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Reddit Posts

Web3 Unstoppable Domains Cyber Monday Deal

Now is a good time to get a web3 domain

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The Bitcoin Maximalist perspective for non-maxis - a metered perspective. Please read before commenting.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

A Web3 Messaging App For Web3 Users. Launch & Test Idea . Can You Support Me?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

So what are the coins that are connected closely to Alameda and FTX?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

A list of Web3 alternatives to popular Web2 services [OC]

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

FTX Now Allows You To Send Crypto To Emails Or Phone Numbers, With A Catch. Also Receive Crypto And Fiat With An FTX User Tag

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Crypto Investment Firm Recommends Oryen (ORY), Ethereum Name Service (ENS), Nem (XEM), And Cardano (ADA)

r/BitcoinSee Post

ENS domain !!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Are moons sent to a ENS or basic eth address recoverable ? If these are I will award 100 moons to the first to give me a correct answer.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How to prepare for future airdrops

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Seeking advice and a warning to others: Accused of money laundering because of deposit from public ENS address to Coinbase

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Seeking advice: Accused of money laundering and fired after depositing to Coinbase from ENS address

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ENS VS Unstoppable Domains - A comparison

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Crypto Twitter’s hunt for the next 1000x altcoin names QNT, ENS, MKR as Top 3

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Three reasons why you should hook up your .com domain to ENS

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Three reasons why you should hook up your .com domain to ENS

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Three reasons why you should buy an ENS domain name

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

With ENS domains gaining traction as THE web3 identity, Ethmojis (or .eth addresses containing emojis) are like blockchain pfp's. Owning emojis on the blockchain are increasingly having more value/use-case.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

BTC has bottomed and here are the Alts I'm in: ENS, UNI, LINK

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What happened this week in Bitcoin? Overview of news.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Be aware of a new scam going on: bakery-ens.org

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Why did you get into crypto?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Will ENS reach $150? Price prediction for 2030 revealed

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Potentially the oldest NFT on Ethereum has been rediscovered and it's a Domain Name Registrar.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Potentially the oldest NFT on Ethereum has been rediscovered and it's a Domain Name Registrar.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

A Domain Name Registrar deployed in 2015 on Ethereum has been rediscovered and has 100K names registered in the last 24 hours.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Potentially the oldest NFT on Ethereum has been rediscovered and it's a Domain Name Registrar.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Get your free Coinbase ENS domain with - Guide to simplify your wallet address

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Patriots.eth just sold for 75 eth. Tell me you are still not bullish on ENS domains once again.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Web3 Watch: NFTs Return to Minecraft, Coinbase Provides ENS Usernames

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Coinbase to hand out ENS usernames to simplify wallet transactions

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Which airdrops are you looking forward to right now?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Full DNS namespace integration to ENS now on Mainnet (ENS domains can now end in .com/.org/.net)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Full DNS namespace integration to ENS now on Ethereum Mainnet (ENS domains can now end in .com/.org/.net)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Full DNS namespace integration to ENS now on Ethereum Mainnet (ENS domains can now end in .com/.org/.net)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ENS Creator Sues GoDaddy Over Expired Domain

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Ethereum Founder Vitalik Buterin Proposes Recurring fees on ENS Domains

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

moneynft.eth - ENS: Ethereum Name Service

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Recieved strange token in my wallet?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

GoDaddy Sued For Auctioning Off Eth.Link ENS Domain

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Should there be demand-based recurring fees on ENS domains?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Company behind Ethereum Name Service (ENS) files lawsuit against GoDadddy over domain sale

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Coinbase is funding a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Treasury Department’s sanctions of Tornado Cash smart contracts

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ENS domain name sales SPIKE ahead of the Merge

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ENS should offer a holding cell for people to send things to unregistered ENS names.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Why is Trading Volume for ENS Domains Surging?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

HandShake vs Unstoppable Domains Vs DecentraWeb vs ENS - A Quick Comparison (3 cryptos)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Announcement - crushballs.click - Small crypto webshop opening today

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The web3 "decentralized" .eth ENS (Ethereum Name Service) will go offline soon. The owner, Virgil Griffin, is currently in prison for aiding North Korean officials with money laundering. eth.link will expire September 5th

