and where it goes I can't predict. But I guess we'll all feel that way someday. Good luck to everyone out there on this new frontier.

Mentions:#COM#ISP

Never, for no reason mix your working with games and with crypto. I do use dedicated computre with own network (ISP) for gaming, browsing etc, while all crypto shits are on different computers with different networks.

Mentions:#ISP

Soon as you downloaded their game software that was more than likely it, even though you acted quickly to remove it. Best thing you can do is STOP using that machine currently. Here's some things that I'd suggest; Disconnect the infected machine from the internet, move any sensitive files to a USB (can scan the files later from an offline machine) Until then, don't access them on another machine Don't wipe the infected machine (if you plan to have a 3rd party investigate you want to preserve the data) Buy a cheap laptop, use your phones Hotspot to change ALL of your current passwords, make sure 2 Factor Authentication is turned on (change password to that if you can.) Request a new router/cable modem from your ISP Scan all mobile devices/tablets A few things going forward; Get a hardware wallet (Nano Ledger or Trezor) Maybe get a separate device that is only used to access any of your crypto If you haven't already, setup 2FA everywhere Use a separate email for each account, this will make it harder for the bad actor to access other things. Best wishes!

Mentions:#STOP#ISP

What if we look at it from a "pre-internet as *we know it*" standpoint, is the growth similar? Initially the internet was very difficult to setup, had niche uses like sharing research, and if you had spoken to a regularly family they'd have had 0 interest or could imagine any use case for it Then there was a big gap until the 90s and it came to a point where you could call an ISP then they sent a package out and you just plugged it in and it just worked. I guess what I'm saying is... Is it that are we somewhere between the ARPANET and the "home internet/internet for all" stage?

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

The risk for bitcoin is if every government in the world would force every ISP in the world to share all their data an enforce on anyone using the bitcoin protocol. As they can not even agree on saving the world, good luck on them agreeing to fuck bitcoin. Certainly because there is the perverse incentive that if you are one of the few countries allowing it, you are the only one with digital immutable value. Whatever that is worth,... the future will show.

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

More like, not your ISP not your coins!

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Ok I will answer your question with actual logic, which you appear unwilling or incapable of doing. I assume for other blockchains that you consider them to not be “permissionless” (btw a vacuous term, no blockchain meets it because you need an ISP’s permission to do anything on the internet) because their consensus mechanisms are spread over a smaller number of parties and it is possible that they could unite to block specific users or transactions. Has this happened yet? Is the average person worried about not being able to use a particular chain? No. They are de facto permissionless. Since, like I said, in the remittance example you are ramping onto a chain, sending money, then immediately ramping off, you are only exposed to the politics of the chain for a few minutes/hours at most. If a chain starts blocking people, it isn’t likely it is happening at precisely the moment you are using it. Just use a different one next time.

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

In Saito, we believe in openness, not in decentralization. Decentralization is just network topology while openness is that anyone can use the blockchain. Saito offers browser-native decentralised applications. There is no need for third-party extensions like Metamask. All Metamask does is connect to Infura, which runs Ethereum’s peer-to-peer network and forwards transactions to validators. But on Saito, the p2p network is all that there is. All nodes are doing what Infura is doing and you connect to them directly. In Saito, applications are modules which run inside user wallets. When you interface with a website like the [Saito Arcade](https://saito.io/arcade), the ‘website’ is actually a lite-client wallet which runs in the browser. The wallet shows you the application — and when new transactions come in, the wallet updates the application. When you transfer somebody data using Saito, whether you are messaging or playing a game with them, you are operating fully peer-to-peer. “There’s no Facebook, there’s no Google, and there’s no Apple deciding if you can run this game or that game. It’s fully open.” Because Saito is a blockchain, all data which gets put on the chain (for any period of time) gets universally broadcast out to the entire network. This means party A on one side of the earth can put data on the chain, and party B can see it and act based on this data. Off-chain software can listen to the chain and react accordingly. Two parties can interact in a trustless, peer-to-peer manner. For example, users can download a Twitter-like application in their wallet, and use the Saito network to transfer data in a peer-to-peer manner without trusting any third parties. Using public/private key infrastructure, they can ensure that only the intended party (or parties) sees and reads their messages. Similarly, the Saito team has recently developed an alpha version of a trustless [peer-to-peer video chat](https://saito.io/dev/#email-nav-VideoCall) application — like Zoom, but without the company running it. “You can run whatever applications you want, and if you want some free tokens — enough to use the network — why don’t you install this advertising module or that advertising module. And you decide if you want it. You don’t need it. But if you want a little bit of free tokens, then okay, do that. And maybe when you’re using the chain it shows you an ad or asks you to fill out a survey. The advertisers send users tokens, and the users can use those tokens to make transactions. It sounds a bit like Brave, but the difference is there’s no company in the middle — Brave doesn’t exist! There’s no company deciding “you get to advertise, we collect money and give you a little bit of the tokens.” It’s: you decide who you want to deal with because it’s entirely open.” “The beautiful thing about routing work is that all of a sudden, we have a model where: the old internet is ‘advertisers pay Facebook and you pay your ISP. The new internet is ‘the advertisers pay you, and when you do whatever you want to do on the internet, your ISP collects the money because serving you is how they get paid. As Saito grows, the model grows because the values of the fees and values of the transactions grow. So what’s your ISP going to do to get you to use them? Maybe they’re gonna give you a bunch of free off-chain data. Maybe they’re gonna give you liquidity on the lightning network. Maybe they’re gonna give you a free mobile phone number because they’re China Mobile and they’re competing with China Unicom”. — **David Lancashire, Saito Co-Founder, Interview**