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Eth.link is set to go offline as GoDaddy disallows any other person to renew it.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Bro, what is going on with these crypto exchanges

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Ethereum Name Service (ENS) Guide

r/CryptoMoonShotsSee Post

Web3 Ens

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ENS Domains Surpass Two Million in Record-Breaking Quarter

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Someone has been buying Reddit NFTs on OpenSea

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Time to shut down ENS, this guy won

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Remember when Uniswap founder's bank account was shut down by JP Morgan Chase without explanation and how he complained on Twitter? Well, how the turntables... Now Uniswap is blocking all addresses linked to Tornado Cash.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ENS domains are the way toward P2P transaction adoption.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Loopring - Important Layer 2 partner according to Ethereum.org

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How will ENS domain names fit into reddit's web3 adoption?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What is your personal Bitcoin Pizza moment?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

NFTs don't have to be just "worthless JPEGs"

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Billionaire investor Mark Cuban says buying land in the metaverse is the "dumbest shit ever." Do you agree?

r/CryptoCurrenciesSee Post

Billionaire investor Mark Cuban says buying land in the metaverse is the "dumbest shit ever." Do you agree?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

What is Ethereum Name Service (ENS) And How Does It Work?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Ethereum merge is going to be the game changer we have been waiting for.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The latest price of Ethereum Name Service (ENS) is $15.79 with a 24-hour volume of $152,893,728. The price of ENS is down -3.28% in the past 24 hours

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

What is Ethereum Name Service (ENS) & Why does it Matter?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Anybody have any ENS domains?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

mcguigan.eth - ENS: Ethereum Name Service

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Amazon.eth ENS domain owner disregards 1M USDC buyout offer on OpenSea

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

100e loss on an ENS domain gag. NGMI.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Ethereum Name Service collector buys sony.eth ENS for $72,000

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Amazon.eth ENS domain owner rejected $1M offer on Opensea.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Amazon.eth ENS domain owner disregards 1M USDC buyout offer on Opensea

r/SatoshiStreetBetsSee Post

Amazon.eth ENS domain owner disregards 1M USDC buyout offer on Opensea

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Ethereum Name Service collector buys sony.eth ENS for $72,000

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

💎i-am-rich.eth on sale💎 A chance to own one of the rarest flex worthy ENS domains. Now on Sale on OpenSea.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Kyiv Ethereum ENS domain for sale

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How do you navigate to Web-3 NFT domains?

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Low number ENS

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

Bought My First ENS Domain

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Any theory’s on Coinbase Top movers algorithm?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

The First Single Digit ENS NFT - ‘1‘.eth

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

We, the Financial Revolutionaries. (plus crypto daily recap)

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

ENS Domain Name “000.eth” Was Sold for 300 ETH – crypto.news

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Brainstorming the next wave of crypto scams

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Join creative nrainstorming the next wave of cryptoscams

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

These ENS names are getting out of hand!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Is anyone anticipating more airdrops?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Transpose Open Alpha — Free high-level Ethereum data API launched

r/CryptoMarketsSee Post

‘Smart Money’ Is Staking ETH on Rocket Pool and Selling ENS, Nansen Data Suggests. I'm also considered the "smart money". I have staked all of my ETH to date. I plan to buy 10 more to 150 ETH for staking to year 2030!!! GLTA!!!

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

At this point of your crypto career are you investing or are you invested?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

JUST IN: Coinbase is partnering with ENS allowing people to claim ENS id within Coinbase Wallet

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Wallet idea, ... that can increase adoption ???.

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

How do you solve the anxiety of sending tokens to the wrong address?

r/CryptoCurrencySee Post

Latest Week in Ethereum News: mainnet shadow fork 3 almost perfect; ENS one million names created; Foundry Anvil local testnet node

r/SatoshiStreetBetsSee Post

Record-high surge in Ethereum Name Service domains triggers 90% rally in ENS

r/SatoshiStreetBetsSee Post

4-digit ENS domains spike in demand this week and continue soaring

Mentions

They aren't wrong. They aren't talking about crypto in general, they are talking about specifically Bitcoin and everything they say is true. Bitcoin is a terrible payment network, it cannot scale because it is not programmable, the network does not earn any substantial form of revenue for providing services (because it can't scale and has no internal use cases so fee revenue remains small), you can't use BTC productively for anything so it is not a commodity (no smart contracts, NFTs, ENS, etc.), its security mechanism will leave it susceptible to attack once the halvenings reduce block rewards to a point where it is no longer financial economical to mine (hash power goes down), its consensus mechanism requires enormous physical resources and is a non negligible contributor to climate change, so the only social good Bitcoin provides is as a "store of value", whatever that means.

Mentions:#BTC#ENS

Does anyone have a ELI5 step by step guide on getting Ethereum off coinbase and to a ledger nano s plus? Also have AMP and Atom on coinbase as well that I want to get off there and on my ledger. I did send $5 from coinbase to my ENS address as a test (didn’t want to send all my ethereum) and I think I did it right. It shows $5 eth under my ethereum account on the ledger live program. Is this now on my nano or is there something else I need to do? Sorry if I sound like a complete imbecile about this.

Mentions:#AMP#ENS

LOL. I will send my resume as a transaction using this ENS. employment 100%

Mentions:#ENS

I did not know ENS was run by a DAO. That’s amazing!

Mentions:#ENS#DAO

I also don't mind this either because the ENS names are ran by a DAO. The only way to change stuff in the DAO is with a vote, and that takes a majority. It's not some group of people just changing stuff at will. They DID do that until they setup the DAO, now it's the people that decide.

Mentions:#ENS#DAO

ENS is superior. If you wanna get an address get an .eth one.

Mentions:#ENS

Unstoppable is completely centralized. If you want a web 3 domain, get an ENS or just don't get one at all.

Mentions:#ENS

Google.com is one of the most popular sites. I don't think there was anyone that owned Google.com before Google. My point is, outside of obvious ones like beach.x or Space.x. I don't see how owning the domain is a problem. (update: also with ENS you can register your domain for hundreds of years. Your problem of no one having access to it still exist) ​ >unstoppable domains is a for profit company just selling as many domains as they can to make a quick buck whereas ens is decentralized and is governed by the dao. > > imo unstoppable domains wont be around in a couple of years Time will tell. Like I think they both will be around in a couple years. I have problems with Unstoppable Domains. But it's mostly with how they have a ton of endings and no clear guidance. Plus they jacked up the prices. But Unstoppable does have far more features than ENS and is working deals with more places than ENS. Plus gas fees

Mentions:#ENS

I'm sorry if this is a bit of a stupid question but where would one go in order to get a legit domain from ENS? Is their app any good and is it easy to connect the domain to one of my wallets? Thanks in advance!

Mentions:#ENS

Only on unstoppable domains, they also reserve certain domains for companies or celebritys to purchase. On ENS pricing is the same for anything, all based on character count. Everything above five characters cost $5 a year + gas

Mentions:#ENS

I have both an ens domain and a UD nft domain. I think both have their pros and cons. I like that UD starts their addresses on polygon. I’m a tad scatter brained so I can make all sorts of changes to my domain as I think of them, with out paying the eth gas every time. On the other hand UD has shown that they’re anything but “unstoppable”. I don’t like renting my ENS, I’d rather own it. But I’m not going to pretend I know how this works, maybe I’m renting my UD domain too and don’t know it yet. I’m also slightly concerned that somewhere down the line Ethiopia is going to start using their ICANN domain and kick all of us using .eth off their shit. I know their government said they won’t, but a government is an ever changing entity and we can’t know they’ll keep the same mentality they’ve got now, forever.

Mentions:#ENS

You can pay for as many years as you want up front, I've got Odlavso.eth for 10 years. Paying an annual registration fee serves two purposes. You can't sit on a domains name forever, If you die eventually the domain name will become available again. Provides steady funds for the ENS foundation to continue to develop ENS. Besides

Mentions:#ENS

My main problem with ENS, is that you down own it either. It’s a yearly rental. Maybe I don’t know enough about how domains work, but I hate paying rent on my ENS.