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Netconnnnnneeeeeeeeccccctttttttt. Doesn't have the same ring. More like an ISP than a Ponzi

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Lots of ISP lawsuits coming. Consumer internet contracts don’t allow you to use them as a backhaul.

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I have no idea where OP lives, but his ISP can see that he's connected to TOR, so he might get on the radar.

Mentions:#OP#ISP#TOR
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

>All projects begin centralized Why are you moving the goalposts? Algorand is PERMISSIONED. Not all projects start permissioned. Bitcoin didn't start out with the CEO handing out BTC to miners directly. Stop trying to draw this false equivalency, it's not fooling anybody. >Who is lying about what exactly?… I’m getting melodramatic vibes here. If I gave you a cup of tea, and said that you can drink from it, it is cool, and then you took a big sip, and burned your entire mouth and couldn't taste anything for a month, how would you feel? Like you have been lied to? What if I then said "well the tea is being cooled, all tea starts out hot, it takes time, look at this cup of tea that has been sitting here for 2 hours". You either straight out of the gate say that the project is centralized and permissioned right now, and it might not be in the future, or accept the fact that you are a liar, that says stuff like "It’s a permissionless chain", without any self correction or addendum. Saying "It's a permissionless chain" is the equivalent of saying "It's a cool cup of tea". The future posibility of change does not make you any less of a liar, since your statement was made about the present state of the chain. Accept the fact that you have told a lie in order to pump your bags, and move on. >The relays do not participate in consensus so what is the real danger here? The real danger is that the network would be slowed to a crawl or stopped completely, in the moment an important transaction should be processed, by a malicious actor that can profit from that. It's like saying "the engine doesn't participate in the rolling resistance of my car, the wheels do, what's the real danger of having a broken engine?". Just because one part of the network is decentralized, it doesn't mean you can have other parts be centralized, and the whole chain can be called decentralized. This whole "our central point of failure is not on the consensus layer Ha!" point is hilarious, since it's not a denial of the fact that a central point of failure exists, it's just trying to make people that do not understand cryptocurrency think the network is decentralized. >Also anybody can run a relay First of all, no. Just look at the requirements, and tell me what consumer level broadband connection would withstand that type of traffic, without my ISP kicking me off, or throttling me. Meanwhile, as long as I have cheap electricity, running a Bitcoin miner is trivial. Secondly, no I cannot run a relay, because running a relay costs money, and does not produce any rewards whatsoever unless you get explicit permission from the foundation. If Bitcoin miners had to get approved, and Satoshi sent the bitcoin to their address, you would agree that it is a permissioned system, but since it's your baby child Algo, it doesn't have to contend with that criticism. >Validators can still route to any relay (whitelisted or not) Non-whitelisted relays have no incentive to exist, and therefore, will not exist. Nothing in this world is free. We have seen what happens when you have a network infrastructure funded by good will and not by economic incentives -- just look at NANO, and the constant failures it has had. >You’re talking with the confidence that you know what you’re saying, but you’re giving me the impression that you’ve succumb to the Dunning-Kruger effect. I might not have the biggest background in cryptography, or economics, but I am a software engineer, and have been interested and involved in this space since 2016. I have not made any appeals to my credentials, so your attempt at an ad-hominem is completely fellacious. My point stands alone, and the fact that instead of attacking it you would choose to attack me shows even further that you can't attack the actual point.