Mentions:#ENS

# ENS is better. ENS is a decentralized domain name service, unstoppable domains is a for profit domain name service which sells anything they think they can make a profit off of including domain names they don't own.

Mentions:#ENS

I forget that ENS is distributed as ERC-721. Definitely the best use case out there so far. Others exist, but are fairly niche at the moment. NFTs are for nerds/collectors until then.

Mentions:#ENS

you think ENS is entirely useless?

Mentions:#ENS

Your metamask, if not connected to your ledger, will be storing a completely different address, so no you won't be able to use your ENS name on your metamask wallet, if it is indeed a completely separate wallet. If you link the two, you'll be able to do what you're saying, but your ledger is still at-risk if someone is able to phish your on-chain signature for approval. It provides another security layer, but if you don't plan on interacting with any smart contracts, you won't be able to link the two. Otherwise you would be interacting with smart contracts on metamask, but having to do the approval manually on your ledger.

Mentions:#ENS

Quick Q for those in the know - I own an ENS name on MetaMask but have recently purchased a ledger. I don't want to hook my Ledger up to any smart contracts for obvious reasons, but can I store ownership of the NFT on my ledger (for safety against smart contract hacking) but control it via MetaMask? Essentially the name stays with me in my ledger, but if anyone tries to drain metamask it'll be limited to metamask only? so only my hot funds not my entire portfolio. Thanks

Mentions:#ENS

ENS Domains did it first.

Mentions:#ENS

Decentralized layer similar to ENS. Instead of a address you use a name.

Mentions:#ENS

Unless we have sth like ENS how do we know that 0.009 btc of mine is mine alone?. Binance trying to be hero like SBF and FTX

Mentions:#ENS#FTX

Why would I mention you? I providing evidence that the above accounts are matched to the same person. Cant post the link, But use the names above as ENS domains in breadcrumbs app and follow away.

Mentions:#ENS

I always saw one of those accounts bashing Cardano, so I looked into it. Found out he has those user names as ENS domains and they link up. 1. Can't post the breadcrumb link here. u/nelsonmckey is his main account and the others are the troll accounts.

Mentions:#ENS

Aave (borrow/lending) Uniswap (automated market maket) Curve (stablecoin automated market maker) USDC (centralized dollar backed stablecoin, first released on ETH) Frax (decentralized crypto collateralized stablecoin) OpenSea (NFT marketplace) ENS (name service for ethereum) dydx/synthetix (perps, options) zkSync/Arbitrum/Starknet (zero knowledge proofs)

Mentions:#USDC#ETH#ENS

Test transactions are entirely pointless, just check the address and the gas, or use an ENS

Mentions:#ENS

Probably something akin to ENS domains for simplicity instead of addresses. Still, it is not hard to copy and paste lol

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z29in1/daily_general_discussion_november_23_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z1empq/daily_general_discussion_november_22_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

Easy to use. Has cross chain functionality. Able to store / view NFTs. Has a web3 browser. Accepts and utilizes ENS domains. Can swap and bridge, but expensive. Otherwise a pretty good wallet.

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z1empq/daily_general_discussion_november_22_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

Same here. Only "made" about ~$20k in ENS / Uniswap coin airdrops that I was actually able to transfer out to eth/BTC/USDT then fiat without losing much. I feel more than satisfied if I don't participate again except watch from the sidelines. :popcorn:

Mentions:#ENS#BTC#USDT

Some ENS goes above 10ETH.

Mentions:#ENS#ETH

Just doubled down into ENS. My main portfolio: eth, btc, link, ENS, matic. What about you guys, what are your bull bets?

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/z0jm96/daily_general_discussion_november_21_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/yzpxap/daily_general_discussion_november_20_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

I'm joking. I 100% got into crypto for the technology. Because I was weary of app stores and credit card companies stealing such a large percentage of revenue from small businesses and innovators. It seemed like a way to empower "the little people", while at the same time service providers like AWS were dreadfully crushing all competition, centralizing services, all at the expense of everyone else, while a select few Bezos and Musks of the world were benefiting from centralization. After a while, after seeing our government and central bankers oppress and outright attack the working class, by devaluing our wages and entire lifetimes of savings, orchestrating the same tactics decade after decade, which obviously greatly enriched the wealthiest and themselves, I started to question why anyone ever trusted tamperable currencies, old money, deprecated money that has no actual value or even features that help people. I then realized the only solution, which millions are now working on, is to inseparably entangle next generation services and the concept of currency into algorithmically encoded, incentivized, decentralized, and rewarding platforms. I settled on Ethereum. The technology stack is easy. BUT, it is only recently, that it's become clear they will come out on top. They successfully cut their energy usage by 99%, and the next updates will absolutely crush credit card companies, payment processors, by creating scalable transactions rates that blow the old middlemen out of the water. As for other tokens, entangled in services, I mostly work with platforms where I've researched not only their economics, but the individuals and tooling and tech stacks behind them. ANY coin or tech stack, that cannot be picked up by developers in an evening, or is backed by anonymous unseen founders, is shit to me. They are fairly easy to spot, they stink of it, and look like it from a code and architecture perspective, but also from their soft and unproven wishful or outright lying "tokenomics". But I suppose more than anything, I simply don't have the time. So, I remain centered on ETH. I use GRT for GraphQL-like queries, ENS for domain names, and because of a single 30 minute so-easy to create NFT, I tried XTZ and favored it over the arduous stacks and steps to creating other platform's NFTs. SOL piqued my interests for about a week because transaction costs were reasonable, but I've fair confidence that once ETH future updates address the transaction rates and more, I'll spend no time building upon other platforms.

You might wanna look into ENS domains. That’s where value is. Vitaliks favorite NFTs btw. They have actual utility. 3 digit 4 digit Common first names/last names Single ethmojis These are the top dog categories. They haven’t really been effected by the bear market and have only been growing steadily month after month for awhile now.

Mentions:#ENS

Shit I could have told you that given that it’s a ENS domain created as of about a week ago. I was just waiting for that donation button to pop up… *son of a bitch*

Mentions:#ENS

Good morning love, cup of Joe to start your day? ☕️ how about a crypto or two? ENS perhaps?

Mentions:#ENS

Anyone have a list of which exchanges can or can’t send ETH to an ENS address? I tried Gemini and it was a no go…

Mentions:#ETH#ENS

Its basically layer 2. So you use wallet of satoshi with 0.3 % network fee. Q. How can you be sure you are sending to a lightning invoice address, as opposed to an address not on that network. If that would mistakenly happen-couldn’t you lose those funds? Also is there a way to pay for a name service like ENS.

Mentions:#ENS

tldr; Nexo is set to launch its own non-custodial, EVM-compatible smart wallet dubbed ‘The Nexo Wallet’ The wallet will also function as an identity wallet, allowing users to use Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) and the Ethereum Name Service (ENS) to build up, and utilize the benefits of their self-governed Web *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*

Mentions:#EVM#ENS#DYOR

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/yy5ofm/daily_general_discussion_november_18_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

What's ENS?

Mentions:#ENS

Self-governed wallet, identity wallet, allowing us to use NFTs and the ENS to build up, and utilize the benefits of ours self-governed Web3 profile, this is DeFi at it's best.

Mentions:#ENS

Self-governed wallet, identity wallet, allowing us to use NFTs and the ENS to build up, and utilize the benefits of ours self-governed Web3 profile, this is DeFi at it's best.

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/yxakfo/daily_general_discussion_november_17_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

I've been very active in the NFT community, but I've now lost hope in it. The ENS scene definitely has potential but in this market even ENS names are not doing great.

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/yxakfo/daily_general_discussion_november_17_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/ywdu9s/daily_general_discussion_november_16_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

This article = makes me wanna buy more ENS

Mentions:#ENS

Anybody wanna help my ENS is 100up.eth

Mentions:#ENS

I'm not sure if this is mentioned in any of the replies here but there are things being developed right now that have the potential to improve adoption with self custody. One of them is account abstraction which is a smart contract as a wallet. It supports email/sms recovery, no seed phrases, and multi-sig social recovery. Then there are also domain names like ENS to avoid typos. What could this end up looking like? Think PayPal, Cash App but with self-custody.