Mentions:#BTC#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

>but how can you trust a page on the dark net? ​ You don't, you browse .onion domains without javascript because javascript is an attack vector (darknet or no darknet). ​ > https only means the connection is encrypted, I can host a https site with in minutes and when somebody visits it I got the IP. ​ Https means the connection is encrypted, so having a VPN encrypt your connection does nothing. You can indeed host a site and when they visit you get their IP, if the person visiting your site is visiting from their IP address. If you're visiting a .onion domain it's almost impossible for the site operator to know who you are because of how routing works (this is by design). You pick 3 relays and the onion service picks 3 relays (including rendezvous point) for communication. If you use TOR to connect to a regular https site (non onion service) then the site operator will receive the IP of your exit node. ​ >If I have their IP it isn't that hard to start scanning for exploits on their machine. ​ Are you visiting sites that will maliciously use your IP? Why would the attacker use your IP when they've already gotten you to click on a malicious link? It would be easier for them to infect your computer from you visiting the site than trying to use your IP address and pray you have a vulnerability. ​ >In case of Tor and Onion it is a bit harder but as I understand it, if you setup enough relays and somevody would access my relay first without a VPN and a private network I just get theit clear and personal public IP ​ TOR is simply a better version of a VPN (except when it comes to bandwidth). With a VPN you go from your home IP to the first hop (the VPN provider) to the service you're trying to access. With TOR you go from your home IP to your entry guard to a middle relay to an exit node to the service you want to look at. With a VPN you are simply doing one hop and trusting that your VPN company isn't tracking/selling your online data (An unlikely bet, since the US government has been buying up VPN companies for tracking purposes for years). TOR works the same way, but better, with no company that you need to trust, and for free (Essentially free, it's run by a network of volunteers so realistically those volunteering are paying for you by hosting nodes and paying electricity costs). A single node is not enough to compromise your identity either (unlike VPNs which only provide one centralized hop). Being on a VPN does not privatize your browsing. You are simply putting your privacy in the hands of the VPN company instead of your ISP. It's unlikely that it even stops your data from being sent to advertisers, as there is a financial incentive to sell your data and no way to prove that they don't do so (do you really think your $5 a month to nordvpn will convince them to not make more money?) When it comes to security, VPNs are simply worse and unnecessary. Need to hide your IP from sketchy websites? Why aren't you just using TOR? Why are you visiting potentially malicious websites that might be trying to abuse a browser vulnerability? ​ tl;dr TOR is more private than a VPN, more secure than a VPN, more trustless than a VPN, but has worse bandwidth than a VPN. Use TOR for private browsing, use a VPN for... I don't know... watching movies in japan or something.

Mentions:#TOR#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Make it illegal so you can't cash out from cex Make the ISP block IP/internet access of known crypto miners/ POS nodes Start giving fines to all the industry player and force them to burn their crypto

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

You know how the government regulates crypto? Through your ISP.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I literally have a computer that I can’t connect to the internet because I will immediately get an email from my ISP that they detected illegally downloaded files on my device. This happened because I didn’t (and still don’t) know what I was doing. Could I do some research and figure it out? Probably. Could a monkey or old person do it? No.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I don’t think they could enforce a ban on small scale miners, but definitely large scale. They could easily see huge electricity waste. Additionally, your ISP could likely see that you’re mining if you don’t have proper opsec.

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Those are ***HORRIBLE*** numbers.... To assume any kind of attack would be a pure attack is why no one takes these "too decentralized to attack" pieces seriously. Any planned attack will include 0-days in node software, DDOS on specific operations or their ISP, "accidental" BGP route leaks, and a wide variety of other methods. Your graphs and maps don't matter because they don't actually address the real issues.