Mentions:#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/ytmecs/daily_general_discussion_november_13_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

From [ftxvictimsalliance.eth] to [FTX drainer account]? What’s the victims alliance ENS?

Mentions:#FTX#ENS

I got a free ENS name (.cb.id) by using their self-custody wallet, that's pretty sweet.

Mentions:#ENS

True, but only if you don’t use DeFi or never send funds to other people. Those can very easily figure your deposit address (extra hop or not) out and that’s not always great I have a “personal wallet” deposit address on FTX and my personal wallet only ever deposits onto that one. It’s separated from stuff like DeFi, (which has its own DeFi deposit address), or other wallets that have ENS domains for example Anyway, FTX left a hole :(

Mentions:#FTX#ENS

#Privacy Con-Arguments Below is an argument written by MrMoustacheMan which won 1st place in the Privacy Con-Arguments topic for a prior [Cointest](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_policy) round. > #Privacy - Con Argument > > *Reusing my previous entry [from here](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/pfoprn/rcc_cointest_general_concepts_privacy/hf4xibt/)* > > This is a tricky topic to interpret - should the argument be the downside of privacy itself? Or should it discuss the shortcomings of cryptocurrency in protecting our privacy? > > - As I outlined in [the Privacy - Pro thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6sx7i/general_concepts_round_privacy_proarguments/hofaxtz/), > > - [Privacy is a fundamental human right](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_privacy) and central to [the original ideals of cryptocurrency](https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/manifesto.htm) . > - Privacy depends on - *but is not the same as* - [transparency and security](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/02/what-is-privacy-in-the-age-of-digital-transformation/). > > ##Limits of privacy > > - Not everyone values privacy all the time or in the same way: > > - People say they value privacy but don't protect their data ([privacy paradox](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585317302022)). > > - Or, they [weigh their privacy against getting something in return](https://martech.org/report-gen-z-millennials-more-willing-to-give-up-personal-data-in-exchange-for-personalized-experiences/). > > - And, as [arguments from users in the Monero Con thread](https://np.reddit.com/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/og17m0/rcryptocurrency_cointest_rcc_top_favorites/) indicate, people can react negatively to privacy if it facilitates criminal activity. > > - We can also think of some cases where - rightly or wrongly - [society limits individual privacy for the benefit of the public](https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu\/article/the-limits-of-privacy/): > > - Despite [issues with sex offender registries](https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/376668-the-sex-offender-registry-vengeful-unconstitutional-and-due-for-full), [Megan's law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan%27s_Law) and related regulations exist in many jurisdictions because - supposedly - the public good they offer [outweighs individual rights to privacy](https://www.hrw.org/reports/2007/us0907/10.htm). > > - National security was prioritized over individual privacy by passing the infamous [Patriot Act](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act#Title_II:_Enhanced_surveillance_procedures), which greatly expanded the US government's ability to wiretap and surveil citizens. > - Elected officials are individuals whose [right to privacy is limited because of the public good](https://www.ncsl.org/bookstore/state-legislatures-magazine/yes-no-maybe-so-do-legislators-have-a-right-to-privacy.aspx). They are often compelled to disclose private financial information to [ensure against conflicts of interest](https://www.npr.org/2021/09/27/1041059924/2-top-federal-reserve-officials-retire-after-trading-disclosures). > > ##Public ledgers > > - What about crypto and privacy? It's not hard to imagine blockchain technology facilitating some limits to privacy: > - E.g., no need to [wait 45 days](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STOCK_Act) to see what [moves politicians make in the stock market](https://www.quiverquant.com/sources/senatetrading) if every trade is on chain. You'd be able to see in real time that [senators were dumping their holdings while downplaying coronavirus](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/richard-burr-stocks-sold-coronavirus.html\)). > - The transparent and immutable nature of blockchain networks can thus work to undermine privacy: > > > "[the design features of a blockchain network that make it such a useful tool for data security actually make it problematic for privacy](https://www.nhbr.com/when-blockchain-meets-data-privacy-and-security/)." > > >"[Bitcoin is only semi-private; the protocol doesn’t know your real name but transactions can still be linked to you in a myriad of ways.](https://medium.com/human-rights-foundation-hrf/privacy-and-cryptocurrency-part-i-how-private-is-bitcoin-e3a4071f8fff)" > > - Blockchain analytics firms ([like Chainanalysis](https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/26/chainalysis-doubles-valuation-to-2-billion-with-benioff-backing.html)) specialize in deanonymizing crypto activity and sell this data to corporations and law enforcement agencies. > > - And sometimes privacy crumbles in surprising ways - [Decrypt journalists were able to use Ethereum's ENS to doxx individuals and even discover their physical locations](https://decrypt.co/19423/we-tracked-133000-ethereum-names-and-exposed-their-secrets). > > - Additionally, it's difficult to [reconcile immutable public ledgers with data privacy regulation](https://www.davispolk.com/sites/default/files/blockchain_technology_data_privacy_issues_and_potential_mitigation_strategies_w-021-8235.pdf): > > - You can't erase your history on the blockchain - this simple fact "[defies the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which says that all users have the right to be “forgotten”—i.e. the fact that I shopped for a certain book title on Amazon should not exist in the data ether forever.](https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2019/05/08/could-blockchain-solve-our-growing-privacy-issue/)" > > - While the persistence of your data on chain may not differ from a centralized database (no doubt Amazon 'remembers' everything you do), its accessibility/transparency for the world to see is much greater. > > - Lastly, depending on how integrated blockchain becomes into our lives, the infrastructure creates risk of misuse - you may trust blockchain security to keep your funds safu, but not trust actors who can use it for surveillance purposes: > > - For example, [Charles Hoskinson expressed his reservations](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQf7TtA7U4) in explaining why Cardano would not support a 'vaccine passport' system as the VeChain and Icon teams did: > > > “[my deep concern is that such infrastructure, if it is used to restrict the freedom of movement, be a denial mechanism, will inevitably be used by those who have more totalitarian thoughts](https://cardanofeed.com/cardano-ada-gives-unequivocal-no-to-vaccine-passports-for-these-reasons-8330.html)” > > - I'm not saying that public chains will inevitably evolve into a [Social Credit System](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Credit_System) - but we shouldn't pretend that decentralized or transparent systems naturally protect us from oppression and surveillance. ***** Would you like to learn more? [Click here](/r/CointestOfficial/comments/r6syvm/general_concepts_round_privacy_conarguments/) to be taken to the original topic-thread or you can scan through the [Cointest archive](/r/CointestOfficial/wiki/cointest_archive#wiki_Privacy) to find arguments on this topic in other rounds. Since this is a con-argument, what could be a better time to promote the Skeptics Discussion thread? You can find the latest thread [here](/r/CryptoCurrency/comments/yqzprc/daily_general_discussion_november_10_2022_gmt0/).