Mentions:#DDOS#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

> what are the ways of resisting this attack? Externally, I don't mind some rich guy puts my comment https://np.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/x8v9a6/what_really_is_a_bitcoin/inmvyne/?context=3 on the full front-page advertisement of a main stream media, with tons of hack / rug pull / corruption / complicit examples when operators of a money system go for rent seeking due to opaque / secret / cheap practices. Internally, people here shall cancel the hard-coded block size limit so that individual small share miners can claim their mining pool reward once countries are not friendly to mining farms. As design of bitcoin, the profit incentives of the economy will guide mining nodes to decide the block size maximizing block reward and fee with the block orphan probability and politically-safe and fast internet, just like a dark market site operator who carefully tries not to be the number one customer of an ISP or to buy mere 3M bps ADSL for the business needs no artificial limit imposed by software developers.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

Yeah if its connecting to the blockstream satellite - its only useful to mitigate Sybil attacks eg if the government or someone at the ISP level is trying to segregate bitcoin nodes so you literally cant see the longest chain. But other than that its only a read only connection which only keeps your node in sync but you cant make any transactions...soo kind of useless for most people. A Starlink internet connection would actually be useful since you can actually use your bitcoin still

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

That's great value, i pay about $15 / month 20 mbps unlimited and it sux for gaming. An international Satellite Internet access would make that's both efficient and cheap would eliminate all of these private ISP's.

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

We need an International ISP that's both decentralized and you pay for everything with crypto.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

depends on why the "internet shut down". If "internet shut down" because local ISP doesn't work anymore, then starlink + solar may still work. I imagine it may take some reconfiguring overall, but theoretically it would work.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

The internet was never meant to have ISP intermediaries. The first versions of the internet were protocols that were basically peer to peer.

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Stay out of my kitchen and I'll stay out of yours. The movement is inherently political. To achieve anything (even the destruction of state) it's always better to work within existing systems. No anarchist is advocating against using an ISP or AWS to spread information, everyone pays their bills, few play the sovereign citizen card, etc. The left wing oppose social hierarchy and the right wing enforces social hierarchy. Left wing values are more aligned with anarchist values and vice versa. They're both useful idiots to each other. Anyway I'm using an old definition. You're using the new definition, post-anarchy or [post-left anarchy](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contemporary_anarchism#Post-left_anarchy). It's thought of as a more primitivist (living in nature) ideal from my understanding, as some sovereign still needs to enforce/enable something like libertarianism to exist in a real world. If *some lefties* have been misusing the word they've been at it long enough for people to associate it as a leftwing movement when I first read about it decades ago. When I think of anarchy the first thing that comes to mind are labor unions fighting for workers rights (which lead to anti-capatalism, more marxism, and inevitably anti-state). I never think of true *individuals* like John Gacy or rebels who lived in a bubble, even if by definition they may align with *anarchy* more than anyone. If workers have rights they're free to choose their work, or to not work at all if they really wish. Even if a lefty paid half our living expenses using corporate tax it would help any individual divorce from the status quo a lot quicker. There's not a realistic way to achieve one without first enabling it. Each book on it defines it differently as it is an individualists ideology at heart. After the labor movement I don't know what people have written, so everything I just said is probably irrelevant now. I do get the core value is *anti-state* but 'why' is often just as important.

Mentions:#ISP#AWS
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

p/e is only part of the picture, though, and their price can go up despite having a high p/e for various reasons like future earnings and growth. say an ISP that is rapidly expanding their fiber network. while the cost is pretty great and may impact their earnings, but once they are done building out their network, the cost is pretty much in the network build and any future revenue is nearly all profit. that said, you are correct, the larger picture means the market still likely has further down to go, but on a day-to-day basis there will still be green days...at the moment this looks like one of them but who knows where we end up.

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

In your mind, what's the purpose of staking? In response to your concerns; Hardware costs are minimal and if you go above minimum spec then you will likely not ever need to replace it, save for physical damage. Many clients allow pruning to remove old data and save disk space. In the future you will be able to run a light client, and this reduces the hardware requirements even more and you won't need to worry about bloat. As silly as it sounds, it's easy when you know how. There are lot's of useful guides out there that help you step by step. There's also a strong community that can help troubleshoot issues with you. What's more, things such as Rocket Pools smartnode exist which make it even more user friendly - all you need is a few Linux commands. Having a decent ISP is important, however this more than pays for itself. Ultimately, as long as your uptime is more than your downtime, you will be profitable, however minimising any potentially inactivity penalties means you get more ETH. Pay USD monthly today to receive more ETH rewards to be sold at a higher price tomorrow. You can use Tails to monitor your validator remotely. It won't help if something goes wrong, but you will at least know that things haven't gone wrong. If you're 'validator' gets stolen, then nothing happens so long as your keys are compromised. You buy a new piece of hardware and import your keys. Yes this would be hassle, but what's the likelihood of it occurring? What's more is that second time round it's a breeze.