Mentions:#ENS

BTC is still alive. ETH transitioned to POS and had its first deflationary day. Polygon is opening the world to Web 3.0. Eth sidechains like Arbitrum are seeing great success. Decentralized social identity ownership like ENS is thriving. Stani from Aave built an awesome new decentralized social media called Lens. DAI is still here. Some centralized idiots fucked up again. They will be cleansed soon. As for the rest of us, I think we’ll be ok.

Bought at 18,2k, it fell to 17,2k .. Bought also ENS at 15,3 following Bollinger bands, it fell to 12 T\_\_T

Mentions:#ENS

i mean, it really depends on what projects you like. personally i'm about: BTC/ETH, DOT, AVAX, ATOM. I also throw small amounts in: EGLD, ZEN, APT, CGLD and ENS. But to each their own.

ENS was pretty sick, nothing like that will ever happen again

Mentions:#ENS

why do some ENS addresses on Opensea have ⚠️ symbol next to their name?

Mentions:#ENS

Yeah, my ENS domain.

Mentions:#ENS

Some ENS are sold for more than 30ETH.

Mentions:#ENS#ETH

Were rare as beer.eth bought back then by Budweiser for 30ETH. Won't be surprised on bull market ENS sold for 100ETH.

Mentions:#ETH#ENS

Semi fungible tokens, see Genopets and Sunflower Land. Also domains as ENS or UD, now usernames as Telegram.

Mentions:#ENS
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