Mentions:#ISP#ETH
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

For me the real barrier is the technology. It’s easier to sit on my ETH than 1) buy and maintain hardware (that is destined by design to run out of capacity), 2) learn how to download, tweak, and maintain the validator software, and 3) pay for an ISP that won’t have outages. Also I have to get a sitter while on vacation (cat sitters that can troubleshoot a validator anyone?). Also, house gets broken into and your validator gets stolen? I know it can be restored, but let’s not fool ourselves about how much of a hassle that would be.

Mentions:#ETH#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

Try https://www.privacyguides.org/, note that VPN doesn't "decentralize" anything, you're merely shifting the trust from your ISP to the VPN provider. Sure, dVPN would claim they're decentralizing, but if people are concerned about Tor nodes being run by govt agencies, why wouldn't govt agencies also run dVPN nodes which would provide extra revenue?

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Of course it can. Private tab doesn't log your browser history and has some different cookie settings ,but it does nothing to prevent you from getting hacked. It also doesn't prevent your ISP, Employer(work devices) or a hacker from seeing your traffic. For that get a good VPN or use Tor network. If you want good info on how to protect you privacy online: check out the EFF https://www.eff.org/issues/privacy

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I am excited about projects like #3Air which tends to Build a robust IoT platform for ISPs and also change how telecom services are consumed. They will become the world’s first blockchain-based ISP platform 🔥

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I love making researches about Web3 projects. I stumbled on #3air, they have the interest of Africans in mind. They’re focused on creating an easy-to-use system for acquiring ISP services.

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

>The US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit has ruled that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can be sued by a taxpayer for collecting private financial information about his use of virtual currency from third-party exchanges without a lawful subpoena. Here is my question. How would you know? Like unless if you work at one of these exchanges. How would you know 1. There is even a subpoena 2. If it is lawful or not Like 2 maybe you can use a lawyer IF YOU CAN AFFORD ONE. But the gov collects crap tons of info on people between ISP and other places. Any you never hear about it. In fact, Yahoo got screwed with this by the secret courts when they openly talked about what was going on.

Mentions:#ONE#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Maybe logging into a different PC in a location you trust? I know it seems random but the ISP change may just push the Reddit algorithm with a stick

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I'm not talking about not having energy for years (then the question bitcoin Vs cash is the least of our concerns), but more something along the lines of a small power outage or an ISP having a temporary hickup.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

Around the same time, the largest ISP in Canada lost its network for many hours. Bitcoin didn't notice

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

I'm a bit of a privacy nerd, and NordVPN ended up being a no-go for me because it wouldn't accept [a masked credit card](https://finance.yahoo.com/news/masked-credit-card-203000082.html) -- it insisted I was doing fraud. And that was enough to get me to write them off. A VPN requires total trust, as they replace your ISP and always knows your IP addresses. You only have their word. And that was such a bad start.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

No problem. I'm still looking into how this could be a real issue. I could be wrong, but I'm coming to the conclusion that there would need to be a catastrophic and permanent complete failure of the entire global internet infrastructure, across global ISP's, (even satellite comms), for bitcoin to become fubar'd. And in the process of going through such an event, I think we have bigger problems :). Good luck to us all, should we experience such a thing. Need to spend more time learning gardening and fishing I think.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

Not when the claim you're making is the speed of it, would you make a claim of a new video codec transcoding faster than another, when the "faster" one was also conveniently on a newer faster phone with a 5G connection vs a older model with an LTE one? I used to install / upgrade POS systems, and many upgrades were purely for speed, same ISP, same merchant, only the terminal itself changed. It absolutely makes a difference, this example gave a difference withing seconds, completely ignorable.

Mentions:#LTE#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

Have you configured a port forward on your ISP router to allow inbound connections? If you are running on Windows have you added a Windows firewall rule to allow the traffic in?

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

What OS ? Lubuntu is a really light Linux distro on my MacBook If you can leave IOS. You can definitely run bitcoin core. Can't really speak on lighting because it's so many different ways to do it. If you can use the CLI then you absolutely can. I've done it. Do you have unlimited data ? You should be fine with a btc "standard" node, it's data heavy. Relative to DSL. Lightning is based on channels and connections. You should be fine. But your ISP might murder you if your not unlimited.

Mentions:#OS#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

It’s not about taking control of your device, more accessing important information you send. The reason you pay for a VPN is to entrust that they constantly adapt and change encryption and data safety. Their main priority is that, and if they can’t then they aren’t that good. There are some videos I’ve seen about ISP’s being able to decode data sent to a VPN to ensure what you’re doing isn’t illegal. But I cannot say for sure that this is true. I’m a strong believer that everything we do is recorded, logged and analysed, by whoever, doesn’t really bother me. Any ‘technology’ we have access too is behind what it actually is. The fact people can back door computer webcams on a private connection without being noticed is a testimony to that. If they’re interested in me posting my dogs photos everywhere then go for it haha We only get more secure when someone finds a way to get around the security. Thus the whole challenges to fine exploits for financial rewards larger companies do. I say I’d they access my wallet, they should also take my debt. That should scare them off haha

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I really hope one day we will have ISP or network level detection or banning of email, SMS, phone calls spoofings. With current technology, it is not hard at all to implement.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

Your examples exist in rather narrow scopes of time, population, and thought. Sure, this believable and fairly uncommon occurrence may fit your backwoods/mid-desert perspective...but there is a whole wide world out there, friend; one that is overwhelmingly connected via a network of phones and computers and satellites and digital transactions. I'm confused as to whether your argument pertains to a mass failure of an industry comprised of some of the wealthiest corporations, in which scenario you posit we would need paper money....or if you are arguing that when the local backwoods ISP fails that we should all have a $20 bill so we can purchase beer-wine-lotto at the QuikStop. Perhaps I am entertaining a troll.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

The more nodes there are the longer it takes for transactions and blocks to fully propagate, so no, blindly adding nodes is not good no matter what If your node is colocated with 1000 other nodes in the same region on the same ISP, the only way it is adding to decentralization is if it is either mining, or adding some form of economic impact via its use as a transactional medium

Mentions:#ISP
r/CryptoCurrencySee Comment

Yeah AWS is huge. Also to access anything you have to go through an ISP which is controlled by some other megacorp Decentralization is a meme

Mentions:#AWS#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I think the recent internet outage in [Canada](https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/08/rogers-network-outage-across-canada-hit-banks-businesses-and-consumers.html) showed just how vulnerable bitcoin could be to ISP monopolies. The telecom giants have the power to read/block transactions at will, so unless the entire network starts using Tor etc there's a potentially a large hole.

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

Unlikely on a global scale. Here's some extreme (*and highly unlikely*) measures just in the US they could do to make it really difficult for US citizens to use: 1. **Outright ban it.** Won't stop it, but will cause a serious impediment to further adoption; institutional money is gone. 2. **Tax the $hit out of it.** Won't stop bitcoin either, but will make it impractical for institutional money to adopt, and impact adoption / practical exchange of it. 3. **Impose mandatory & severe surveillance.** Won't stop bitcoin either, but would likely make it really difficult to use; for those not familiar with mixers/tor/etc... the learning curve will be even more difficult. 4. **Mandate ISP's block bitcoin internet traffic.** (Theoretically technically possible...?) US government could mandate rules that all ISP's monitor and block any traffic related to known bitcoin use (TCPIP/UDP ports, known miners, known exchanges, etc...) 5. **Propagate an unbelievable negative communications campaign.** Spend billions of dollars campaigning '*bitcoin is bad*' to US and global audiences across every medium that will sell them ad space. Those that are not informed otherwise may just believe it enough to stifle bitcoin adoption in a serious manner. Good luck to us all if any of those even remotely becomes a thing. Yikes...

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I pay with Bitcoin if the merchant accepts Bitcoin. Too few merchants accept Bitcoin. I boycott any merchant who "accepts Bitcoin" via BitPay or one of the other middleman parasites. My ISP accepts Bitcoin, but with a 8% premium. I'm waiting for the ISP to fix that pricing error

Mentions:#ISP
r/BitcoinSee Comment

I dont know what ISP you have, but no data cap here in florida.

Mentions:#ISP